Archive for Juli, 2010


PORTO, Portugal—This country’s move to decriminalize illicit substances—Europe’s most liberal drug legislation—turns 10 years old this month amid new scrutiny and plaudits.

Portugal’s decriminalization regime has caught the eye of regulators in Europe and beyond since it was implemented in 2001. Proponents credit the program for stanching one of Europe’s worst drug epidemics. Critics associate it with higher crime and murder rates. Approaching a decade in force, it is providing a real-world model of one way to address an issue that is a social and economic drag on countries world-wide.

Norway’s government formed a committee to look at better strategies for dealing with drug abuse and sent two delegates to Portugal in early May. Danish politicians have also talked of moving toward full decriminalization. In March, Danish parliamentarian Mette Frederiksen of the opposition Social Democrats praised the Portuguese model.

„For us, this is about the addicts leading a more dignified life,“ she told Danish daily Berlingske. „We want to lower the death rates, the secondary symptoms and the criminality, so we look keenly to Portugal.“

Markel Redondo for The Wall Street JournalA patient takes her methadone dose at a Porto rebab center that is part of Portugal’s decadelong experiment with drug decriminalization.

PORTDRUG

PORTDRUG

Decriminalization has been criticized by United Nations bodies. In its 2009 annual report, the International Narcotics Control Board expressed „concern“ over approaches that decriminalize drugs or introduce alternative treatments. „The movement poses a threat to the coherence and effectiveness of the international drug-control system and sends the wrong message to the general public,“ the board wrote.

In July 2000, Portugal moved beyond previous liberalization regimes in places like the Netherlands by passing a law that transformed drug possession from a matter for the courts to one of public and community health. Trafficking remained a criminal offense but the government did away with arrests, courts and jail time for people carrying a personal supply of anything from marijuana to cocaine to heroin. It established a commission to encourage casual users to quit and backed 78 treatment centers where addicts could seek help.

Portugal’s Fight Against Drugs

About 500 patients from Porto’s Cedofeita rehab center take methodone daily.

In 2008, the last year for which figures are available, more than 40,000 people used the rehab centers and other treatment programs, according to the Institute for Drugs and Drug Addiction, a branch of Portugal’s Ministry of Health. The ministry says it spends about €50 million ($64.5 million) a year on the treatment programs, with €20 million more provided through a charity funded by Portugal’s national lotteries.

Before decriminalization, Portugal was home to an estimated 100,000 problem heroin users, or 1% of the country’s population, says João Goulão, director of the Institute for Drugs and Drug Addiction. By 2008, chronic users for all substances had dropped to about 55,000, he says. The rate of HIV and hepatitis infection among drug users—common health issues associated with needle-sharing—has also fallen since the law’s 2001 rollout.

Portuguese and European Union officials are loath to give publicly funded treatment centers sole credit. They say the drop in problematic drug users could also be attributed to heroin’s declining popularity in Portugal and the rising popularity of cocaine and synthetic drugs among young people.

At the same time, Portugal’s drug-mortality rate, among Europe’s lowest, has risen. Mr. Goulão says this is due in part to improved methods of collecting statistics, but the number of drug-related fatalities can also be traced to mortality among those who became addicted to heroin during the country’s 1980s and 1990s epidemic.

Violent crime, too, has risen since the law’s passage. According to a 2009 report by the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, Portugal’s drug-use and murder rates rose in the years after decriminalization. The general rise in drug use was in keeping with European trends, but the U.N. noted with some alarm that cocaine use doubled and cocaine seizures jumped sevenfold from 2001 to 2006.

Murders rose 40% in the period. The report tentatively links that with drug trafficking, but points out overall murder rates in Portugal remain low.

Pedro do Carmo, deputy national director of Portugal’s judiciary police, says he doesn’t see link the rise in violent crime with decriminalization. Instead, he praises the program for reducing the fear and stigma attached with drug use. „Now, when we pick up an addict, we’re not picking up a criminal,“ he says. „They are more like victims.“

The Portuguese began considering drug decriminalization following a leap in heroin addiction decades ago in the country, a major entry point for drug trafficking from Latin America and North Africa.

The then-ruling Socialist Party government of Prime Minister António Guterres launched a political debate to discuss how to resolve the problem. Members of the right-wing People’s Party decried any tolerance for drug use, saying it would invite drug tourism.

Mr. Guterres’s government pushed through a full decriminalization law. A subsequent center-right coalition led by José Manuel Barroso, now president of the European Commission, didn’t repeal it.

The legislation was the first in a series of liberal policy shifts in this predominantly Roman Catholic country. In May, President Aníbal Cavaco Silva ratified a law allowing same-sex marriage, making it the sixth European country to do so. In 2007, Portugal went from having among the toughest restrictions on abortion to among the most liberal.

Portugal’s focus on close-knit community and protecting the family may be at the heart of many of these reforms, say some observers. In a 1999 report that paved the way for new drug legislation, current Portuguese Prime Minister José Sócrates implored that „drugs are not a problem for other people, for other families, for other people’s children.“

Portugal’s rehab clinics, called Centros de Atendimento de Toxicodependentes, are central to the strategy. In the lively northern port city of Porto, dozens of patients pop in daily to the Cedofeita rehab center to pick up free doses of methadone. Others have scheduled therapy or family counseling sessions, also free.

„The more they can be integrated in their families and their jobs, the better their chances of success,“ says José González, a psychiatrist at Cedofeita. Mr. González says that about half of his 1,500 patients are in substitution treatment, 500 of which take methadone daily. He says there is no defined model or timeline for treatment.

The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, a Lisbon-based European Union agency, says methadone or other substance-substitution programs are generally viewed as successful but has observed that some Portuguese are beginning to question long-term methadone therapy.

„Now that the epidemic is under control for the most part, people start asking questions,“ says Dagmar Hedrich, a senior scientific analyst with the EMCDDA. „The question now is what is going to happen next? There is a part of the population who do not have the possibility of leaving the treatment.“

Werbeanzeigen

The Vienna Declaration

In response to the health and social harms of illegal drugs, a large international drug prohibition regime has been developed under the umbrella of the United Nations.1 Decades of research provide a comprehensive assessment of the impacts of the global “War on Drugs” and, as thousands of individuals gather in Vienna at the XVIII International AIDS Conference, the international scientific community calls for an acknowledgement of the limits and harms of drug prohibition, and for drug policy reform to remove barriers to effective HIV prevention, treatment and care.

The evidence that law enforcement has failed to prevent the availability of illegal drugs, in communities where there is demand, is now unambiguous.2, 3Over the last several decades, national and international drug surveillance systems have demonstrated a general pattern of falling drug prices and increasing drug purity—despite massive investments in drug law enforcement.3,4

Furthermore, there is no evidence that increasing the ferocity of law enforcement meaningfully reduces the prevalence of drug use.5 The data also clearly demonstrate that the number of countries in which people inject illegal drugs is growing, with women and children becoming increasingly affected.6 Outside of sub-Saharan Africa, injection drug use accounts for approximately one in three new cases of HIV.7, 8 In some areas where HIV is spreading most rapidly, such as Eastern Europe and Central Asia, HIV prevalence can be as high as 70% among people who inject drugs, and in some areas more than 80% of all HIV cases are among this group.8

In the context of overwhelming evidence that drug law enforcement has failed to achieve its stated objectives, it is important that its harmful consequences be acknowledged and addressed. These consequences include but are not limited to:

  • HIV epidemics fuelled by the criminalisation of people who use illicit drugs and by prohibitions on the provision of sterile needles and opioid substitution treatment.9, 10
  • HIV outbreaks among incarcerated and institutionalised drug users as a result of punitive laws and policies and a lack of HIV prevention services in these settings.11-13
  • The undermining of public health systems when law enforcement drives drug users away from prevention and care services and into environments where the risk of infectious disease transmission (e.g., HIV, hepatitis C & B, and tuberculosis) and other harms is increased.14-16
  • A crisis in criminal justice systems as a result of record incarceration rates in a number of nations.17, 18 This has negatively affected the social functioning of entire communities. While racial disparities in incarceration rates for drug offences are evident in countries all over the world, the impact has been particularly severe in the US, where approximately one in nine African-American males in the age group 20 to 34 is incarcerated on any given day, primarily as a result of drug law enforcement.19
  • Stigma towards people who use illicit drugs, which reinforces the political popularity of criminalising drug users and undermines HIV prevention and other health promotion efforts.20, 21
  • Severe human rights violations, including torture, forced labour, inhuman and degrading treatment, and execution of drug offenders in a number of countries.22, 23
  • A massive illicit market worth an estimated annual value of US$320 billion.4 These profits remain entirely outside the control of government. They fuel crime, violence and corruption in countless urban communities and have destabilised entire countries, such as Colombia, Mexico and Afghanistan.4
  • Billions of tax dollars wasted on a “War on Drugs” approach to drug control that does not achieve its stated objectives and, instead, directly or indirectly contributes to the above harms.24

Unfortunately, evidence of the failure of drug prohibition to achieve its stated goals, as well as the severe negative consequences of these policies, is often denied by those with vested interests in maintaining the status quo.25This has created confusion among the public and has cost countless lives. Governments and international organisations have ethical and legal obligations to respond to this crisis and must seek to enact alternative evidence-based strategies that can effectively reduce the harms of drugs without creating harms of their own. We, the undersigned, call on governments and international organisations, including the United Nations, to:

  • Undertake a transparent review of the effectiveness of current drug policies.
  • Implement and evaluate a science-based public health approach to address the individual and community harms stemming from illicit drug use.
  • Decriminalise drug users, scale up evidence-based drug dependence treatment options and abolish ineffective compulsory drug treatment centres that violate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.26
  • Unequivocally endorse and scale up funding for the implementation of the comprehensive package of HIV interventions spelled out in the WHO, UNODC and UNAIDS Target Setting Guide.27
  • Meaningfully involve members of the affected community in developing, monitoring and implementing services and policies that affect their lives.

We further call upon the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, to urgently implement measures to ensure that the United Nations system—including the International Narcotics Control Board—speaks with one voice to support the decriminalisation of drug users and the implementation of evidence-based approaches to drug control.28

Basing drug policies on scientific evidence will not eliminate drug use or the problems stemming from drug injecting. However, reorienting drug policies towards evidence-based approaches that respect, protect and fulfil human rights has the potential to reduce harms deriving from current policies and would allow for the redirection of the vast financial resources towards where they are needed most: implementing and evaluating evidence-based prevention, regulatory, treatment and harm reduction interventions.

source and please sign there:http://www.viennadeclaration.com/the-declaration.html

Drug War Statement Upstaged at AIDS Gathering

VIENNA — Some of the world’s top AIDS experts issued a radical manifesto this week at the 18th International AIDS Conference: They declared the war on drugs a 50-year-old failure and called for it to be abandoned.
No one heard.

Officially, the theme of the AIDS meeting, the world’s largest public health gathering, is the need to attack the rapidly growing epidemic among addicts in Eastern Europe, Russia and Asia. It was held in Vienna because this city is the doorway to the East and, in this German-speaking country, all the conference signs are in English and Russian.

(In a lovely ironic touch, the conference hall is only a few steps from the Ferris wheel in the Orson Welles film noir classic set in postwar Vienna, “The Third Man.” On it, a cynical dealer of counterfeit drugs tells his pursuer to look down at the people below and says: “Victims? Don’t be melodramatic…. Would you really feel any pity if one of those dots stopped moving forever?”)

But the organizers’ efforts to get publicity for the Vienna Declaration, which calls for drug users to be spared arrest and offered clean needles, methadone and treatment if they have AIDS, have come to naught. Almost no one here talks about the war on drugs.

Instead, everyone is publicly worrying that the war on AIDS is falling apart. Donor money is evaporating in the recession, and it is looking likely that only about a third of the 33 million infected people in the world will have any hope of treatment.

Frustration is high. Speakers like Bill Gates were interrupted by demonstrators in Sherwood Forest green calling for a “Robin Hood tax” — a tiny fee on the $4 trillion in currency transactions made daily by banks and hedge funds that could raise billions for AIDS.
Many activists blame the Obama administration, which is shifting its priorities to mother-and-child health. The halls are decorated with posters comparing Mr. Obama unfavorably with George W. Bush. On Wednesday, Archbishop Desmond Tutu criticized Mr. Obama in an Op-Ed article in The New York Times.

In his speech here, former President Bill Clinton said Ambassador Eric Goosby, the administration’s global AIDS coordinator, “ought to get some kind of Purple Heart for showing up.”
However, a new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation shows that the United States still gives more for AIDS assistance than all other countries put together, accounting for 58 percent of contributions. Its donations are still going up slightly, while those from Europe, Canada, Japan and Australia are flat or falling.

Officials from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria say they fear they will not come close to the $17 billion target they set for their next donors’ meeting in September.
The other, more welcome, distraction has been the exciting results of a South African clinical trial in which a vaginal gel with an antiretroviral drug protected 40 percent of the women using it. This is the first good news about microbicides in decades of work. A gel women can use secretly has long been sought, since many men disdain condoms and many women want to get pregnant.

The Vienna Declaration is only the second time that the International AIDS Society has issued such a document. The last was the 2000 Durban Declaration, which reaffirmed that H.I.V. was the cause of AIDS. It was a response to the government of South Africa, the conference’s host, which at the time denied that the virus caused disease and refused to buy medicine for its citizens.

Outside of Africa, almost a third of all H.I.V. infections stem from drug injections.
The declaration contends that arresting drug users forces them into hiding, spreading the epidemic. It backs “science-based public health approaches“ proved in clinical trials, which can include everything clean needle swaps, 12-step recovery programs and methadone.

Dr. Evan Wood, an AIDS policy expert at the University of British Columbia and the chief author, cited Portugal’s approach. According to a 2009 report by the libertarian Cato Institute, in the decade since Portugal legalized possession of up to 10 days’ worth of any drug, including cocaine and heroin, its AIDS rate dropped by half, overdose deaths fell, many citizens sought treatment, drug use among young people fell and drug tourism did not develop. The institute called the policy “a resounding success.”
The declaration is largely aimed at countries of the former Soviet Union. In Russia, for example, close to 1 percent of its adult population is infected.

Nonetheless, the country forbids all methadone-type treatments, and the national health plan offers only abrupt detoxification, which has a high failure rate. The most frequent victims — prisoners and people not living in their assigned residence areas — are the least likely to get AIDS drugs, and activists say markups vastly inflate the prices of medications bought cheaply by foreign donors.

“The government says everything is fine,” said Aleksandra Volgina, 31, the leader of Candle, a Russian AIDS organization based in St. Petersburg. “We’re even donors to the Global Fund, but we don’t have treatment; we don’t even have prevention.”
She has stayed off heroin thanks to a 12-step program her family paid for, she said, but every month she worries about whether the government pharmacy will have all three drugs she needs, and some of her friends have died for lack of them.
“What’s going on in Russia is being silenced,” she said. “You can’t even knock on the Health Ministry’s door.”

Despite the quasi-Russian cast to the conference, no one from the Russian government attended, sponsors said.
Only two governments reacted to the declaration: Canada, which rejected it, and Georgia, whose first lady signed it in a public ceremony. The tiny former Soviet republic has a history of brutal treatment of drug addicts, Dr. Wood said. But it also has taken to defying Russia, with which it fought a brief war in 2008.

In the large American delegation here, almost every top official refused to discuss the declaration. Finally, one government official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said he had just called the White House for guidance and was told no one had read it yet and there was no time to respond.

He did note that Dr. Goosby recently announced that countries getting American help to fight AIDS can use it to buy clean needles for addicts, a change from Bush administration policy.
The one exception to the official American silence was Dr. Nora D. Volkow, the normally low-profile director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, who said she personally agreed with the declaration’s premise.
“Addiction is a brain disease,” she said. “I’m a scientist. The evidence unequivocally shows that criminalizing the drug abuser does not solve the problem. I’m very much against legalization of drugs or drug dealing. But I would not arrest a person addicted to drugs. I’d send them to treatment, not prison.”

Asked if she feared being attacked by Congressional conservatives, she said: “I took this job because I want drug users to be recognized as people with a disease. If I don’t speak about it, why even bother to gather the data?”

Quelle: http://www.neuro24.de/synapse.htm

Durch Fortschritte in der Biologie wie in den bildgebenden Verfahren weiß man immer besser wie unser Hirn und unser Körper funktioniert. Es wird dabei auch deutlich, dass Psychotherapie und Psychopharmakatherapie einen ähnlichen Angriffspunkt im Gehirn haben. Die Kenntnis der Vorgänge an den Nervenzellen bringt Biologie und Psychotherapie wieder einander näher. Erfahrung verändert das Gehirn genau so wie die Medikamente tun. Gene sind deshalb nur bedingt Schicksaal. Der alleinige Glaube an die Gene ist ebenso überholt, wie die Leugnung, dass sie wesentlichen Einfluss haben.   Informationen aus der Umgebung verändern die Hirnsubstanz und die Nutzung der genetischen Information. Dadurch wird auch das Verhalten verändert. Reiz und Reaktion sind bei Menschen kein einfacher Reflex sondern ein kompliziertes bisher nur teilweise verstandenes Gefüge von aufklärbaren komplizierten auch biologischen Vorgängen. Gefühle und Denken haben auch eine biochemische Grundlage.  Das Verstehen dieser Grundlagen hilft auch psychosoziale Zusammenhänge zu verstehen und an deren Verbesserung zu arbeiten.  Komplexe Verhaltensweisen von Menschen haben viele Erklärungen auf unterschiedlichsten Ebenen. Biologie, Biochemie, Genetik, Psychologie, Soziologie und Psychiatrie sind keine Gegensätze sondern stellen verschiedene Aspekte in der Erklärung menschlichen Verhaltens dar.

Synapse Der Begriff Synapse wurde 1897 von Sherrington für die Verbindungsstelle zwischen 2 Nervenzellen eingeführt, an dieser werden Informationen zwischen den Zellen ausgetauscht. Inzwischen ist der Begriff allgemeiner verwendet worden.  Ein Neuron oder eine Nervenzelle besteht aus einem Zellkörper (Perikaryon, oder Soma) mit Zellkern dem (Nucleus) und einem langen Hauptfortsatz, dem Axon (oder Neurit). Das Axon kann einige Millimeter und bis zu einem Meter lang werden. Vom Zellkörper gehen viele kurze Fortsätze aus, die Dendriten genannt werden und an denen andere Neuronen mit ihrem Axon „ankoppeln“ können. Die Dendriten vergrößern dabei die Oberfläche des Neuron und bilden zusammen mit dem Soma (Zellkörper) den Ort des Erregungsempfangs eines Neurons. Sender von der Zelle ist die axonale Nervenendigung. Damit ein Neuron eine Information an ein anderes Neuron weiterleiten kann, besitzt jedes Axon an seinem Ende zahlreiche Verästelungen, an denen sogenannte Endknöpfchen sitzen. Diese liegen an der Oberfläche anderer Nerven oder Muskelzellen beinahe auf und bilden so die sog. Synapse.  Der Spalt oder Zwischenraum zwischen zwei Nervenzellen ist etwa  20-30 nm breit und wird Synapsenspalt oder synaptischer Spalt genannt. Dieser Spalt enthält transmitterabbauende Enzyme. Bei vielen Transmittern erfolgt aber kein Abbau, sie werden wieder in das Axon aufgenommen (recycelt) Synapsen sind die Verbindungsstelle zwischen 2 Nervenzellen,  Nervenzellen und Muskelzellen oder Nervenzellen und Sinnenszellen.

Sie bilden die (elektronen-) mikroskopisch kleine Grundlage menschlicher Lernvorgänge, sind die kleinen Schaltstellen unseres Bewusstseins wie jeder Wahrnehmung, Interpretation, Kommunikation oder Bewegung. Bei den besser erforschten chemischen Synapsen wird als Folge der elektrischen Erregung eines Neurons an dessen Synapse eine chemische Substanz („Transmitter“= Überträger, im Nervensystem „Neurotransmitter“ ) freigesetzt. Diese Transmitterausschüttung erfolgt in rasanter Geschwindigkeit von 1/5000 Sek. Der erste Transmitter der genauer bekannt wurde war Acteylcholin, zwischenzeitlich wurden etwa 100 Neurotransmitter identifiziert.. An seinen Beispiel werden Transmitter noch immer in Biologiebüchern näher erklärt. Neurotransmitter werden im Zellplasma unter Beteiligung des endoplasmatischen Reticulums und des Golgi-Apparats synthetisiert und müssen oft weite Strecken vom Zellkörper zur Synapse transportiert werden. Ein ankommendes Aktionspotential (elektrischer Impuls) erregt die Membran im Bereich des Axon- oder Dentritenendköpfchens und aktiviert dadurch Ca2+ – Kanäle, die einen Einstrom von Ca2+ – Ionen aus der umgebenden Zellflüssigkeit ermöglichen. Die erhöhte Ca2+-Konzentration löst die Wanderung der Vesikel an die präsynaptische Membran und die Ausschüttung des Transmitters aus (Exocytose der Vesikel). Die Vesikel verschmelzen dabei mit der präsynaptischen Membran, (fusionieren mit der Zellmembran) nach außen frei. und öffnen sich dabei um den Neurotransmitter in den Spalt frei zu geben.  Diese Neurotransmitter wiederum bewirken, dass es in dem über die Synapse verbundenen Neuron ebenfalls zu einer elektrischen Erregung kommt. Sie dient damit der chemischen Übertragung der fortgeleiteten elektrischen Aktivität von einer Nervenzelle auf die nächste (von der präsynaptischen Nervenzelle (prae=vor) auf die postsynaptische Zelle (post= hinter)). An einer Synapse kann die Erregung nur in eine Richtung übertragen werden. Synapsen haben damit eine Art Ventilwirkung.   Im Endknopf der Synapse befinden sich Mikrotubuli, die im Zytoplasma synthetisierte Neurotransmitter in den Endknopf transportieren  und Vesikel, in denen die Neurotransmitter gespeichert werden. (s.u.)  Die Wirkung eines Neurotransmitters (exzitatorisch = erregend oder inhibitorisch = hemmend) an der postsynaptischen Zelle hängt nicht von den chemischen Eigenschaften des Transmitters ab, sondern von den Eigenschaften des Rezeptors. Der wichtigste Bestandteil der postsynaptischen Membran sind  transmitterspezifische Rezeptoren.  Es gibt aber durchaus überwiegend erregende (z.B.  Glutamat u. Acetylcholin)  oder hemmende (GABA, Glycin) Neurotransmitter. Rezeptoren bilden mit dem Überträgerstoff einen funktionalen Komplex. Agonisten sind Substanz, die stimulierend auf einen Rezeptor wirken , Antagonisten sind Substanzen, die hemmend auf einen Rezeptor wirken. Rezeptoren besitzen eine bestimmte Selektivität und Affinität. Substanzen, die zu einem bestimmten Rezeptor eine hohe Affinität zeigen, werden als Liganden bezeichnet. Ist ein bestimmter Stoff fähig mit einem Rezeptor zu reagieren und einen biologischen Effekt auszulösen, so bezeichnet man diese Fähigkeit als intrinsische Aktivität des Stoffes. An den Dendriten und den Zelleibern der meisten Nervenzellen findet sich ein Gemisch aus inhibitorischen und excitatorischen Synapsen. Der jeweilige Erregungszustand solcher Nervenzellen stellt demnach eine Integration der aus unterschiedlichen Richtungen eingetroffenen Informationen dar. Unser Gehirn besteht aus etwa 100 Milliarden Nervenzellen. An einer Synapse kann die Erregung nur in eine Richtung übertragen werden.  Jede Nervenzelle im Gehirn hat durchschnittlich etwa 10 000 Synapsen mit anderen Nervenzellen. Insgesamt geht man von einer Billiarde Synapsen (1.000.000.000.000.000 Synapsen) im Gehirn aus. Die Zahl der Synapsen nimmt bei Menschen in den ersten 3-6 Lebensjahren zu um dann bis zum jungen Erwachsenenalter wieder abzunehmen. Dies geht allerdings nicht mit einer Verminderung der Lernfähigkeit einher. Synapsen verändern sich bei Lernvorgängen,  die synaptischen Netzwerke der der Nervenzellen werden effektiver unnötiges kann damit auch entfernt werden.  Oft münden die Synapsen zahlreicher präsynaptischer Nervenzellen (selten bis zu 500 000 oft über 10 000) auf ein postsynaptisches Neuron. Jedes Neuron kommuniziert nicht nur mit einem Nachbarn, sondern kann Tausende von Kontakten mit anderen knüpfen. Sie kann so von einem Nachbarn gehemmt werden, während sie von einem anderen das Signal zur Aktivität bekommt.  In der präsynaptischen Axonendigung befinden sich je nach Zelle wenige (5-10) bis einige Tausend membranumhüllte synaptische Vesikel, die einen Durchmesser von ungefähr 40nm haben und jeweils 1000 bis 5000 Transmittermoleküle enthalten. Die monoaminen Neurotransmitter werden überwiegend im Endknöpfchen hergestellt, die Peptide an den Ribosomen im Soma des Neurons und wandern dann zum Endknöpfchen. Vorstufen mancher  Transmittermoleküle aber auch diese selbst werden im Zellkörper hergestellt,  sie werden dann über oft lange Strecken (Man bedenke z.B. die Länge des Ischiasnerven vom Rückenmark zum Fuß), durch das Axoplasma, bis zum Ende der Nervenfaser transportiert.  Dieser Weg ist langsam (40 cm/Tag) spielt aber nur für die „Vorratshaltung“ und bleibende Veränderungen eine Rolle. Der transport geht dabei in beide Richtungen, antegrad und retrograd.  (siehe auch unter Aktionspotential) Man unterscheidet: neuromuskuläre Synapsen, darunter versteht man die Kontaktstelle eines Motoneurons mit einer Muskelfaser, Überträgerstoff dort ist Acetylcholin. Neuromuskuläre Synapsen sind die Schaltstellen zwischen Gehirn und Muskel, die jede Art der Bewegung inklusive der Atmung kontrollieren.  Je nach den miteinander verbundenen Abschnitten der beteiligten Nervenzellen bzw. Nervenzellfortsätze unterscheidet man bei den Synapsen zwischen Nervenzellen: axo-dendritische Synapsen zwischen einem reizweiterleitenden Fortsatz einer Nervenzelle (Axon) und einem reizempfangenden Fortsatz (Dendrit) einer anderen Nervenzelle. axo-somatische Synapsen: zwischen dem Axon einer Nervenzelle und dem Zelleib (Perikaryon = Soma) der nachgeschalteten Nervenzelle. axo-axonale Synapsen: zwischen 2 Axonen, dabei bildet ein langes, vorgeschaltetes Axon meist kurz nach dem Abgang des nachgeschalteten Axons vom Perikaryon eine Synapse an diesem aus.  somatosomatische Synapsen: zwischen den Nervenzellkörpern zweier direkt nebeneinander liegender Nervenzellen. dendrodendritische Synapsen: zwischen Dendriten zweier verschiedener Nervenzellen (selten).  en passant Synapsen: an einem geradlinig verlaufenden Axon wird nach seitlich hin eine Synapse zu einer benachbarten Zelle oder einem anderen Axon gebildet. reziproke Synapsen: synaptische Endkolben an Axonkollateralen einer Nervenzelle enden am Perikaryon oder an Dendriten derselben Nervenzelle. Die Wirkung eines Medikamentes hängt auch davon ab, wie schnell die Veränderungen an der Synapse eintreten. Codein muss erst in der Leber zu Morphium umgewandelt werden und kommt deshalb erst langsam als Morphium zum Gehirn, es euphorisiert deshalb meist nicht. Das chemisch vom Morphium nur gering abgewandelte Heroin (Diacetylmorphin) hingegen ist fettlöslicher als Morphium und kann deshalb viel schneller als Morphium vom Gehirn aufgenommen werden. Hierdurch kommt es zur Euphorisierung und schnellen Suchtentwicklung.

Die chemische Synapse besteht aus einem Spalt zwischen zwei Nervenzellen. Dabei werden dort letztlich die Stromimpulse mit denen die Zellen ihre Information schnell transportieren können in chemische Überträgerstoffe (Neurotransmitter) umgewandelt. Der Informationsaustausch zwischen den Zellen geschieht in den Synapsen also mittels chemischer Botenstoffe. Die monoaminen Neurotransmitter wie  z.B.: Dopamin, Noradrenalin und Serotonin können in der Zelle sowohl im Zellkern und -köper als auch in den Dendriten synthetisiert werden, sie können aus dem Synaptischen Spalt auch wieder aufgenommen und wieder verwendet werden (Reuptake). Andere Transmitter wie Neuropeptide können nur im Zellkern synthetisiert werden und müssen dann entlang des Axons zur Synapse transportiert werden, sie können nicht aus dem synaptischen Spalt wieder aufgenommen und wieder verwendet werden, es gibt für sie keine Reuptakepumpe, sie werden durch Peptidasen abgebaut.  Nervenzellen besitzen ein Transportsystem vom Zellkern zum Dendriten und vom Zellkern zum Axon sowie jeweils umgekehrt. Dabei gibt es eine schnellen anterograden Transport mit 400 mm/Tag, einen langsamen anterograden Transport mit  0.2 – 2.5 mm/Tag sowie einen retrograden Transport mit  200-300 mm/Tag. Die Impulse zuleitende Membran der Zelle, die die Erregung überträgt, wird als präsynaptische Membran, die Membran der nachgeschalteten, zu erregenden Zelle als postsynaptische oder subsynaptische Membran bezeichnet. Zwischen diesen Membranen befindet sich der ca. 20 nm weite synaptische Spaltraum. Innen an der präsynaptischen Membran lassen sich mehr oder weniger gut Substanzverdichtungen (dense projections) erkennen, die ein Gitterwerk bilden. In diesem Bereich sind Cadherine und der Transmittervesikelandockung dienende Proteine vorhanden. n der präsynaptischen Zelle sind chemische Transmitterstoffe in kleinen Bläschen, den synaptischen Vesikeln, eingeschlossen. Von einem elektrischen Impuls ausgelöst verschmelzen diese Vesikel mit der präsynaptischen Membran. Dabei werden die Neurotransmitter  aus der Zelle ausgeschüttet und gelangen durch den schmalen synaptischen Spalt zu den Ionenkanälen der Zielzelle. Die Transmitterstoffe heften sich an den Eingang der Ionenkanäle an und bewirken deren Öffnung. Ein Teil der Jonenkanäle erlaubt extracellulären Ca2+ Ionen in die Zelle einzudringen. Alternativ, können Veränderungen der K+ Kanäle, durch eine Reduktion der K+ Ströme zu einer starken Zunahme der elektrischen Leitfähigkeit der Nerven führen.

Rezeptoren werden in ionotrope Rezeptoren und metabotropen Rezeptoren unterschieden. Die ionotropen Rezeptoren können nachdem ein spezifischer Transmitter gebunden hat direkt ein elektrisches Potential aufzubauen, da sie strukturell zugleich einem Ionenkanal entsprechen. Ionenkanäle sind hochspezialisierte Öffnungen, durch die bei Bedarf Ionen strömen können. Sie sind spezifisch eine ganz bestimmte Ionenart (Natrium-, Kalzium- und Kaliumkanäle). Bei einer elektrischen Erregung einer Nervenzelle kommt es zu einer Öffnung der unterschiedlichen Ionenkanäle in einem genau festgelegten zeitlichen Ablauf, beginnend mit Natriumkanälen, gefolgt von Kaliumkanälen. Die in der Ausgangssituation bestehenden Konzentrationsunterschiede der verschiedenen Ionenarten zwischen Zellinnerem und Extrazellularraum führen dabei zu raschen Ionenverschiebungen entsprechend den Konzentrationsgefällen. Natrium fließt nach innen, Kalium nach außen. Nach Beginn des Natriumstroms potenziert sich dieser schnell. Die Natriumkanäle haben dabei eine festgelegte Öffnungszeit von 1-2 ms. Danach schließen sie und bleiben für eine Refraktärzeit geschlossen. Wenn durch die geöffneten Natriumkanäle große Mengen Natrium nach außen geflossen ist, kommt es zu einer Depolarisierung, da die Kaliumkanäle zunächst nicht geöffnet sind. Erst am Maximum des Natriumflusses öffnen die Kaliumkanäle ohne Zeitlimit um das Konzentrationsgefälle wieder auszugleichen, durch Ausstrom von Kaliumionen kommt es zu einer vorübergehenden Hyperpolarisierung der Membran. Im Ruhezustand ist also die postsynaptische Nervenzelle (hinter der postsynaptischen Membran) negativ geladen, dies auch, da es dort mehr negative Protein- Ionen (Anionen) gibt als positive Kalium Ionen. -> Es liegt also eine Spannung von -30 bis -100 mV vor, die als Ruhepotential bezeichnet wird. Die postsynaptische Membran entspricht damit dem Di-elektrikum beim Kondensator. – Wird die Synapse erregt, werden vom Endkopf Neurotransmitter über den synaptischen Spalt zur postsynaptischen Nervenzelle geschickt. Dadurch wird deren Membran kurzzeitig durchlässig (permeabel) für die positiven Natrium Ionen, die dann schnell aus dem synaptischen Spalt in die Nervenzelle einströmen. Das Membranpotential wird durch den Stromfluss für kurze Zeit „aufgehoben“ bzw. auf 0 V gebracht oder bis 30mV hyperpolarisiert (Aktionspotential). Ionenkanalkrankheiten (Channelopathies) sind in der Forschung der letzten Jahre teilweise entschlüsselt worden. Störungen der Chloridkanäle sind für die Myotonia congenita Thomson und die Myotonia congenita Becker verantwortlich. Störungen der Natriumkanäle für die Paramyotonia congenita Eulenburg, , die Myotonia fluctuans, die Myotonia permanens, die  azetazolamidsensitiven Myotonien und die hyperkaliämische periodischen Lähmungen. Störungen der Kalziumkanäle scheinen verantwortlich für die hypokaliämische periodische Lähmung, die maligne Hyperthermie, und die Central-Core-Myopathie sowie die bestimmte Formen der Nachtblindheit.  Auch beim Isaacs- Syndrom der erworbenen Neuromyotonie handelt es sich eine Antikörper- vermittelte Kaliumjonenkanalerkrankung. Die „target Channelproteine dieser Antigene sind so genannte „voltage-gated Kaliumkanäle (VGKCs), besonders Dendrotoxinsensitiv schnelle Kaliumkanäle oder der ganglionischen nikotinischen Acetylcholinrezeptoren (AChR). Die Unterdrückung des auswärtsgerichteten Kaliumstroms führt hier zu einer Übererregbarkeit der peripheren Nerven. Störungen an den Kaliumkanälen werden für die familiären benignen Konvulsionen bei Neugeborenen, die episodische Ataxie Typ 1, die paroxysmale Choreoathetose, und eine Form der hereditären Taubheit verantwortlich gemacht. An der Kenntnis des pathophysiologischen Mechanismus kann auch die Behandlung ansetzen. Medikamente, Konzentrationsänderungen der Ionen können die Schwelle der Aktivierung der Ionenkanäle verändern oder diese inaktivieren, ein Aktionspotential und eine Weiterleitung eines Nervenimpulses wird damit entweder erleichtert oder verhindert. Muscle Nerve 26: 702-707, 2002. Die Entwicklung einer diabetischen Neuropathie scheint durch eine Dysregulation der Expression von Natriumkanälen bedingt zu sein, die vermutlich zur Entstehung der neuropathischen Schmerzen beiträgt.Die veränderte Expression der Natriumkanäle geht mit einer Übererregbarkeit der betroffenen Afferenzen einher. Dadurch könnten ektope Entladungen getriggert werden, die wiederum für eine Sensibilisierung zentraler Neurone ausreichen könnten. Eine Folge wäre die taktile Allodynie.  Craner MJ et al.: Changes of sodium channel expression in experimental painful diabetic neuropathy Annals of Neurology. Vol. 52; 786-792

Neurotransmitter:

Funktion:

Enzymsynthese durch

Acetylcholin

meist erregend Cholinacetyltransferase erster entschlüsselter Transmitter, sowohl im Gehirn mit verschieden muskarinergen und niktinergen Synapsen bedeutend, als auch an der Verbindung Muskel und Nerv

Bioaktive Amine

Dopamin erregend und hemmend Tyrosinhydroxilase bei M.Parkinoson, Sucht, Schizophrenie bedeutsam
Adrenalin erregend Tyrosinhydroxilase und Dopamine-b-hydroxilase Sympathischer Transmitter
Noradrenalin erregend Tyrosinhydroxilase und Dopamine-b-hydroxilase bei Depressionen, Schmerzen, Angst, ADS bedeutsam
Serotonin erregend Tryptophan hydroxilase bei Depressionen, Schmerzen, Angst, ADS bedeutsam

Aminosäuren

Glutamat erregend 20 mmol, im Gehirn 10 000x mehr vorhanden als z.B. Serotonin. da auch Stoffwechselprodukt und Proteinbaustein.
Glycin meist hemmend Haupsächlich im Rückenmark und weniger in der Hirnrinde relevant
Gamma-Aminobutersäure (GABA) Hemmend Glutamatdecarboxylase wichtig bei Epilepsie
Aspartat

Damit können bestimmte Ionen in die Zielzelle eindringen und erhöhen oder verringern ihr Potential. Die Ladung der durch die Ionenkanäle wandernden Ionen bestimmt, ob es sich bei der Synapse um eine erregende oder hemmende Synapse handelt. Positiv geladene Ionen erhöhen das Potential im Inneren der Zelle und damit die Wahrscheinlichkeit, daß die Zelle feuert. In diesem Fall nennt man die Synapse erregend oder excitatorisch. Bei einer hemmenden oder inhibitorischen Synapse wird das Potential im Inneren der Zelle durch negativ geladene Ionen erniedrigt und die Bereitschaft zu feuern wird herabgesetzt. Ob ein Transmitter die postsynaptische Membran depolarisiert oder hyperpolarisiert hängt vom Rezeptortyp ab. Je nach Ionenkanal, mit dem der Rezeptor gekoppelt ist, öffnet der Transmitter – Natriumkanäle führt dies zur Depolarisierung bei – Kalium- oder Chlorkanälen zur  Hyperpolarisierung   In der postsynaptischen Membran einer zentralen Synapse sind die Ionenkanäle nicht spannungsgesteuert – es gibt keinen Schellenwert, also auch kein AP an der Membran von Dendriten und Zellkörper. Die Amplitude des PSPs hängt von der Transmitterkonzentration ab – die wiederum von der AP-Frequenz der in das Endknöpfchen einlaufenden Erregung und die von der Reizstärke als Ursache der Erregung. Die Aktivierung von Synapsen führt zur Freisetzung kleiner Mengen des an sich giftigen Gases NO. Dieses wiederum sorgt dafür, dass bei einem ähnlichen Reiz in kurzer Folge diese und ähnliche Synapsen in der Umgebung schneller reagieren und beschleunigen und verbessern damit die Reaktion auf einen Umweltreiz.. NO, ist vermutlich an akuten und chronischen entzündlichen und neurodegenerativen Prozessen nützlich wie schädlich beteiligt. Die deletären Folgen eines Schlaganfalls oder einer mechanischen Traumatisierung z. B. werden mit einer Störung der NO-Homöostase in Verbindung gebracht. Bei Knockout Mäusen konnte dies nachgewiesen werden. Auch primär degenerative Krankheiten, wie die Parkinsonsche und Alzheimersche Krankheit oder die amyotrophe Lateralsklerose, selbst die Migräne und die Entstehung einer Sucht scheinen mit Störungen im NO- Stoffwechsel zusammenzuhängen.. Die molekularen Mechanismen der NO-Wirkung sind außerordentlich komplex. NO kann als Gas nicht in Vesikeln gespeichert werden. Als gasförmiges Radikal vermag NO unter Bindung an Hämgruppen, an Eisen-Schwefel-Cluster und Thiolgruppen mit einer großen Vielzahl von Biomolekülen zu reagieren und diese in ihrer Konstitution, mithin in ihrer Funktionsweise zu verändern. Außerdem ist NO vielfältig in den Metabolismus reaktiver Sauerstoff- und weiterer Stickstoffspezies eingebunden. Aus NO und dem Superoxidradikal entsteht hochreaktives Peroxynitrit, das in verschiedene, ebenfalls sehr reaktionsfreudige Folgeprodukte umgesetzt werden kann und in mancher Hinsicht sogar als der eigentliche Mediator von NO-Wirkungen verstanden wird. NO ist der Neurotransmitter der Errektion. NO stimuliert die Bildung von zyklischem GMP, was zur Dilatation der Corpora cavernosa des Penis und zum Bluteinfluss führt. Sildenafil (Viagra) hemmt die Typ 5 Phosphodiesterase, die selektiv zyklisches GMP abbaut, dadurch steigt der zyklische GMP Spiegel an und entsteht die Errektion. NO ist damit der Neurotransmitter, der die Erektion des Penis auslöst und dessen Erektion aufrechterhält. NWG 3/97 Als andere Gase scheinen auch CO und HO eine Rolle als Neurotransmitter zu spielen. Eine entscheidende Rolle von NO im Gehirn könnte in der Hemmung von Progenitorzellen liegen.  Neurale Progenitorzellen sind im gesamten Gehirn und Rückenmark weit verbreitet, dennoch scheint es nur selten zu einer Neubildung von Nervenzellen zu kommen. Von besonderem Interesse in der Forschung ist deshalb, wie die Neurogenese im erwachsenen Gehirn gehemmt wird. Aus Tierversuchen ergibt sich, dass NO möglicherweise ein wichtiger negativer Regulator der Zellproliferation im erwachsenen Gehirn von Säugetieren ist. Wenn die  NO- Produktion im Ratenhirn durch eine Infusion von einem NO- Synthasehemmer in die Ventrikel gehemmt wird, bilden sich ebenso vermehrt neue Nervenzellen, wie bei einer Nullmutante der Neuronal NO-Synthase bei speziellen Knockoutmäusen. Aus diesen Forschungen könnte sich ein Ansatz ergeben, wie das Potential des Gehirns zur Sebsterneuerung über das Nachwachsen neuer Nervenzellen besser genutzt werden kann. Packer et al. PNAS August 5, 2003, 100/16, 9566–9571 www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1633579100

Zweite Transmitter (second messager)

Metabotrope Rezeptoren können nur indirekt ein Potential aufbauen nachdem ein spezifischer Transmitter gebunden hat. Dies funktioniert über die Zwischenschaltung einer „second messenger“-Kaskade, die z. B. G-Proteine, Adenylatzyklase, cAMP und cAMP-abhängige Kinasen, die dann Kanalproteine phosphorylieren, umfassen.  Im ZNS wirken viele Transmitter wie Dopamin und Noradrenalin indirekt, indem sie die Konzentration eines zweiten Transmitters (second messenger) erhöhen oder senken, der dann seinerseits die elektrischen oder biochemischen Wirkungen auslöst. Dieser zweite Transmitter ist das cyclische Adenosinmonophosphat ( cyclo-AMP ). Der Neurotransmitter dockt dabei an das Rezeptorprotein an, welches daraufhin ein G-Protein auf der Innenseite der Membran aktiviert. Das G-Protein seinerseits aktiviert ein Enzym, welches aus ATP den sekundären Botenstoff cAMP synthetisiert. Das cAMP setzt sich in das allosterische Zentrum des Ionenkanals, der sich daraufhin öffnet. cAMP ist bei jedem Lernvorgang und jeder Anpassung an unsere Umgebung beteiligt. Eine wichtige Rolle spielt dabei DARPP-32 (Dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein)  Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass DARPP-32 eine wichtige Rolle in der Kontrolle von Rezeptoren, Ionenkanälen und andere physiologischen Faktoren spielt, einschließlich der Antwort des Gehirns auf Drogen wie Kokain, Opiate, Koffein und Nikotin.  DARPP-32 wird reziprok von Dopamin und Glutamt reguliert. Dopamine aktiviert DARPP-32 über die D1 Rezeptoren und inhibiert es über D2 Rezeptoren.  Glutamat inaktiviert  DARPP-32 über seinen N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Rezeptor. Bei Patienten mit einer Schizophrenie scheint eine Verminderung von DARPP-32- Proteinspiegeln in den dorsolateralen präfrontalen Rindenregionen eine Rolle in der Krankheitsentstehung zu spielen. Die Hirnregion ist für das abstrakte Denken und das Gefühlserleben wichtig. Nach neueren Hypothesen spielt DARPP-32 auch bei Depressionen eine wichtige Rolle. Koffein scheint übrigens ebenfalls über die Phosphorylisation von DARPP-32 zu wirken. Das Protein ist in den Basalganglien besonders konzentriert vorhanden. Dort kommt anscheinend die akitivierende Wirkung des Koffeins zustande. (Gilberto Nature 2002; 418: 774–78).  Das cAMP setzt sich in das allosterische Zentrum des Ionenkanals, der sich daraufhin öffnet. Intrazelluläre Botenstoffe wie cAMP bezeichnet man auch als „second messenger“, im Gegensatz zu den primären Botenstoffen wie Hormone und Neurotransmitter. Die Konzentration von cAMP kann deshalb von Neurotransmittern z.B. von Dopamin, Serotonin, Muscarin; Acetylcholin und Noradrenalin verändert werden kann, da deren Rezeptoren in der postsynaptischen Membran an das Enzym Adenylat-Cyclase gekoppelt ist. Dieses katalysiert die Umwandlung von Adenosintriphosphat ( ATP ) in cyclo-AMP . Die Adenylat-cyclase ist inaktiv, bis sich Noradrenalin an den Rezeptor bindet. Da ein Molekül Adenylat-cyclase tausend Moleküle cyclo- AMP katalysiert, wird das schwache Signale der Transmitter-Rezeptor-Reaktion deutlich verstärkt. Veränderungen in den  Ca++ Jonenspiegeln können zu einer Aktivierung der cyclischen AMP Kaskade (second messenger) führen. Das Protein Calmodulin, spielt dabei eine wesentliche rolle es ist ein Sensor für den intracellulärr Ca2+ Spiegel und aktiviert die Adenylcyclase Rutabaga, die als Antwort auf die Neurotransmitter ATP in cAMP umwandelt.  K+ Kanäle führen primär zu einer erhöhten neuronalen Aktivität und einer Zunahme der synaptischen Strukturen  und Verzweigungen.  Die daraus resultierenden K+ Kanal Veränderungen sollen die Motoneuronaktivität und die synaptische Übertragung (transmission) ebenfalls durch erhöhte cAMP Aktivität als „second messenger“ beschleunigen. Cyclo-AMP aktiviert außerdem (neben auch anderen Enzymen) Enzyme, die die Übertragung von Phosphatgruppen auf Membranproteine katalysieren, wodurch sich die Durchlässigkeit der Membran für Ionen und damit die Erregbarkeit der Zelle ändert.  Nicht nur Neurotransmitter auch Hormone, Neuromodulatoren und Wachstumsfaktoren wirken über cAMP. Neurotransmitter geben Signale auch über an G-Proteine gekoppelte Rezeptoren weiter, die oben bereits erhöhten Konzentration des „second messengers“ cAMP führt auch zur  erhöhten Aktivierung von Proteinkinasen (PKA) und des Transkriptionsfaktors CREB (cAMPresponse-element-binding protein). Transkriptionsfaktoren binden dann an wichtige regulatorische Einheiten von Genen, und beeinflussen wiederum deren Expression in bestimmten Hirnregionen. Second messenger regulieren also auch die Genexpression und verändern damit dauerhaft die Nutzung der Erbsubstanzen der Zellen. Es ist inzwischen bekannt, dass Transmitter, die über second messenger arbeiten die Regulationsprotenine für die Transskription phosphorylieren (Bindung von Phosphat (PO4) an den Tanscriptionsfaktor)  und so die Genexpression verändern. Bei der Regulation der Genexpression spielen auch  Aktivierungen der „Immediate-Early Genes (IEGs)“(z.B.: c-fos und c-jun) eine Rolle, die Expression von c-jun steht am Anfang des Regenerationsprozesses und auch des Zelltods (Apoptose). Welcher dieser Wege eingeleitet wird bestimmen Kinasen und Phosphorylierungsprozesse.  Die zweiten Transmitter induzieren nach dem oben besprochenen nicht nur die Synthese der bereits in der Zelle vorhandenen Proteine sondern auch neuer bisher dort nicht vorhandener Eiweiße, sie nehmen Einfluss auf die RNA.  Ein Vorgang der manchmal Tage beansprucht. Hieraus können Veränderungen im Nervenwachstum und eine Veränderung der Synapsen resultieren.  Dieser Mechanismus spielt wahrscheinlich beim Langzeitgedächtnis eine große Rolle. Etwa 10000 Gene verschlüsseln (kodieren) verschiedene Eiweiße (Proteine). Die meisten Eiweiße die auf Grundlage des genetischen Kodes gebildet werden sind noch nicht bekannt. Die Entschlüsselung dieser Proteine und die Erforschung deren Bedeutung steht ebenfalls erst am Anfang. Aus dieser Entschlüsselung werden sich sowohl neue therapeutische Perspektiven durch Behandlung mit diesen Proteinen ergeben. Immerhin gelang es kürzlich in einem Mäusehirn über 8000 verschiedene Eiweiße nachzuweisen, gleichzeitig wurde nachgewiesen, dass sich die Eiweiße bei Mäusen verschiedener Rassen erheblich unterscheiden. Es ist also noch für viele Jahre Stoff für Forscher und Experimente vorhanden bis die „Hardware“ des Gehirns auf dieser Ebene verstanden wird. Therapeutische Anwendungen werden sich daraus selbstverständlich ergeben. In der Nutzung der verschiedenen Eiweiße wird der wesentliche Entwicklungsschritt in der Weiterentwicklung der Arten gesehen. Die Forschung ist erst am Anfang die Bedeutung dieser Eiweiße zu erkennen. Eines der bedeutendsten Neuropeptide, die als Transmitter eine Rolle spielen ist die Substanz P, man ordnete dieses Peptid früher den Tachykininen zu, weil sie schnell reagierend sind, heute nennt man die Substanzgruppe Neurokinine (NKs), Substanz P bindet and den NK1- Rezeptoren und spielt eine wichtige Rolle bei der Regulation der Schmerzwahrnehmung aber auch bei Depressionen und Angststörungen. Bei Angststörungen wurden erhöhte Liquorkonzentrationen von Substanz P gefunden, die eine Korrelation zu Angstsymptomen zeigten. Substanz P- Rezeptorantagonisten sind in der Behandlung von Depressionen in der Erprobung, erste Studien scheinen auf eine Wirksamkeit hinzuweisen. Der Wirkmechanismus soll eine Beeinflussung serotonerger und noradrenerger Systeme, bei der hippokampalen Neurogenese und auf der Stresshormonachse liegen.  (Siehe Lieb, K., et al., Nervenheilkunde 10/02 Seite 493 ff).

Neben cAMP sind auch andere second Messengers bekannt:

Second Messenger Beispiele von Transmittern und Hormonen, die dieses System nutzen
Zyklisches  AMP (cAMP) Dopamin, Noradrenalin, GABA, Serotonin, Acethylcholin, Glucagon, LH, FSH, TSH; Calcitonin, Parathormon, ADH,
Proteinkinase Aktivität Insulin, Prolactin, Oxytocin, Erythropoietin, verschiedene Wachsttumsfaktornen
Calcium und/oder Phosphoinositide besonders Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphat (IP3) Noradrenalin, Angiotensin II, ADH, GRH, TRH,
Zyklisches GMP (cGMP) Atriales naturetisches Hormon, NO2

Die Neurotransmitter werden aus den Synapsen wieder recycelt. Diese Wiederaufnahme (reuptake) in die Nervenzelle die den Transmitter ausgeschüttet hat, ist besonders über die Serotonin Wiederaufnahmehemmer allgemein bekannt geworden. Dieser Wirkmechanismus gilt allerdings auch für andere Neurotransmitter und auch andere Antidepressiva. Die Wiederaufnahme der Neurotransmitter spielt auch biologisch bei Persönlichkeitsstörungen und anderen Erkrankungen eine Rolle. Beispiel:  Der Dopamintransporter (DAT) vermittelt die synaptische Wiederaufnahme von Dopamin in das dopaminerge Neuron über einen Na+- und CI–gekoppelten Mechanismus. Der DAT wird im ZNS differenziell nur in dopaminergen Neuronen exprimiert, mit einer hohen Expressionsrate im ventralen Teil der Substantia nigra pars compacta, weniger in der ventralen Tegmentumregion und dem Hypothalamus. Diese Verteilung korreliert streng mit dem Ausmaß der dopaminergen Neurodegeneration beim Morbus Parkinson. Obwohl der DAT sehr selektiv für seinen Transmitter ist, transportiert er auch strukturelle Analoga des Dopamins, die mit vitalen intrazellulären Strukturen interagieren können. Auch an anderen Stellen der Synapse können Veränderungen der Bestandteile zu Persönlichkeitsveränderungen führen. Störungen im Bereich der Proteinkinase Ce (PKCe) scheinen Angst zu reduzieren, zumindest ist dies bei bestimmten Labormäusen. Mäuse ohne  PKCe haben eine erhöhte GABAA Rezeptor Sensitivität für endogene positive neurosteroidale Modulatoren die zu einem verminderten Angstverhalten und zu einer verminderten  Stresshormonantwort des Körpers beitragen. Die Erforschung der Neuromodulation der Angstreaktion kann eventuell neue Therapieoptionen aufzeigen.

Möglicherweise spielen die Stützzellen im ZNS eine größere Rolle als bisher angenommen. Gliazellen werden schon lange nicht mehr als nur passive Elemente der Nervensysteme angesehen. Daß sie aber an synaptischen Prozessen direkt beteiligt sind oder gar selbst synaptisch aktiv werden, eröffnet eine ganz neue Dimension für die Funktion von Gliazellen und für die zelluläre Informationsverarbeitung im Gehirn. Neuere Arbeiten haben erste Hinweise für eine synaptische Rolle der Glia geliefert, die Bedeutung ist noch unklar. NWG 4/00

Eine Sonderform sind die elektrischen Synapsen.  Bei einer elektrischen Synapse sind zwei Neuronen direkt durch Kanäle verbunden, über die sich die elektrische Erregung von einem auf das andere Neuron fortpflanzen kann. Das anatomische Korrelat zu elektrischen Synapsen sind die sogenannten Gap-Junctions. Prä- und postsynaptische Membranen sind dicht aneinander gelagert. Es gibt keinen synaptischen Spalt. In beiden Membranen lassen sich elektronenmikroskopisch dicht gepackte Partikel nachweisen (Connexons), die aus je 6 Connexin-Untereinheiten bestehen. Gap junctions sind Ansammlungen interzellularer Kanäle die von Connexinen gebildet werden, eine multigene Familie mit 20 verschiedenen Varianten bei Menschen. Gap junctions zwischen Neuronen bilden das anatomische Substrat der elektrischen Synapsen. Pannexine haben Gemeinsamkeiten mit den Gap junction bildenden Proteinen. Nach einer neuen Untersuchung werden die Gene Pannexin 1 (Px1) und Px2 im Gehirn sehr stark und weit verbreitet exprimiert. ,In vielen neuronalen Zellverbänden, einschließlich Hippocampus, Bulbus olfactorius, Rinde und Kleinhirn gibt eis eine Coexpression beider Pannexine, in anderen Hirngebieten, besonders in der weißen Substanz, fanden sich nur Px1-positive Zellen. Obwohl elektrische Synapsen im Gegensatz zu chemischen Synapsen im Gehirn weniger verbreitet sind, haben Studien gezeigt, dass insbesondere Interneurone im Hippocampus und Neocortex mittels elektrischer Synapsen kommunizieren. Die jetzt nachgewiesene weitere Verbreitung könnte auf eine größere Bedeutung dieser Synapsen hinweisen. Roberto Bruzzone, Sheriar G. Hormuzdi, Michael T. Barbe, Anne Herb, and Hannah Monyer  Pannexins, a family of gap junction proteins expressed in brain PNAS 2003 100: 13644-13649; published online before print November 3 2003, 10.1073/pnas.2233464100 [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Supporting Figures]Vorteil der elektrischen Synapsen ist die hohe Geschwindigkeit.  Diese direkte, elektrische oder ephaptische Inhibition kommt somit ohne einen zusätzlichen Neurotransmitter aus. Elektrische Synapsen sind deshalb besonders geeignet, die elektrische Aktivität in einer ganzen Gruppe von Nervenzellen zu synchronisieren bzw. schnell über mehrere Zellverbindungen zu übertragen.  Elektrische Synapsen findet man z.B. im Herzmuskel zwischen den Muskelzellen. Daneben gibt es gemischte chemische und elektrische Synapsen.

Warum wir nicht Sklaven unserer Gene sind,
Bedeutung der Synapsen für das Funktionieren den Gehirns, Lernen wie auch Krankheiten- Mit Hilfe einer Naktschnecke wurde das Rätsel des menschlichen Gedächtnisses und Lernens teilweise gelöst.

Die grundlegenden Eigenschaften der Synapsen im Gehirn sind sehr unterschiedlich. Teilweise hängt dies von der Art des Neurotransmitters ab der freigesetzt wird, teilweise ist dies aber auch abhängig von den Rezeptorsubtypen die sich prä- und postsynaptisch finden. Zusätzlich hängt die präsynaptische Freisetzung der Transmitter von bestimmten Proteingruppen ab. Ein wesentlicher Bestandteil synaptischer Plastizität ist die unterschiedliche Reaktion auf wiederholte Aktivierung.  Die meisten exzitatorischen (erregenden) Synapsen zeigen eine so genannte paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), dies bedeutet, dass ein zweiter Impuls der in einem engen Zeitfenster stattfindet (40 ms) etwas verstärkt wird. Inhibitorische (hemmende) Syynapsen zeigen dagegen eine paired-pulse depression, hier wird der 2 Impuls im Zeitfenster blockiert. Oft wiederholte Impulse können zu einem Aussprossen von Synapsen führen und neue Dendriten wachsen lassen. Diese Effekte sind in verschiedenen Hirnregionen und verschiedenen Arten von Zellen unterschiedlich ausgeprägt. Ein wichtiger Mechanismus der Signalübermittlung an der Synapse ist die Proteinphosphorylisation. An den synaptischen Vesikeln (Bläschen) finden sich im wesentlichen 3 Phosphoproteine die Synapsin I, Synapsin II, und Synaptophysin genannt werden. Dephosphoryliertes Synapsin I hält die Neurotransmittervesikel in einem Reservepool, wenn  Synapsin I phosphoryliert wird, verschwindet diese Speicherfunktion und die synaptischen Vesikel werden bereit für die Ausschüttung der Neurotransmitter.  Synapsine sind auch an der Bildung neuer Synapsen beteiligt. Das Neostriatum spielt eine wesentliche Rolle in der Entstehung der Parkinsonkrankheit und der Schizophrenie. Dort findet sich in besonderem Maße Das Phosphoprotein DARPP-32. DARPP-32 spielt eine große Rolle bei der Integration vieler dort eintreffender Neurotransmittersignale. Bestimmte Neurotransmittersignale führen zu einer Phosphorylisierung und andere bei der Dephosphorylisierung von DARPP-32.   Die phosphorylisierte Form, aber nicht die dephosphorylisierte Form, von DARPP-32 hemmt eine Proteinphosphatase, die wiederum verschiedene Ionenkanäle und -pumpen kontrolliert. Die Wirkung vieler Neurotransmitter wird über diese komplexe Signalkaskade gesteuert. Bei der Alzheimerkrankheit spielen ebenfalls Proteinkinasen und -Phosphorylisierungen eine wesentliche Rolle. Die Bildung extrazellulärer Amyloidablagerungen wird durch Aktivatoren der Proteinkinase C und Hemmern der Proteinphosphatases 1 und 2a reduziert. Möglicherweise ergeben sich hier zukünftige Ansatzpunkte für eine Behandlung. Paul Greengard 2003 Es sind verschiedene solcher Botenstoffe (Neurotransmitter)  bekannt, z.B.: Dopamin, Noradrenalin, GABA, Serotonin, Acethylcholin, Glycin, Glutamat, Endorphin,…Neben den “klassischen” Neurotransmitter spielen aber auch noch Neuropeptide( z.B.: Enkephalin, Endorphin, Substanz P, Vasopressin, Oxytocin, Vasoaktives Intestinales Polypeptid,.. ) und Hormone an der Synapse eine Rolle. Dopamine und einige andere Transmitter können ein Regulatorprotein, DARPP-32,  beeinflussen, dieses verändert indirekt die Funktion einer großen Zahl anderer Proteine („Schlüssel proteine“) . Das DARPP-32 Protein ist wie ein Leiter der eine Serie anderer Moleküle kontrolliert.  Form und Funktion der Proteine verändern sich durch Hinzufügen oder Wegnahme von Phosphatgruppen (Phosphorylierung bzw. Dephosphorylierung). Wenn DARPP-32 aktiviert wird ändern sich zahlreiche Ionenkanäle an den Synapsen in ihrer Funktion, dies gilt besonders für die schnellen Synapsen. Jede Nervenzelle benutzt zum Überbringen von Nachrichten nur einen bestimmten Botenstoff. Für jeden dieser Botenstoffe gibt es an der Zielzelle spezielle Rezeptoren. Für einige Überträgerstoffe gibt es mehrere unterschiedliche Rezeptoren. Rezeptoren sind in die Grundsubstanz eingebettete Proteine, die auf beiden Seiten der Membran herausragen. die Oberfläche des Rezeptors ist auf die Gestalt des Transmittermoleküls zugeschnitten; sie passen wie Schloß und Schlüssel zueinander. Die Nervenzellen werden dabei wie oben vermerkt in der Regel von mehreren anderen Zellen gleichzeitig angesprochen. Je mehr Zellen eine bestimmte Botschaft senden, desto schneller wird die angesprochene darauf reagieren. Um eine Überreaktion zu verhindern, können sie sich über eine zwischengeschaltete Zelle selbst „abschalten“. Sie bilden den Angriffspunkt für verschiedene Medikamente aber auch für Gifte. Störbar oder verbesserbar ist die Übertragung bereits bei der Synthese des Transmitters, der Speicherung und der Freisetzung des Transmitters, der Reaktion des Transmitters mit „seinem“ Rezeptor und dem Abbruch der Wirkung. Medikamente wie Gifte haben dabei verschiedene Möglichkeiten der Beeinflussung: die Vesikelentleerung kann gehemmt werden oder eine vollständige Entleerung ausgelöst werden. Hemmung der Wiederaufnahme der Spaltprodukte ins Endknöpfchen ( Wiederaufnahme oder reuptake Hemmer), Hemmung der Resynthese oder Speicherung, Hemmung des Transmitterabbaus, Blockierung der Rezeptoren durch „falsche“ Transmitter, Agonisten können den Effekt des Transmitters imitieren, Antagonisten blockieren die Bindung und öffnen die Ionenkanäle nicht. Selbstverständlich haben die Neurotransmitter nicht nur erregende Funktion, sondern genau so wichtig auch hemmende.Hemmende und erregende Synapsen bewirken eine Verrechnung durch räumliche und zeitliche Summation. Nur wenn das Ergebnis der Verrechnung aller Synapsen eine überschwellige Depolarisierung am Axonhügel des Zellkörpers bewirkt, leitet das Axon  eine Erregung weiter. Eine Störung der Balance zwischen Erregung und Inhibition ist die Ursache vieler neurologischer Erkrankungen von M. Parkinson bis Epilepsie. Die medikamentöse Behandlung beruht hier weitgehend auf einem Konzept, das auf Interaktionen von chemischen Synapsen aufbaut.

Erinnerung, Merkfähigkeit und Gedächtnis sind fundamentale geistige Vorgänge, ohne Gedächtnis wären wir nur zu einfachen Reflexen und schematischem einfachstem Verhalten in der Lage. Lernen setzt Gedächtnis voraus. Ein Nachlassen des Gedächtnisses ist eines der wichtigsten Symptome einer Demenz. Störungen des Gedächtnisses führen deshalb zu elementaren Einschränkungen und sind deshalb auch von großem Interesse. Merkfähigkeit und Gedächtnis sind synonym für Veränderungen des Verhaltens durch Erfahrung, Lernen ist wesentlich ein Prozess bei dem Erinnerungen erworben werden. Nach diesen Definitionen gibt es verschiedene Arten des Gedächtnisses. Einige Teile des Gedächtnisses speichern Ereignisse und Fakten und sind direkt dem Bewusstsein zugänglich. Diesen Teil nennt man das deklarative Gedächtnis. Einen anderen Teil des Gedächtnisses nennt man das ‘‘prozedurale Gedächtnis,’’ dieser Teil ist nicht direkt dem Bewusstsein zugänglich. Dieser Teil ist dafür zuständig erworbene Fertigkeiten zu nutzen. Wir verbessern unsere Fertigkeiten durch Übung. Durch Training verbessern sich unsere Fähigkeiten Auto zu fahren oder zu Schwimmen. Auch soziale Handlungsabläufe werden prozedural automatisiert. Sie sind damit durch Lernen erworben, aber nicht mehr unbedingt in der Erinnerung an die angenehmen oder traumatischen Erfahrungen, bei denen sie erworben wurden, geknüpft, sondern sind Teil der Persönlichkeit geworden.  Das deklarative Gedächtnis. und das prozedurale Gedächtnis sind unabhängig von einander. Es gibt Menschen bei denen nur das deklarative Gedächtnis oder nur das prozedurale Gedächtnis beeinträchtigt ist. Aus letzterer Tatsache folgern Neurowissenschaftler, dass es für beide Arten des Gedächtnisses unterschiedliche biologische Grundlagen geben muss und dass beide Arten in unterschiedlichen Hirngebieten lokalisiert sein müssen. Das Großhirn und der Hippocampus sind für das deklarative Gedächtnis verantwortlich, das Kleinhirn für das prozedurale Gedächtnis. Man geht davon aus, dass die Informationsspeicher des Gehirns überwiegend an den Synapse sitzen, dort wo Nervenzellen kommunizieren. Veränderungen an den Synapsen (synaptische Plastizität) werden als biologische Grundlage des Gedächtnisses angesehen. Der zugrunde liegende Mechanismus ist bisher nur zum Teil bekannt. Früher glaubte man, dass sich Lerninhalte in Eiweißen verschlüsseln, inzwischen weiß man, dass hierfür die Ausbildung und der Abbau von erregenden und hemmenden Synapsen genutzt wird.  Wesentliche Erkenntnisse stammen dabei aus der Forschung an der Meeresschnecke Aplysia. Der Nobelpreisträger Kendal löste bei der Schnecke immer wieder einen Schutzreflex aus, bis das Tier sich an den Reiz gewöhnt hatte und sein Verhalten änderte. Dieses einfache Lernverhalten des Tieres führte zu Veränderungen an den Synapsen. Wurde das Tier nur oberflächlich gereizt, war lediglich das Kurzzeitgedächtnis betroffen, bei stärkeren Provokationen bildete sich über Wochen eine Art Langzeitgedächtnis.  Kandel geht davon aus, dass diese Prozesse auch bei höheren Tieren und im Menschen ablaufen. Zumindest bei Mäusen gelang der Nachweis.  Je mehr Synapsen benutzt werden um so schneller leiten sie die Signale weiter. Bei Sensibilisierung auf bestimmte Reize, wird der Signalstoff cAMP (cyklisches Adenosin-Mono-Phosphat) vermehrt gebildet. Er verhindert die Öffnung von Ionenkanälen, die den Ruhezustand wieder herstellen. Dadurch kann die Nervenzelle bei Erregung mehr Transmitter ausschütten und wird für bestimmte Reize empfänglicher. Nun kann eine Reaktion leichter ausgelöst werden- ein Lernvorgang war erfolgreich. Synapsen die nicht benutzt werden sterben wieder ab, dadurch werden die Kommunikationswege schneller und effektiver. Neue Dendriten, Axone und daran Synapsen bilden sich. Das Wachsen neuer Neuriten aus denen später Axone oder Dendriten werden beginnt mit der Aktivierung von Membranrezeptoren durch extrazelluläre Schlüsselreize. Dieses Rezeptoren aktivieren eine intrazelluläre Kaskade, die Veränderungen im Aktinzytoskelet hervorruft, die die dortige Symmetrie verändern. Dann werden durch Regulation der Gentranskription, der Mikrotubuli und der Membrandynamik ausgelöst, die den neuen Neuriten stabilisieren.  Hierdurch entsteht die Plastizität des Gehirns und die Möglichkeit zu lernen. Synaptische Plastizität ist damit die zellbiologische Grundlage von Lernen und Gedächtnis. Lernen wird so zu einer Substanzveränderung. Lernprozesse verstärken oder verdünnen also die synaptischen Kontakte zwischen den Zellen und lassen auf diese Weise bestimmte Netzwerke im Gehirn entstehen. Für die Entstehung einer Form von Kurzzeitgedächtnis spielt die Phosphorylierung in der Synapse eine wichtige Rolle. Für die Entstehung eines Langzeitgedächtnisses ist außerdem die Neubildung von Proteinen erforderlich, die u.a. dazu führen, daß sich Form und Funktion der Synapse ändern. Lernen, Gedächtnis, die Sprache und die Entwicklung der Persönlichkeit, haben eine ständige Neu-Verknüpfung synaptischer Verbindungen zur Grundlage. Die Funktion des Nervensystem wird durch eine komplexe sich ständig verändernde Architektur neuronaler Netzwerke bestimmt. Diese Komplexität entsteht durch die enorme dreidimensionale Verzweigtheit der einzelnen Neurone in der Entwicklung des Gehirns. Entscheidend ist dabei dass die Neurone zur rechten Zeit in die richtige Richtung  wachsen und sich dort mit den richtigen zugehörigen Neuronen über Synapsen verbinden können. Es gibt entsprechend je nach Hirnregion ganz unterschiedliche Neurone mit ganz unterschiedlichen Verzweigungen (Dendriten und Axonen).  Neure Studien zeigen, dass exogen zugeführte Neurotrophine einen Antidepressiva- ähnlichen Effekt haben., Die Neurotrophinausschüttung ist umgekehrt unter der Gabe von Antidepressiva erhöht. Neurotrophine könnten so über Antidepressiva die Bildung und Stabilisierung von synaptischen Verbindungen bewirken. Über diesen Mechanismus könnten Neurotrophine für den depressionslösenden und stimmungstabilisierenden Effekt der Medikamente verantwortlich sein.  T. Saarelainen, P. Hendolin, G. Lucas, E. Koponen, M. Sairanen, E. MacDonald, K. Agerman, A. Haapasalo, H. Nawa, R. Aloyz, P. Ernfors, and E. Castren, Activation of the TrkB Neurotrophin Receptor Is Induced by Antidepressant Drugs and Is Required for Antidepressant-Induced Behavioral Effects, J. Neurosci., January 1, 2003; 23(1): 349 – 357. [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] Synaptische Vesikelproteine: Nervenzellen haben verschiedene Arten von Speicherorganellen für Neurotransmitter, (kleine synaptische Vesikel und große Vesikel mit elektronendichtem Kern). Synaptische Vesikelproteine spielen vermutlich eine wesentliche Rolle bei der Steuerung der neuronalen Plastizität und damit der Entstehung psychiatrischer Erkrankungen, sie beeinflussen die Regulation des Neurotransmitterumsatzes. Der Nervenarzt, 2004, 628 – 632. Synapsin Synaptisches Vesikelprotein, Phosphoprotein (und synaptisches Vesikelprotein) reguliert die Beziehungen zwischen synaptischen Vesikeln und dem Zytoskelett und damit die die gerichtete Bewegung des Vesikels innerhalb der Zelle. Spielt möglicherweise beim Axonwachstum eine Rolle. Die Gen-Deletion des synaptischen Vesikelproteins Synapsin-1 hemmt bei Mäusen ebenfalls das Axonwachstum.
Synaptobrevin (VAMP) ist  ein Synaptisches Vesikelprotein, wie Synaptotagmin ein vesikelassoziiertes Membranprotein wie dieses am Docking (Anheften des Vesikels an die präsynaptische Membran) beteiligt. Grundvoraussetzung für die synaptische Transmission ist der SNARE-Komplex, der durch Bindung von Synaptobrevin an die Plasmamembranproteine SNAP-25 und Syntaxin 1a entsteht. Bindet sich das Synaptobrevin an das Vesikelprotein Synaptophysin, entsteht der Synaptobrevin/Synapto-physin-Komplex. Der Synaptobrevin/Synaptophysin-Komplex kann sich veränderten synaptischen Aktivitäten anpassen. Damit Synaptobrevin mit den vesikel-assozierten Syntaxin 1a und SNAP-25 keine unerwünschte cis-SNARE-Komplexbildung eingeht, wird „bindendes“ Synaptophysin benötigt. Vor allem bei erhöhter neuronaler Aktivität stellt der Synaptobrevin/Synaptophysin-Komplex eine Art Reserve für Synaptobrevin dar. Synaptotagmin Synaptisches Vesikelprotein, membranverankertes Protein, (Synaptische Vesikelprotein) 13 verschiedene Synaptotagmine die in 6 Klassen eingeteilt werden , sind bekannt, sie regulieren das Anhaften der Vesikel an die präsynaptische Membran es ist ein Vermittler der Membranfusion. Vesikuläres Synaptotagmin, ein Kalziumsensor der Transmitterfreisetzung, hat keinen Einfluß auf das Axonwachstum. Synaptophysin membranintegriertes Glykoprotein an präsynaptischen Vesikeln von Neuronen, 6–8% aller Synaptische Vesikelproteine. Synaptophysin nimmt während gesteigerter synaptischer Aktivität eine modulierende Rolle ein, indem es die Verfügbarkeit von Synaptobrevin während der Exozytose reguliert. Synaptophysin kann als Modulator verstanden werden, der die Effizienz von Synapsen während der Entwicklung, aber auch bei erhöhter Anforderung wie physiologischen oder pathologischen Bedingungen beeinflußt. Auf diese Weise stellt Synaptophysin einen Indikator auf der Ebene synaptischer Vesikel für synaptische Plastizität dar. Britta Hinz, Untersuchungen zur physiologischen Relevanz des Synaptobrevin/Synaptophysin-Komplexes, 2002 www.dissertation.de

Veränderungen der neuronalen Organisation im Temporallappen scheinen bei der Schizophrenie eine wichtige Rolle zu spielen. Viele Studien zeigen dort eine Verminderung der synaptischen Protein messenger RNS und entsprechend auch der von dieser produzierten Proteine. Die Dichte der Synapsen in diesem Bereich scheint dabei reduziert, vermutlich bestehen dort auch andere Veränderungen der synaptischen Verschaltungen der Neurone. Bei der Entstehung einer Schizophrenie sind vermutlich mehrere verschiedene Gene beteiligt. Eine neuere Studie zeigt an den Nervenzellen im Temproallappen der Gehirnen verstorbener Patienten mit einer Schizophrenie einen erheblichen Unterschied in der relativen Genexpression von mehr als 18 000 Genen im Vergleich zu den Gehirnen von Kontrollpersonen. Besonders interessant sind dabei die Veränderungen an den verschiedenen mit dem G-Protein gekoppelten Rezeptorsignaltransskripten mit Einfluss auf die Neurotransmitterausschüttung und Aktivierung von second messengers. Vielleicht ermöglichen diese Veränderungen der Genexpression und die daraus resultierenden Veränderungen der Eiweiße irgendwann eine Labordiagnose der Erkrankung oder gar der Menschen bei denen ein besonders hohes Risiko besteht zu erkranken. S.E. Hemby et al Arch. Gen Psychiatry; 59;2002;631 ff

.

neuroanatomische und neurochemische Korrelate einzelner Symptome
Symptom Lokalisation Neurotransmitter
Aufmerksamkeitsstörung Hirnstamm (Formatio reticularis), Präfrontale Rinde, rechte parietale Rinde DA, NA, ACh, GABA, Glutamat
Gedächtnisstörung Subkortikale Regionen des Temporallappens (Hippocampus) und des Zwischenhirns (vorderer
Thalamus, Corpora mamillaria)
ACh, NA, 5-HT, DA, NMDA
Desorientiertheit Rechte präfrontale Rinde DA, NA, ACh,
Störung der Exekutivfunktionen Präfrontaler Rinde DA, NA, Ach, GABA
Schlafstörungen Hirnstamm (Formatio reticularis) Subkortikale Regionen (Ncl. suprachiasmaticus hypothalami) NA, ACh, 5-HT
Wahnsymptome Rechte parietale Rinde, linke temporale und mesiofrontale Rinde DA, 5-HT, Glutamat, ACh
Halluzinationen, Illusionen Temporale, parietale, okzipitale Rinde,  Pedunculi cerebri mesencephali DA, NA, 5-HT,ACh
Euphorie, Erfolgsempfinden, Hirnbelohnungsystem ventrale tegmentale Area, N. accumbens, frontaler Cortex, Amygdala und das mesolimbische dopaminerge System O, DA, 5-HT
Zwänge rechten Nukleus caudatus, rechte ventrolaterale präfrontale Hirnrinde,  beidseitige orbitofrontale Hirnrinde und im Thalamus. 5-HT, DA,
sexuelles Verhalten mediale präoptische Area (MPOA),  die medialen Amygdala (AME), der mediale Hypothalamus (VMH), und die ventrale tegmentale Area (VTA). NO, DA, 5-HT, NA, O,
O= Opiate, Endorphine DA = Dopamin, NA = Noradrenalin, ACh = Acetylcholin, 5-HT = Serotonin, GABA = Gamma-Amino-Buttersäure, NMDA = N-Methyl-DAspartat, NO = Stickstoff. modifiziert nach  E. HILGER ET AL.Pathophysiologische Korrelate deliranter Syndrome J Neurol Neurochir Psychiatr 2002; 3 (3): 32–40 und H. Snyder, MD, Forty Years of Neurotransmitters, A Personal Account, Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2002;59:983-994ABSTRACT FULL TEXT PDF

Für die Funktion des Gehirns scheinen weniger die Anzahl der Nervenzellen, als die Zahl deren Verknüpfungen wesentlich. Die Verminderung der Anzahl der Nervenzellen scheint manchmal sogar Bedingung für deren gute Funktion. Dabei ist das Wechselspiel zwischen Erregung in einer Hirnregion und gleichzeitiger Hemmung in einer anderen Region entscheidend. Für eine gute reibungslose Funktion des Gehirns ist Bedingung, dass bei es bei jeder Aktivierung eine Hemmung an anderer Stelle gibt. Die Verknüpfungen der Nervenzellen (Synapsen) ist entscheidend für die Speicherung komplexer Informationen und Gefühle. Wenn Synapsen besonders häufig benutzt werden, wird deren Funktion über verschiedene Mechanismen weiter gebahnt.  Nervenzellen verstärken ihre Verbindungen bevorzugt dann, wenn die neuronale Aktivität zwischen ihnen korreliert ist, also gleichzeitig stattfindet. Training und Lernen führen bereits nach kurzer Zeit zu einer cortikalen Reorganisation, die man auch als Nutzungs- oder Erfahrungsabhängige Plastizität bezeichnet. Eine MEG- Untersuchung zeigte, dass alleine passive Stimulierung des Zeigfingers an 2 verschiedenen Punkten das für den Zeigfinger zuständige rezeptive Feld innerhalb von Stunden vergrößert und dort neue Verbindungen hergestellt werden, bei gleichzeitiger Verbessserung der 2-Punktdiskrimination. Dies auch als rein passiver Vorgang ohne bewusstes Lernen. B. Godde et al. 2003 Es gibt spezielle Rezeptoren für diese Gleichzeitigkeit, spezielle Glutamatrezeptoren in der postsynaptischen Membran, die NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartat)- Rezeptoren, spielen dabei eine besondere Rolle.  Nicht benutzte Synapsen dagegen werden von den Gliazellen abgebaut.  Erfahrungen und Lernen ebenso wie traumatische Ereignisse führen so zu Substanzveränderungen im Gehirn, die mit neuen bildgebenden Verfahren sichtbar gemacht werden können. Lernen und Gedächtnis schaffen also neue und veränderte Synapsen, man könnte auch sagen, unser Gedächtnis sitzt in der ständigen Kommunikation der Nervenzellen über Synapsen. Wenn Menschen miteinander sprechen, kommuniziert das eine Gehirn mit dem anderen, erzeugt dort anatomische Veränderungen und umgekehrt.“(Kendal). Es verwundert deshalb nicht, dass funktionelle Kernspinaufnahmen bei Wirkung einer Psychotherapie ähnliche Veränderungen im Gehirn und damit auch an den Synapsen zeigen, wie dies bei Behandlung mit Psychopharmaka der Fall ist.  Lernvorgänge und Gedächtnisleistungen spielen sich auf der zellulären Ebene ab. Ein Modell für einen zellulären Lernmechanismus ist die Langzeitpotenzierung (LTP) im Gegensatz zur Kurzzeitpotenzierung (STP). Vorübergehende synaptische Plastizität nennt man Kurzzeitpotenzierung (STP)( short-term potentiation) oder das Gegenteil  short-term depression, STD) sie spielt bei der Aufmerksamkeitslenkung, dem Arbeitsgedächtnis oder der Kontexterfassung ein Rolle. Bei der LTP geht es um die Konsolidierung also um dauerhafte Lernprozesse. LTP scheint die Basis für das fast unerschöpfliche Reservoir unseres Gedächtnis und vieler anderer Vorgänge im Gehirn zu sein. LTP passiert an allen erregenden Synapsen, die meiste Forschung dazu konzentriert sich aber auf den Hypocampus und die CA1 Synapsen die überwiegend mit dem Neurotransmitter Glutamat arbeiten. Unzweifelhaft findet der Vorgang aber auch in der Hirnrinde statt. Möglicherweise findet die LTP in der Rinde und im Hippocampus aber mit unterschiedlichen Mechaninsmen statt. Im Hippocampus scheint die Zunahme der synaptischen Feuerung eine größere Rolle zu spielen, als der Umbau der Synapsen, in der Rinde umgekehrt. Eine Langzeitpotenzierung kommt durch die langanhaltende Bahnung synaptischer Übertragung nach einer Aktivierung der Synapse durch intensive hochfrequente Stimulation des präsynaptischen Neuron zustande. Experimente mit Stimulationen durch hochfrequente Stromimpulse im Bereich des Hippocampus über mehrere Sekunden zeigten, dass selbst nach einigen Tagen die Reizung durch Stromimpulse niedriger Intensität noch gebahnt war. LTP wird über repetitive (wiederholte) Aktivierung N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Rezeptoren getriggert. Eine wesentliche Rolle dabei spielen A-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPA) Rezeptoren, die Einfluss auf die Durchlässigkeit der Na und K- Kanäle nehmen und einen Einwärtsstrom erzeugen, der das Ruhemembranpotential verändert. Während der LTP wird vermutlich der AMPA Rezeptor in seiner Lokalisation verändert, auch die Zahl der Rezeptoren scheint zuzunehmen.  Die Kurzzeitplastizität führt nicht zu strukturellen Veränderungen, bei der LTP kommt es zu Veränderungen der Proteinsynthese, zu einem synaptischen Remodelling und zu infrastrukturellen Veränderungen in Zellprozessen. Bei der LTP wird durch einen von außen zugeführten Reiz die Nervenzellantwort dauerhaft verändert, möglicherweise entsprechend einem Lernerfolg. Grundlage dieser dauerhaften Veränderung sind Membranrezeptoren, die auf bestimmte korrelierte Nervenreize reagieren. Zudem scheinen auch morphologische Zellmodifikationen zur dauerhaften Zustandsveränderung beizutragen. Zwei häufig untersuchte Phänomene, die solche Veränderungen in vitro zeigen, sind die Langzeit-Verstärkung (long-term potentiation; LTP und Langzeit-Abschwächung (long-term depression; LTD) synaptischer Transmission. Die Tatsache, daß LTP und LTD durch korrelierte Aktivität prä- und postsynaptischer Nervenzellen induziert werden, sollte für die Spezifität synaptischer Veränderungen sorgen, das heißt dafür, daß lediglich solche Synapsen verstärkt werden, die während des Induktionsprozesses aktiv waren. Neuere Untersuchungen zeigen allerdings, daß sich nach aktivitätsabhängiger Modifikation einer Gruppe von Synapsen die Übertragungseigenschaften in benachbarten Synapsen ebenfalls verändern. Die attraktivste Erklärung für eine solche unspezifische Ausbreitung synaptischer Veränderungen sind diffundierende Botenstoffe, die am Ort der Induktion freigesetzt werden und dann auch Synapsen in der unmittelbaren Nachbarschaft beeinflussen. Dorit Polnau, Dr.Albrecht Kossel  Lernen und Erinnern, DNP · 11/02 ,NWG 1/00 Die Gene, die die LPT und LPD regulieren sind offensichtlich Vitamin A abhängig. Vitamin A spielt damit bei der Plastizität des Gehirns eine große Rolle. In unseren Breiten dürfte das eine geringe Rolle spielen, da die generelle Versorgung sehr gut ist, in Entwicklungsländern könnte dies mit ein Grund für geistige Entwicklungsverzögerungen sein. D. L. Misner et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, Vol. 98, Issue 20, 11714-11719, September 25, 2001) LTP wird durch Schlafmangel behindert, was Schwierigkeiten bei der Konsolidierung von Gedächtnisinhalten bei Schlafmangel erklärt. Zumindest im Tierexperiment fördert körperliche Aktivität die LTP, die hippocampale Neurogenese, die synaptische Plastizität, und damit auch die Gedächtnisbildung und Lernvorgänge. Ergebnisse von Studien weisen darauf hin, dass dies auch bei Menschen gilt. Entwicklungsgeschichtlich ist es ein großer Vorteil, wenn eine Spezies ängstlich auf Gefahren reagiert. Auf der Suche nach den Genen, die die Erzeugung von Angst ermöglichen haben Forscher im lateralen Kern der Amygdala 2 Gene identifiziert, das gastrinrelated Peptid und Stathmin. Es gelang den Forschern so genannte Knockout Mäuse zu züchten, die kein Stathmin haben. Diese Mäuse sind furchtlos, sie haben keine instinktive Furcht vor gefährlicher Umgebung, wie offenem Gelände oder Erhöhungen, die sonst von Mäusen gemieden werden. In der Wildnis wären sie so schnell zum Opfer von Füchsen, Katzen oder Raubvögeln geworden.  Sie erinnern auch keine aversiven Reize, die normale Mäuse lernen. Die Forscher konnten klären, dass Stathmin die Dynamik der Mikrotubulusbildung im lateralen Kern der Amygdala hemmt. Die Mikrotubuli der Amygdala der Knockout Mäuse waren damit stabiler oder weniger flexibel.  Für die Speicherung neuer Gedächtnisinhalte werden normalerweise neue Synapsen gebildet, dies erfordert einen Umbau der Mikrotubuli. Bestätigend fanden die Forscher auch eine signifikante Abnahme der Langzeitpotentiation in den Kortiko-Amygdala und Thalamoamygdala – Schaltkreisen dieser Knockout Mäuse. Stathmin gibt es auch beim Menschen, ob es bei Menschen und anderen Säugetieren in den Amygdala die selbe Funktion hat, ist noch nicht bekannt. LTP spielt auch bei der Drogensucht eine wesentliche Rolle, was beispielsweise an Ratten denen man Morphin verabreicht hat nachgewiesen wurde.  Das ventrale Tegmental-Areal (VTA) befindet sich im Mittelhirn in der Nachbarschaft der Substantia nigra und hat einen Einfluss auf das dopaminerge Belohnungssystem. Von der VTA gehen normalerweise hemmende Einflüsse auf das Belohnungssystem aus, bei denen LTP-Phänomene eine Rolle spielen. Sie verhindern eine gesteigerte Freisetzung von Dopamin. Schon eine einzige Gabe von Morphin brachte dieses Gleichgewicht bei Ratten durcheinander. Die LTP war gestört, die Freisetzung von Dopamin verstärkt und so die Gefahr einer Abhängigkeit erhöht. Die Wirkung war noch 24 Stunden nach der Injektion nachweisbar. Die Morphingabe führt zu einem Lernprozess, der wenn er anhält, etwa nach weiterem Morphinkonsum, das Suchtverhalten erklären kann. Beteiligt sind bestimmte Rezeptoren (GABA-A) sowie das Enzym Guanylatzyklase. Medikamente, die hier angreifen, könnten möglicherweise die Drogensucht im Anfangsstadium behandeln oder sogar verhindern.  Fereshteh S. Nugent, Esther C. Penick, Julie A. Kauer: Opioids block long-term potentiation of inhibitory synapses Nature 446, 1086-1090 (26 April 2007) Shumyatsky, G. P.et al. stathmin, a gene enriched in the amygdala, controls both learned and innate fear. Cell 123,697–709 (2005)  I. G. Campbell, M. J. Guinan, and J. M. Horowitz, Sleep Deprivation Impairs Long-Term Potentiation in Rat Hippocampal Slices, J Neurophysiol, August 1, 2002; 88(2): 1073 – 1076.[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] C. Cirelli, Functional Genomics of Sleep and Circadian Rhythm: Invited Review: How sleep deprivation affects gene expression in the brain: a review of recent findings, J Appl Physiol, January 1, 2002; 92(1): 394 – 400. [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] H. van Praag, B. R. Christie, T. J. Sejnowski, and F. H. Gage Running enhances neurogenesis, learning, and long-term potentiation in mice PNAS, November 9, 1999; 96(23): 13427 – 13431. [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] K. Yaffe, D. Barnes, M. Nevitt, L.-Y. Lui, and K. Covinsky A Prospective Study of Physical Activity and Cognitive Decline in Elderly Women: Women Who Walk, Archives of Internal Medicine, July 23, 2001; 161(14): 1703 – 1708. [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] G. Kempermann Why New Neurons? Possible Functions for Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis J. Neurosci., February 1, 2002; 22(3): 635 – 638. [Full Text] [PDF]

Die Bedeutung wird auch dadurch deutlich, dass sich die Gene und damit auch der Bauplan des Körpers wie des Gehirns zwischen Menschen und Affen zu 98% gleichen, dass aber Menschen offensichtlich wesentlich mehr die Produkte dieser Gene (eben bestimmter Eiweiße) nutzen. Erfahrungen und Erlebnisse verändern damit nicht nur die Anzahl und den Ort der Verbindungsstellen zwischen Nervenzellen, sie verändern auch die Gene der Zelle und die wichtige Funktion dieser Gene. Auch über diesen Mechanismus werden Erfahrungen zu bleibenden immer besser sichtbar zu machenden Teilen der Person. Lernvorgänge führen zum Anschalten von Genen, die sonst nicht genutzt würden. Eine multimodale Stimulation verstärkt damit neuronale Netze, vorausgesetzt sie verursacht nicht zuviel Stress und überfordert nicht. Eine interessante Umwelt und die Gesellschaft von Menschen fördert damit nicht nur die Verschaltung der Synapsen sondern verändert auch die Genaktivität der einzelnen Nervenzellen. Einen wesentliches Resultat ist dabei enorme Zahl verschiedener Neuropeptide(> 40) deren Verteilung im Gehirn sich ständig nach den Lernerfahrungen und Anforderungen ändert.  Auch Neuropeptide sind chemische Botenstoffe die Informationen im Nervensystem vermitteln. Neuropeptide findet man in besonders großer Zahl im Hypothalamus, der Hypophyse, den endokrinen Drüsen und im Verdauungssystem. Peptidtransmitter sind beispielsweise Enkephalin, CGRP, VIP und Cholecystokinin. Eintönigkeit behindert,  die auch beim Erwachsenen wichtige Gehirnentwicklung. Nicht benutzte Synapsen bilden sich auch teilweise wieder zurück. Im Laufe der Zeit tritt bei Nichtbenutzung ein systematischer Gedächtniszerfall, der exponentielles Verhalten zeigt, ein. Dieser exponentielle Verlauf deutet natürlich darauf hin, daß es keine physischen Erklärung für den Spurenzerfall gibt, sondern dieser psychologischer Natur ist. Irgendwie muß sich also über die Zeit die Trägerstruktur verändern. Wie sich denn auch an neurophysiologischen Studien zeigen läßt, schwächen sich tatsächlich die synaptische Übertragung bei einer längeren Nichterregung ab. Genau wie Muskelgewebe verkümmern neuronale Verbindungen also mit der Zeit, wenn die sie erneuernde Eiweißreproduktion auf einem sehr niedrigen aktivitätsorientierten Niveau vollzogen wird. In der Summe kann man deshalb sagen, unsere Gene prägen uns zwar in vielerlei Hinsicht, wir sind aber nicht die Sklaven unserer Gene.

G- Protein

G-Protein spielen sowohl prä- als auch postsynaptisch eine Rolle. Präsynaptisch regulieren sie an manchen Stellen die Freisetzung der Neurotransmitter, postsynaptisch aktiviert das G-Protein ein Enzym, welches aus ATP den sekundären Botenstoff cAMP synthetisiert. Es gibt mehrere hundert mit G-Protein verbundene Rezeptoren (GPCRs), die nach ihren spezifischen Sequenzhomologien in Klassen (A–D) eingeteilt werden,  Jeder GPCR wird spezifisch von einen unterschiedlichen Liganden aktiviert (Kationen, Monoamine, Neurotransmitter, Lipide, Riechmoleküle, Peptide und Proteine. GPCRs spielen in fast jedem physiologischen System des Körpers eine Rolle, (z.B.: endokrine Drüsen, kardiovaskuläres Systen und Hirnfunktion, Geschmacks- Geruchs- und Lichtwahrnehmung. Die Klasse A wird nach physiologischer Funktion eingeteilt. Ander GPCRs schließen fungale Pheromonrezeptoren (Klasse D) und Dictyostelium cAMP- Rezeptoren  (Klasse E) ein.

mit G-Protein verbundene Rezeptoren (GPCRs)
Klasse A
Endokrin Oxytocin, Gonadotropin, Prostaglandin, LH, Melanocortin, Thyreotropin, Adrenomedullin, Melatonin, GRH, TRH, FSH, Somatostatin
Neurotransmitter Muskarinisch, Neuropeptid Y, Neurotensin, Serotonin, Opioid, Adrenerg, Dopamin, Olfaktorische Rezeptoren, Rhodopsin
Kardiovaskulär Angiotensin, Bradykinin, Endothelin, Tachykinin, Vasopressin, Thrombin
Andere Histamin, Chemokin, Interleukin, Purinrezeptor
Klasse B Calcitonin, Parathormon, GRH, CRH PACAP, Sekretin, Glukagon, vasoaktives intestinales Peptid
Klasse C Metabotrope Glutamatrezeptoren, Kalzium-aufspürender Rezeptor, GABA-B

In a haunted world of heroin and hurt and heartless hustles, located between a dusty brickyard and rusty railroad tracks along the border of Chicago and blue-collar Cicero, Steve Kamenicky is the go-to guy.

Longtime addicts and novice users seek out Mr. Kamenicky, known as Pony Tail Steve, sometimes in the middle of the day, other times deep into the night. They go to him, usually in a panic, desperate for an injection for a fallen buddy or lover of what some call a miracle drug. They hurry over the paving bricks that Mr. Kamenicky neatly laid to lead the way to his tent, pitched among the tall weeds and trees in one of a string of small encampments of the homeless on the edge of the brickyard.

Mr. Kamenicky, 52, is not a dealer. His own heroin addiction is much too strong. He shoots every $10 bag of heroin he can.

But his fellow addicts consider Mr. Kamenicky a savior.

“I’ve saved more people than the paramedics,” he boasted the other evening as he sat in a Cicero parking lot, his long, salt-and-pepper ponytail snaking down his back.

The drug he administers to fellow heroin users is called Naloxone or Narcan, its brand name. Mr. Kamenicky estimated that in the last few years he had brought back from the deadly depths of heroin overdose at least 35 addicts — in abandoned buildings, crack houses and around kitchen tables.

Naloxone, which is injected, reverses the effects of an opiate overdose. A drug that was a few years ago given by doctors and paramedics, Naloxone is now directly dispensed to drug users like Mr. Kamenicky, who are trained by the Chicago Recovery Alliance and receive Naloxone through a doctor-supervised program. The effort is part of an up-from-the bottom movement in the struggle to rescue those addicted to heroin and other opiates.

“It saves lives,” said Dr. Virgilio Arenas, who leads the addiction division at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “Naloxone is an effective antidote. It works within minutes once administered.”

Mr. Kamenicky receives Naloxone free, as do drug users across the city, from the alliance, a nonprofit needle-exchange and H.I.V.-prevention program. The alliance also dispenses fresh syringes, condoms and other paraphernalia to users in the hope that they will stay alive long enough to make “any positive change,” the group’s mantra.

Dr. Arenas said there were similar “harm-reduction” projects in Milwaukee, New York and other cities where needles and Naloxone were distributed.

Not everyone endorses the effort. “Some people in the addiction field feel it might foster more drug use,” Dr. Arenas said, adding, “but I don’t think people will use more because they have the antidote. I favor the harm-reduction approach.”

Anecdotal evidence suggests that the Naloxone campaign is saving lives in the Chicago metropolitan area, which led the nation in heroin-related hospital emergency-room visits from 2004 to 2008, according to a recent study. The Illinois Consortium on Drug Policy at Roosevelt University found that there were 23,931 such cases during that period, 50 percent more than were reported in New York City, which ranked second.

Dan Bigg, director and co-founder of the Chicago Recovery Alliance, said the group had collected about 2,000 reports of overdose reversals since 2001 when it began widely dispensing Naloxone to addicts — and even to family members, including one Lake Forest mother, who keeps a vial in her home in case her heroin-addicted daughter has another overdose.

“She wants a living daughter,” Mr. Bigg said, “despite whatever potential challenges she might bring in terms of struggling with drugs or education or marriage or anything else.”

Mr. Bigg said he had used Naloxone to reverse five overdoses. Greg Scott, a sociology professor at DePaul University and the recovery alliance’s research director, said he had reversed 24 overdoses, including a case two years ago when he used Naloxone on Mr. Kamenicky.

For years, Professor Scott has been documenting life in the “Brickyard,” Mr. Kamenicky’s encampment. In the last three years, he said, he has interviewed up to 300 suburban residents who come to the Brickyard to use the heroin they buy in surrounding neighborhoods before slipping back into mainstream society.

Mr. Scott said he had interviewed suburban housewives, hard-driving commodities traders and “weekend warriors,” who shoot up and get a thrill from hanging out at the Brickyard. He said the traders were the least responsive to his offers of Naloxone.

They don’t want to admit they might have a problem,” he said.

Mr. Scott, 42, has also been on the other end of the needle. He said he was addicted to opiates until a few years ago, overdosing on three occasions. Each time, he said, the overdose was reversed by Naloxone.

“It really is a kind of miracle drug,” he said.

Not everyone is as lucky as Mr. Kamenicky or Mr. Scott. In 2008, the most recent year for which statistics are available, there were 390 opiate-related overdose deaths in Cook County, up from 280 in 2007, said Dr. Nancy Jones, the Cook County medical examiner.

Dr. Jones said it was impossible to say how many might have been saved by Naloxone and not “end up on my table.”

The Chicago Recovery Alliance dispenses Naloxone from a fleet of silver panel trucks, which are parked in designated spots around the city every day. One truck recently sat baking in the sun at 61st Street and Calumet Avenue. Cheryl Hull, an alliance employee, has dispensed syringes, advice and compassion from the trucks for nearly 17 years.

Ms. Hull said she gave addicts a bottle of Naloxone and a DVD instructing them on its use. For those without DVD players or places to watch, Ms. Hull pops a disc into the truck’s portable player. Many people do not take the time to watch the instructions, she said, adding that young suburbanites were the most reluctant to linger and learn because they were afraid of the police and city crime.

On Wednesday night, Mr. Kamenicky sat on a plastic bucket, waiting for the alliance truck at a Cicero parking lot. He said it felt good to save a life, to give someone a second chance.

“I’ve only lost one person,” he said.

The victim, he said, was his boss at a suburban print shop. The man started snorting a $10 bag of heroin and then lost consciousness. Mr. Kamenicky ran to find his miracle drug.

“But somebody took it,” he said. “I tried to get some other people to help me, but they were too busy getting high. They couldn’t be bothered.

“By the time I found some Narcan, it was too late. I gave him a shot, but he was already dead.”

Only a decade ago, a heroin epidemic threatened Japan. An estimated 40,000 addicts provided a market for the growing traffic in hard drugs, and some users brazenly mainlined on street corners in such areas as Yokohama s Kogane-cho (Gold Town). Today, says Dr. Yoshio Ishikawa of the Sengayaen mental hospital, heroin addiction „has become a subject without a living example for study, like smallpox,“ and medical students may finish their entire education without seeing an actual addict. Police and narcotics agents face the same triumphant scarcity.

Heroin use in Japan has been virtually eliminated by stringent enforcement of a 1963 law that provided for harsh handling of both pushers and addicts. A life sentence is meted out for selling butsu (the Japanese gangsters‘ untranslatable coinage for heroin). Mere possession can mean several years in jail. To cut off the demand, the government required that every user caught be confined for at least 30 days of treatment. The most Draconian fact—by American standards—is that each addict’s treatment begins with „cold turkey,“ or withdrawal unassisted by chemical crutches such as methadone.

The ordeal can be excruciating. Early in the process, which can take a week or ten days, the addict’s eyes water and his nose runs while sweat pours from his body. By the third day, he is likely to be wracked by severe intestinal cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and nerve spasms. Goose bumps cover his body; they make his skin resemble that of a plucked fowl and give the process its name in the U.S. Cold turkey is rarely fatal—the Japanese claim 100% survival for those treated in hospitals—but the urge to commit suicide can be strong.

Verge of Hell. Many U.S. physicians believe that such agony is neither necessary nor desirable. They prefer to assist the addict through his withdrawal with other drugs (TIME, Jan. 4, 1971) and even to keep a patient on a heroin substitute indefinitely if necessary. But the Japanese, who have always taken a puritanical attitude toward drugs, regard this as a continuation of addiction.

The country’s first antidrug law, adopted in the 1880s, prescribed zanshu, decapitation with a samurai sword, for those trafficking in narcotics. Opium eating, a major problem in 19th century China, never caught on in Japan. After World War II, however, heroin began to gain a foothold. Rival gangs pushed the drug among prostitutes and in the underworld generally bringing Japan to what Tokyo Social Worker Michmari Sugahara called „the verge of hell.“

The authorities moved to end heroin use before it spread to the country’s teenagers. A government-financed public relations campaign, assisted by the press, lectured the public on the drug’s social, moral and medical dangers. The 1963 statute persuaded drug abusers that the government meant business. Some pushers reacted to the new law by simply dropping out of the business. In some brothels, the gangsters themselves forced girls to go through cold turkey; those reluctant to kick the habit were sometimes tied to their beds until withdrawal symptoms ended. Others were put in government-run hospitals that had been constructed specifically for drug offenders.

The medical profession cooperated fully with law enforcement agencies, taking the attitude that addiction is not merely a personal medical problem but an offense against society. Says Tokyo Narcotics Agent Hiromasa Sato: „Addicts found no alternative but to capitulate, and eventually submitted to cold turkey. Sayonara.“

Not for Export. Drug abuse has not been completely eradicated, of course. Youngsters now go in for glue sniffing and amphetamines, and a heroin arrest is still made occasionally. But Japan’s success has been dramatic enough to awe visiting American experts. Can the Japanese system be exported to the U S.? Many U.S. experts think not. Japan’s population is homogeneous, generally law-abiding and, where national goals are concerned, responsive to official appeals for cooperation. Americans are far more heterogeneous and resistant to authoritarian preaching. The young, in particular, insist increasingly on asserting their „individual rights.“ Many officials feel that it would be difficult to get wide support for a system that emphasizes the punishing process of withdrawal.

Dr. Vincent Dole of New York’s Rockefeller University Hospital, a pioneer in the use of methadone, argues that physicians should relieve, not increase, the suffering of the heroin addict. Most drug users apparently agree. Addicts are far more likely to turn themselves in for treatment if chemical substitutes are offered than if the prospect is cold turkey. The flaws in that argument are that American treatment programs have a high relapse rate and that the addiction epidemic is nowhere near being checked in the U.S.

Empörung gegen Parlamentsbeschluß

Regierungsmehrheit will Costa Rica zur größten Basis der US-Marine machen

Von Torge Löding, San José

Das Parlament von Costa Rica hat einen Beschluß gefaßt, der das Land faktisch zur größten Basis der US-Marine in der Region machen könnte. Angeblich um den Drogenhandel zu bekämpfen, autorisierte die Mehrheit des Mitte-Rechts-Bündnisses von Präsidentin Laura Chinchilla die Anwesenheit von bis zu 7000 US-Marinesoldaten, 46 Kriegsschiffen, 200 Kampfhubschraubern (darunter Black Hawks), Flugzeugträgern und Düsenjets in nationalen Gewässern bzw auf dem Territorium. Mit Polizeivollmacht ausgestattet, soll es den US-Soldaten gestattet werden, »Verdächtige« festzunehmen und außer Landes zu bringen.

»Damit betreibt die Regierung Verfassungsbruch. Als Opposition haben wir vor dem Verfassungsgericht Beschwerde eingelegt«, sagte der Abgeordnete der Linkspartei Frente Amplio (»Breite Front«) José Maria Villalta gegenüber junge Welt. Ende des vergangenen Jahres war eine vor zehn Jahren beschlossene Vereinbarung zur gemeinsamen Patrouille der Küstenwache beider Länder abgelaufen, diese versuchte das Regierungslager nun auszuweiten.

Doch so schnell wird die Angelegenheit nicht vom Tisch sein, denn Militärpräsenz in Costa Rica ist ein heikles Thema. Nach einem sechswöchigen Bürgerkrieg wurde das eigene Militär 1948 abgeschafft, und im nationalen Selbstverständnis sehen sich die Costaricaner als besonders friedliebend. Obwohl es bereits unter den vergangenen zwei Regierungen zur Aufrüstung der Polizei gekommen war und das Land als treuer Bündnispartner der USA gilt, bedeutet der aktuelle Vorstoß eine neue Qualität.

»Mit dieser Armada wollen die USA natürlich nicht den Drogenhandel bekämpfen, sondern eine strategische Basis in Costa Rica aufbauen für Militäreinsätze gegen Länder, die sich aus ihrem Würgegriff befreien wollen«, erklärte Albino Vargas, Vorsitzender der Gewerkschaft des öffentlichen Dienstes ANEP. Faktisch werde Costa Rica mit dem Beschluß zur größten Basis der US-Marine und die nationale Souveränität außer Kraft gesetzt. Für den Gewerkschafter ist dies »Vaterlandsverrat«.

Unter dem Motto »Gringo go home« haben Frente Amplio und ein breites antimilitärisches Bündnis für diesen Samstag zu einer Demonstration in der Hauptstadt San José aufgerufen, während Gewerkschaften für den 26. Juli eine weitere Protestaktion vorbereiten.

quelle: http://www.jungewelt.de/2010/07-10/033.php

Die Regierung erlaubt die Präsenz von US-Truppen in costaricanischen Gewässern und im Luftraum. Angeblich sollen sie bei der Bekämpfung des Drogenschmuggels helfen. VON CECIBEL ROMERO

Kampfflugzeuge wie diese AV-8B Harrier dürfen demnächst über dem eigentlich entmilitarisierten Costa Rica kreisen. Foto: rts

SAN SALVADOR taz | Über 60 Jahre lang hat sich Costa Rica gerühmt, eines der friedlichsten Länder der Welt zu sein. 1948 wurde die Armee abgeschafft, das kleine Land in Zentralamerika war entmilitarisierte Zone. Das wird jetzt anders: Das Parlament hat mit den Stimmen der regierenden National-liberalen Partei (PLN) und der rechten „Libertären Erneuerungsbewegung Costa Ricas“ (RC) ein Dekret verabschiedet, das die massive Präsenz von US-Truppen in costaricanischen Gewässern und im Luftraum erlaubt. 46 Kriegsschiffe, 7.000 Marines, 200 Helikopter und 10 Kampfflugzeuge vom Typ AV-8B Harrier dürfen sich im Hoheitsgebiet des Landes tummeln. Ihr abgeblicher Auftrag: die Bekämpfung des Drogenhandels und ein bisschen humanitäre Hilfe. Die Erlaubnis gilt zunächst für sechs Monate.

Seit die Armee Costa Ricas am 1. Dezember 1948 abgeschafft und das auch in der Verfassung verankert wurde, gab es – abgesehen von illegalen Lagern der rechten nicaraguanischen Contra in den 80er-Jahren – keine Militärs im Land. Das Dekret, das nun der US-Armee Eintritt verschafft, wird deshalb von der Opposition als Einladung zur Besetzung verstanden: „Das ist ein Blankoscheck“, sagt Luis Fishman von der konservativen „Sozial-christlichen Einheit“ (PUSC). Die linke „Partei der Bürgeraktion“ (PAC) spricht von einer „Invasion in die nationale Souveränität“. Beide Parteien haben eine Verfassungsklage angekündigt.

Bereits seit 1999 gibt es ein Abkommen über gemeinsame Patrouillen der zur Polizei gehörenden Küstenwache Costa Ricas mit US-amerikanischen Drogenfahndern. Das Kommando haben die Costaricaner. Die Hoheitsgewässer des kleinen Landes werden von den Schnellbooten kolumbianischer Kokainkartelle auf ihrem Weg nach Mexiko und in die Vereinigten Staaten genutzt, der Luftraum wird von den kleinen Propellermaschinen der Drogenkuriere gekreuzt. Die Opposition hat nichts gegen diese gemeinsamen Patrouillen. Jetzt aber gehe es um eine massive Streitmacht, mit Flugzeugträgern und allem Drum und Dran.

Mit demselben Argument der Bekämpfung des Drogenhandels haben die USA im vergangenen Jahr mit Kolumbien ein Abkommen über die Nutzung von sieben Militärbasen des südamerikanischen Landes abgeschlossen. Das benachbarte linksregierte Venezuela verstand diesen Vertrag als direkte Bedrohung und zog seinen Botschafter aus Bogotá zurück. Es folgte eine andauernde politische Verstimmung zwischen den Nachbarländern. Die Militärpräsenz in Costa Rica dürfte weiter für Unruhe in den zentralamerikanischen Ländern sorgen, vor allem im direkten Nachbarland Nicaragua, das über das Wirtschaftsbündnis Alba politisch eng mit Venezuela verbandelt ist.

Die Alba-Mitglieder sehen in der US-Militärpräsenz zur angeblichen Bekämpfung des Drogenhandels einen Vorwand. Das eigentliche Ziel sei die Durchsetzung der politischen und wirtschaftlichen Interessen Washingtons in Lateinamerika. Präsident Barack Obama unterscheide sich da nicht von seinem Vorgänger George W. Bush. Erst in der vergangenen Woche hatte der von Militärs gestürzte frühere Präsident von Honduras Manuel Zelaya gesagt, der Putsch gegen ihn sei von US-Militärs ausgeheckt worden. Das Außenministerium in Washington wies diese Erklärung als „lächerlich“ zurück.

Quelle:http://www.taz.de/1/politik/amerika/artikel/1/blanko-scheck-zur-invasion/

Mit der Armee bekämpft Mexikos Regierung die Drogenmafia. Doch die Soldaten verbreiten Angst und Terror unter der Landbevölkerung. Ihre Vergehen bleiben ungesühnt.

Rund 45.000 Soldaten und Bundespolizisten hat Mexikos Präsident Calderón für den Drogenkrieg aktiviert.

Rund 45.000 Soldaten und Bundespolizisten hat Mexikos Präsident Calderón für den Drogenkrieg aktiviert.

Das Regierungsgebäude aus Kolonialzeiten in Ayutla ist heruntergekommen. Es dient gleichzeitig als Bürgermeistersitz, Postamt und Gefängnis. Im schäbigen Besuchszimmer empfängt der Häftling Raúl Hernández zum Interview. Nachdenklich blickt er durch das vergitterte Fenster auf den bunten Markt der südmexikanischen Stadt, wo Zitrusfrüchte, Mais und Bohnen zum Verkauf ausliegen. All das baute auch Hernández auf seinem Land an, bis ihn Soldaten vor fast zwei Jahren ins Gefängnis steckten. Seither teilt er mit 30 weiteren Häftlingen eine enge Zelle. „Ich bin unschuldig.“ Diesen Satz wiederholt der kleine, stämmige Mann vom Volk der Me’phaa immer wieder Hernández ist einer der Fälle, mit denen sich ab Freitag die Mexiko-Konferenz der Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung in Berlin befasst. Die grüne Denkfabrik weist besorgt auf die „Politik der harten Hand“ von Mexikos Präsident Felipe Calderón hin. Nach seinem Amtsantritt 2006 erklärte der konservative Christdemokrat den Drogenkartellen den Krieg und mobilisierte rund 45.000 Soldaten und Bundespolizisten. Seither schlagen die Kartelle mit Brutalität zurück. Mehr als 7700 Menschen verloren dabei vergangenes Jahr ihr Leben. Die blutigen Massaker machen weltweit Schlagzeilen.

Bundesstaat Guerrero

© ZEIT ONLINE

Weniger bekannt ist dagegen die Brutalität, mit der Mexikos Armee ihren sogenannten Drogenkrieg führt. Davon erzählt der Häftling Hernández. Er gehört zu den Ureinwohnern Guerreros, so wie die meisten Kleinbauern in den kargen Bergen des südmexikanischen Bundesstaates von der Größe Bayerns. Sie leben in extremer Armut, vergessen von der Regierung. Umworben werden sie höchstens von Drogenkurieren aus Kolumbien, die gerne an Guerreros Pazifikküste anlanden und nach Wegen zum Weitertransport ihrer heißen Ware suchen. Guerrero ist der ideale Ort, um willige Helfer zu rekrutieren. 42 Prozent seiner Einwohner sind nach offizieller Statistik unterernährt.

Hernández hat nichts mit Drogenhändlern zu tun. Er gehört zu denen, die sich die Armut nicht mehr gefallen lassen. Darum schloss er sich der „Organisation des Indigenen Me’phaa-Volkes“ (OPIM) an. Fragt man ihn, ob er ein Menschenrechtsaktivist ist, schaut er fragend. Er spricht zwar spanisch, doch die für ihn fremde Sprache will nicht recht fließen. Schließlich sagt er, er fordere lediglich das Nötigste für sein Dorf: Gesundheitsversorgung und Lehrer, Dünger und Baumaterialien.

Die lokale Regierung reagiert auf die Forderungen der Indios genauso, wie es bereits die Spanier bei der Eroberung Guerreros vor fast 500 Jahren taten. Sie schickt die Armee. Die Soldaten verwüsten die Felder der als aufmüpfig geltenden Bauerndörfer um Ayutla, vergewaltigen Frauen, durchsuchen widerrechtlich Häuser, drohen und prügeln. Das „Zentrum Tlachinollan“, eine in Guerrero aktive Menschenrechtsgruppe, hat 109 Fälle von schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen akribisch dokumentiert.

Source: die Zeit

Rechtsanwalt Rogelio Teliz, der sich um Hernández kümmert, bezeichnet den militärischen Antidrogenkampf in Mexiko als „Vorwand für mehr Repression“. Und die bleibt straffrei. Denn für Verbrechen von Soldaten ist in Mexiko die Militärjustiz zuständig. Sie spricht die Angeklagten in der Regel frei.

Die US-Organisation Human Rights Watch bemängelte in ihrem vor zwei Wochen präsentierten Jahresbericht eine deutliche Verschlechterung der Menschenrechtslage in Mexiko. Schuld daran sei die Militärjustiz, die Verbrechen der Soldaten durchgehen lasse.

Straffrei blieb in Ayutla bisher auch die schockierendste Tat im Dunstkreis der Armee, die sich nur wenige Blocks entfernt von Hernández‘ Zelle ereignete: der Mord am Indio-Führer Raúl Lucas. Mehrmals hatten ihn Soldaten illegal festgenommen und gefoltert. Lucas erstattete Anzeige, doch die Justiz blieb untätig. Vor einem Jahr dann entführten ihn Paramilitärs vor den Augen der Polizei, zusammen mit einem weiteren Indio-Aktivisten. Zehn Tage später fand man die Leichen der beiden Männer, sie waren offenbar grausam gefoltert worden. Die Justiz ermittelt seither widerwillig und quälend langsam. Währenddessen erhielt die Witwe von Lucas einen anonymen Anruf: „Das geschieht ihm, weil er Indios verteidigt“.

Aktiv wird Guerreros Justiz allerdings gegenüber denjenigen, die sich wehren. Das wurde Hernández zum Verhängnis. Soldaten nahmen ihn im April 2008 fest, nachdem ein Armee-Informant kurz zuvor ermordet worden war. Die angeblichen Beweise für Hernández‘ Beteiligung an der Tat hält Anwalt Teliz für „erfunden“. Der Indioführer hat ein hieb- und stichfestes Alibi. Amnesty international hat ihn als Gewissenshäftling anerkannt und fordert seine sofortige Freilassung.

Genauso wie das Gefängnis, in dem Hernández einsitzt, stammt auch das Strafprozessrecht Mexikos aus den Zeiten der Inquisition. Ist ein Verdächtiger erst einmal in Haft, so liegt es an ihm, seine Unschuld zu beweisen. „In Mexiko wird das Grundprinzip der Unschuldsvermutung verletzt“, resümiert Anwalt Teliz. Er sagt: „Seit Jahren zeigen wir Übergriffe und Drohungen gegen Menschenrechtler an, aber die Staatsanwaltschaft unternimmt nichts. Seit mehr als vier Jahren gab es keine einzige Festnahme von Verdächtigen. Im Fall von Hernández waren sie dagegen sehr schnell“.

Hernández hat wenigstens das Glück, internationale Unterstützung zu erhalten. Delegationen aus aller Welt besuchten ihn, darunter auch ein Vertreter der Deutschen Botschaft in Mexiko. Was das für ihn bedeutet, erklärt der Indio-Aktivist auf die ihm eigene, praktische Art: „Die Wärter behandeln mich jetzt korrekt.“ Dabei verweist er auf die mitgebrachten Früchte. Sie kann er entgegennehmen, ohne wie früher das Gefängnispersonal bestechen zu müssen. Streng begrenzt bleibt aber weiterhin die Liste des Erlaubten: vier Bananen und zwei Äpfel, mehr nicht. Höflich bedankt sich Hernández dafür. Er wirft einen letzten Blick auf den Markt vor dem Fenster, dann kehrt er in seine Zelle zurück.

source: die Zeit

Mit ungewöhnlichem Mut und bislang nicht zu beobachtenden Maßnahmen haben sich die Regierungsführer von Jamaika und Mexiko dazu entschieden, die meist gefürchteten und gesuchten Drogenbarone mit militärischen Mitteln, dem Einsatz von Waffen und den Regeln des Gesetzes zu attackieren. Einige der gewalttätigsten Drogenbarone ihrer Länder sollen zudem an die USA ausgeliefert werden, wo sie seit langer Zeit zur Fahndung ausgeschrieben sind. Hauptproblem des Kampfes gegen die Drogen ist jedoch immer gewesen, dass die Gangs die politischen Ebenen der süd- und mittelamerikanischen Länder infiltriert haben, was diesen Kampf von vornherein ad absurdum führte.

Im Verlauf der Zeit endet eine Koexistenz zwischen einflussreichen Gangs und der Politik normalerweise auf böse Weise für eine Nation, was jetzt auch seitens des jamaikanischen Premierministers Bruce Golding öffentlich zugegeben wurde. In der vergangenen Woche traf er die Entscheidung, sich dem gut etablierten Drogenbaron Christopher “Dudus” Coke zu widmen, der in den Vereinigten Staaten gesucht wird. Der Kampf um die Ergreifung von Coke hat nun dazu geführt, Teile der jamaikanischen Hauptstadt Kingston in ein Schlachtfeld zu verwandeln. Die anhaltenden Straßenkämpfe werden als notwendig im Hinblick auf die Säuberung der jamaikanischen Gesellschaft betrachtet. Wie der Premierminister ausführte, stünde das Land an einem wichtigen Wendepunkt, um die Mächte des Bösen zu bekämpfen, die die Gesellschaft durchdrungen und fest im Würgegriff hielten. Die Aktivitäten dieser Kräfte hätten in der Vergangenheit überdies das Resultat gezeitigt, Kingston das Label einer der kriminellsten und gefährlichsten Hauptstädte der Welt aufzukleben. Das Handeln der Regierung soll sicherlich das Signal aussenden, dass Jamaika ein Land des Friedens, der Gesetzesbefolgung und der Sicherheit ist. Mexikos Präsident Felipe Calderon hat jüngst ähnliche Ziele formuliert. Wie er in einer in der letzten Woche gehaltenen Rede vor dem US-Kongress sagte, werde dieser Kampf nicht nur bezüglich der Niederringung des Drogenhandels ausgetragen. In erster Linie sei die Aufnahme dieses Kampfes dem Versuch gewidmet, um die persönliche Sicherheit der mexikanischen Familien zukünftig besser zu garantieren, die der Gefahr des Missbrauchs und dem willkürlichen Drohpotenzial der Kriminellen ausgesetzt seien. Die Vereinigten Staaten unterstützen beide Regierungsführer in ihren Kampagnen, denn sie stellen einen nicht geringen Anteil an den einzelnen Kriegsschauplätzen im Rahmen des immer aufwendiger angelegten US-Kriegs gegen den Drogenhandel dar. Auch will Amerika durch sein Handeln die eigene Verantwortung im Hinblick auf seine riesigen jährlichen Importe illegaler Drogen unterstreichen. Die alte Phrase vom “Krieg gegen die Drogen” hat sich nun zu einer sehr reellen Schlacht in zwei Nachbarländern der USA entwickelt, vergleichbar mit der Situation, die vor einigen Jahren in Kolumbien vorherrschte. Dort konnte der Drogenanbau mit Hilfe des dortigen Präsidenten Uribe bis heute unter Kontrolle gebracht werden, auch wenn sich immer wieder Lücken auftun in denjenigen Gebieten und Regionen, die durch die linksgerichteten FARC-Guerillieros beherrscht werden. Der Auslöser für derartige Kriege wird weitläufig in dem Aspekt gesehen, dass die nationalen Führer die Drogenbarone schlussendlich als das ansehen müssen, was sie sind – nämlich eine Bedrohung und somit etwas, das es zu bekämpfen und nicht zu tolerieren gilt. Ich persönlich habe in diesem Punkt eine ein wenig differenziertere Sichtweise. Wenn man sich die Lieferkette von den Erzeugerländern Ecuador oder Kolumbien hinauf durch die mittelamerikanischen Staaten Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala bis nach Mexiko und die Vereinigten Staaten anschaut, so ist es ein offenes Geheimnis, dass nahezu der gesamte Staats- und Beamtensektor an dieser Lieferkette in den einzelnen Transitländern sehr viel Geld verdient. Für viele korrumpierte Personen aus den Staatsapparaten ist die Teilnahme am Drogenhandel nicht nur zu einer Neben-, sondern absoluten Haupteinnahmequelle avanciert. Wundern sollte einen das nicht, denn die Margen in diesem Geschäft sind wahrscheinlich die höchsten der Welt, weshalb staatliche Organe wie die Polizei oder auch die Gerichtsbarkeit in diesen Ländern durch Korruption leicht zu unterwandern und infiltrieren sind. Diesen aus der Flasche entlassenen Geist wird man wohl nie wieder in die Flasche zurückbekommen, denn es sei darauf hingewiesen, dass 1 Gramm hochwertiges und nicht verschnittenes Kokain den Touristen am Strand von Ecuador für lächerliche $2,50 zum Kauf angeboten wird. In den Vereinigten Staaten hat dasselbe Gramm dann einen Marktwert von leicht $150 bis $180. Wenn staatliche Organe und das Militär in Mexiko und Jamaika nun gegen verschiedene Drogenbarone vorgehen, so könnte dies auch daran liegen, dass zwischen den Baronen und den einzelnen politischen Ebenen ein Machtkampf um die Anteile am Kuchen aus diesem Geschäft ausgebrochen ist. Wer auch nur einmal in Süd- oder Mittelamerika oder auch der Karibik gewesen ist oder dort vielleicht auch eine Zeit lang gelebt hat, wird wissen, dass hinter vorgehaltener Hand jedermann darüber im Bilde ist, dass die Politik und ihre staatlichen Organe mit an diesem Handel verdienen. Denn es ist das gesamte System, das faul ist. Deshalb wäre ich vorsichtig mit der vorschnellen Bildung einer Meinung bezüglich dieses offen ausgebrochenen Krieges, für den sich viele Medien missbrauchen lassen, um der Weltöffentlichkeit die heroischen Ziele der Regierungsführer zu suggerieren, wie sie oben bereits beschrieben wurden, und die zur Erklärung dieses Krieges oftmals herhalten müssen. In Süd- und Mittelamerika muss ein Wolf sein, wer den lukrativsten Handel der Welt kontrollieren oder an ihm partizipieren will. Man sollte daher niemals vergessen, dass diese Wölfe nicht nur unter den Drogenbaronen, sondern genauso in Politik, Polizei, Militär oder der einfachen Bevölkerung zu finden sind, die insbesondere auf Basis der darnieder liegenden Wirtschaften in ihren Ländern im Drogenhandel eine alternative und zudem äußerst lukrative Einnahmequelle sehen, die sie keinesfalls verlieren wollen.

source: http://www.wirtschaftsfacts.de/?p=5341

Strict limits on how long drug addicts are allowed to stay on heroin substitute methadone have been proposed by the government body responsible for treatment strategy, in what will be seen as a watershed in UK drugs policy.

The National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse (NTA) is describing the move as a rebalancing of the system in favour of doing more to get addicts clean.

But cynics will regard the shift by the NTA, which has faced criticism and calls for it to be scrapped, as a late attempt to save itself before the coalition review of arm’s-length government bodies.

Martin Barnes, the chief executive of the DrugScope charity, which represents 700 local drugs agencies, said: „A goal of avoiding open-ended prescribing through improved practice is not the same as, and should not be confused with, the setting of time limits.“

An estimated 330,000 people in England and Wales are addicted to heroin, crack cocaine or both. More than 200,000 are in contact with treatment agencies, but most are „maintained“ on methadone or other synthetic opiates, at a cost of £300m a year, rather than pushed towards abstaining from all drugs, whether prescribed or illegal. Strict time limits on methadone treatment would require a big expansion of residential care for addicts.

In a report last week the influential Centre for Social Justice, set up by former Conservative party leader Iain Duncan Smith, called for the NTA to be scrapped and replaced by an „addiction recovery board“ covering drugs and alcohol misuse. The report repeated claims that only 4% of drug addicts are emerging clean from treatment.

The NTA, which is responsible for England, disputes this figure, saying that the number of people „successfully completing treatment free of dependency“ rose to 25,000 in 2008-09, about 12% of those who were in „effective“ treatment.

However, the agency has accepted that it needs to revise its approach in view of the change of government. In draft changes to its business plan, approved by the NTA board but not yet signed off by ministers, it states: „We intend to take forward the government’s ambition for a rapid transformation of the treatment system to promote sustained recovery and get more people off illegal drugs for good.“

The aim, the draft says, is to rebalance the system and „ensure successful completion and rehabilitation is an achievable aspiration for the majority in treatment“.

The idea of time limits is drawn from new Department of Health clinical guidance for opiate prescription in prisons. The guidance requires that offenders serving sentences of six months or more should have any prescription reviewed at least every three months. The prison guidance states: „If there is some exceptional reason why abstinence cannot be considered, then the reason must be clearly documented on the clinical record at each three-month review.“

In the draft revision of its business plan, the NTA says: „No one should be ‚parked‘ indefinitely on methadone or similar opiate substitutes without the opportunity to get off drugs. New clinical guidance has introduced strict time limits to end the practice of open-ended substitute prescribing in prisons. This principle will be extended into community settings.

„New clinical protocols will focus practitioners and clients on abstinence as the desired outcome of treatment, and time limits in prescribing will prevent unplanned drift into long-term maintenance.“

The NTA declined to comment on its proposals. But word of its policy shift is prompting excited debate in the £1.2bn drugs treatment sector. The methadone issue became totemic for critics of the Labour government’s social and criminal justice policies, and was raised repeatedly by David Cameron during the general election campaign.

Karen Biggs, the chief executive of Phoenix Futures, a leading treatment provider, welcomed the move towards a „better balance“ in the treatment system. „There are excellent examples across the country of recovery-orientated treatment systems that help people move from the most chronic addictions to a life of recovery,“ Biggs said. „A balanced treatment system which is ambitious for the individuals and communities with which it works will contribute to the wider social policy objectives of the coalition government.“

Kokang rebels produce drugs in Asia World Company dam sitesIn a new revelation Kokang rebels sheltered in China’s southwest Yunnan province are allegedly into illegal amphetamine production in the dam construction sites of Burma-Asia World Company in Kachin State, in northern Burma. This was revealed by sources close to the rebels.left align image

The amphetamines, also called Yama tablets are being produced in the dam construction sites jointly operated by ASW and the Chinese state-owned China Power Investment Corporation (CPI) in Kachin State, since last year, added the sources.

Currently, the Chipwi dam in N’Mai Hka River and Myitsone dam in Irrawaddy River, or Mali Hka River are being constructed by the two companies, where the illegal drugs are produced. The sites are provided security by Burmese security forces, the sources added.

There are several hundred labourers in the two dam sites and all workers are Chinese except those into road construction and the day labourers.

In early July, about 300 Kokang troops led by Peng Daxun, eldest son of absconding Kokang leader Peng Jia-sheng sneaked into areas controlled by former New Democratic Army-Kachin (NDA-K) in eastern Kachin state, bordering Yunnan province, from the Chinese border town Nansan, opposite Kokang territories in Northeast Shan State.

Peng Daxun’s troops were given shelter in the Chinese border city Nansan along with their arms by Chinese authorities in the wake of the fall of Laogai, the capital of the Kokang rebels, or the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army (MNDAA) to the Burmese Army in August, last year.

The rebel capital was seized by Burmese troops on the allegation that they were producing illegal drugs and weapons.

Peng Daxun’s troops have been secretly producing amphetamines in the dam construction sites before they entered Kachin State from Nansan, said sources.right align image

Recently, Peng Daxun’s men were said to have explored the illegal drug market on the Burma-Bangladesh border, said sources close to him.

The illegal drug production done in utmost secrecy has the cooperation of the AWC owned by Burmese drug lord Lo Hsing Han and Peng Daxun’s Kokang troops.

Lo Hsing Han and Kokang leader Peng Jia-sheng are close relatives and the sons of the two — U Tun Myint Naing, a.k.a Steven Law, son of Lo Hsing Han and Peng Daxun son of Peng Jia-sheng are also close and have businesses links, said sources close to them.

Peng Daxun has business investments in companies in Singapore through U Tun Myint Naing, who is married to a Singaporean.

source: http://www.bnionline.net/news/kng/89…dam-sites.html

A very good read:ChasingthdragonOriginsandHistory

Asthma and Heroin, a maybe lethal combination?

Read more: HeroinInsufflationandasthma

This is a little bit out of time but still interesting!

„SINGAPORE’S economic linkage with Burma is one of the most vital factors for the survival of Burma’s
military regime,“ says Professor Mya Maung, a Burmese economist based in Boston. This link, he continues,
is also central to „the expansion of the heroin trade.“ Singapore has acieved the distinction of being the
Burmese junta’s number one business partner – both largest trading partner and largest foreign investor. More
than half these investments, totaling upwards of $1.3 billion, are in partnership with Burma’s infamous heroin
kingpin Lo Hsing Han who now controls a substantial portion of the world’s opium trade. The close political,
economic and military relationship between the two countries facilitates the weaving of millions of narcodollars
into the legitimate world economy.

Singapore has become a major player in Asian commerce. According to Steven Green, US Ambassador to
Singapore, free market policies have „allowed this small country to develop one of the world’s most successful
trading and investment economies.“ Singapore also has a strong role in the powerful 132-member country
World Trade Organization. Indeed, the tiny China Sea island of three and a half million people is known far
and wide as the blue chip of the region – a financial trading base and a route for the vast sums of money that
flow in and out of Asia.

If the brutal Burmese dictatorship’s international pariah status is of any concern to its more powerful partner,
Singapore shows no sign of it. Following the March 24 visit of Singapore’s Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong to
Rangoon, a Singapore spokesperson proclaimed, „Singapore and Myanmar should continue to explore areas
where they can complement each other.“ As both countries continue to celebrate their „complementary“
relationship, the international community must take note of the powerful support this relationship provides
both to Burma’s illegitimate regime and to its booming billion dollar drug trade.

Drugs ‘R’ Us
THE Burmese military dictatorship – known by the acronym slorc for State Law and Order Restoration
Council until it changed its name to the State Peace and Development Council (spdc) last November –
depends on the resources of Burma’s drug barons for its financial survival. Since it seized power in 1988,
opium production has doubled, equaling all legal exports and making the country the world’s biggest heroin
supplier. Burma now supplies the US with 60 percent of its heroin imports and has recently become a major
regional producer of methamphetamines. With 50 percent of the economy unaccounted for, drug traffickers,
businessmen and government officials are able to integrate spectacular profits throughout Burma’s permanent
economy.

Both the Burmese generals and drug lords have been able to take advantage of Singapore’s liberal banking
laws and money laundering opportunities. In 1991, for eaxample, the slorc laundered $400 million through a
Singapore bank which it used as a down payment for Chinese arms. Despite the large sum, Burma’s foreign
exchange reserves registered no change either before or after the sale. With no laws to prevent money
laundering, Singapore is widely reported to be a financial haven for Burma’s elite, including its two most
notorious traffickers, Lo Hsing Han and Khun Sa (also known by his Chinese name Chang Qifu).
SLORC cut a deal with Khun Sa for his „surrender“ in early 1996, allowing him protection and business
opportunities in exchange for retirement from the drug trade.

Khun Sa now bills himself as „a commercial real estate agent who also has a foot in the Burmese construction
industry.“ Already in control of a bus route into the northern poppy growing region where the military is
actively involved in the drug business, he is now investing $250 million in a new highway between Rangoon
and Mandalay, an spdc cabinet member confirmed. „The Burmese government says one thing but does
another,“ according to Banphot Piamdi, director of Thailand’s Northern Region’s Narcotics Suppression
Center. „It claims to have subdued Khun Sa’s group…However the fact is that the group under the supervision
of…Khun Sa’s son has received permission from Rangoon to produce narcotics in the areas along the
Thai-Burmese border.“

Khun Sa’s son is not the only trafficker reaping benefits in the Shan State area which borders Thailand and
China and serves as Burma’s primary poppy growing area. Field intelligence and ethnic militia sources
consistently report a pattern of Burmese military involvement with drug production in these remote areas.
Government troops offer protection to the heroin and amphetamine refineries in the area in exchange for
payoffs and gifts, such as Toyota sedans, pistols and army uniforms. The only access to the refineries is
through permits issued by Burmese military intelligence – without this, the heavily guarded areas surrounding
the refineries are too dangerous to approach. The military is also involved in protecting the transport of
narcotics throughout the region, which the authorities have sealed off from the outside world.
„There are persistent and reliable reports that officials, particularly army personnel posted in outlying areas,
are involved in the drug business,“ confirms the March 1998 US government narcotics report. „Army
personnel wield considerable political clout locally, and their involvement in trafficking is a significant
problem.“ Intelligence sources, working for ethnic leaders combating both the drug trade and the military
dictatorship, report that the pattern of government involvement extends all the way to the top. The central
government in Rangoon demands funds on a regular basis from regional commanders who, in turn, expect
payoffs from the rank and file. The soldiers get the money any way they can – through smuggling, gambling or
selling jade – with drugs being the most accessible source of revenue in Shan State. The officers in the field
also „tax“ refineries, drug transporters, and opium farmers.

At great risk, the intellignce sources – who go undercover to infiltrate troops in the field — collect
painstakingly detailed data including names, dates and places, such as these delivered in March 1998 from
Shan State: „On 10th Jan. 98, spdc army no. 65 stationed at Mong Ton sent 40 troops to Nam Hkek village,
Pon Pa Khem village tract, collected 0.16 kilo of opium per household or [collected payment of] Baht 600.
Then the troops sold the collected opium to the drug business men at the rate of Baht 6000 for 1.6 kilos „
Another report states: „Troops from spdc Battalion nos. 277 & 65 stationed at Mong Ton are still protecting
heroin refineries situated at Hkai lon, Pay lon & Ho ya areas, Mong Ton township. Those who can pay
B.200,00 per month are allowed to run the heroin refineries.“ And: „On 3rd of Jan. 98, Burma Army no. 99
collected opium tax in Lashio township. They charged 0.32 kilo per household. They arrested and beat
seriously those who failed to give.“

These sources also report that Ko Tat, Private 90900 from spdc battalion no. 525 stationed in Lin Kay,
recently defected from the Burmese army and said that his company had been giving protection to the opium
fields around Ho Mong. While the lower ranked officers struggle to meet their quotas in the field, the highest
levels of the goverment in the capital city strike deals with Burma’s two top traffickers, one of whom is the
prosperous partner of Singapore.
Lo Hsing Han: At Home in Singapore
WITH massive financial ties to Singapore, Lo Hsing Han is now one of Burma’s top investors. He, along with
Khun Sa, the former „king of opium,“ is a major player in the Burmese economy.
In the early 1990s, Lo Hsing Han controlled the most heavily armed drug-trafficking organization in Southeast

Asia. He was arrested in 1973 and sentenced to death, but was freed under a general amnesty in 1980. Now,

like Khun Sa, he wears the public persona of a successful businessman in Rangoon – where no one does
business without close government cooperation. Although he still overseas rural drug operations with the
status of a godfather, according to US narcotics officials, the notorious Lo currently serves as an advisor on
ethnic affairs to Lt. Gen. Khin Nyunt, the military intelligence chief and the junta’s powerful „Secretary 1.“
Lo Hsing Han is the chair of Burma’s biggest conglomerate, Asia World, founded in 1992. His son, Steven
Law, is managing director and also runs three companies in Singapore which are „overseas branches“ of Asia
World. Although Singapore is proud of its mandatory death penalty for small-time narcotics smugglers and
heroin addicts, both father and son travel freely in and out of the friendly island nation. „The family money is
offshore,“ said a high level US narcotics official. „The old man is a convicted drug trafficker, so his kid is
handling the financial activities.“

In 1996, when Law married his Singaporean business partner in a lavish, well-publicized Rangoon wedding,
guests from Singapore were flown in on two chartered planes. According to a high-level US government
official familiar with the situation, Law’s wife Cecilia Ng operates an underground banking system, and „is a
contact for people in Burma to get their drug money into Singapore, because she has a connection to the
government.“ The official said that she spends half her time in Rangoon, half in Singapore; when in Rangoon,
she is headquartered at Asia Lite, a subsidiary of Asia World. The husband-wife team are also the sole
officers and shareholders of Asia World subsidiary, Kokang Singapore Pte Ltd. Founded in Singapore in 1993
with $4.6 million, the company „engages in general trading activities in goods/products of all
kinds/descriptions.“

Singapore’s ventures with Asia World include both government and private investments. Kuok Singapore
Ltd., a partner with Asia World in many ventures, was Burma’s largest single real estate investor as of late
1996, with over $650 million invested. Other Singaporean companies are mentioned in Asia World’s company
reports. Sinmardev, another major Singaporean project linked to Lo’s company, is a $207 million industrial
park and port on the outskirts of Rangoon, which broke ground in 1997. Singaporean entrepreneur Albert
Hong, head of Sinmardev, described the project as the largest foreign investment in Burma outside the energy
field. The Singaporean consortium leads the joint venture along with the Burmese junta, Lo’s Asia World, and
a slew of international shareholders.

Kuok Singapore Ltd., Lo Hsing Han’s Asia World, and the Burmese junta are also partners in the luxury
Traders Hotel. The hotel’s November 1996 opening ceremony was attended by the Singapore ambassador, the
president of Kuok Singapore, and briefly by Lo Hsing Han himself. The presiding Burmese minister publicly
thanked Steven Law and the government of Singapore „without whose support and encouragement there
would be very few Singaporean businessmen in our country.“
While government and business connections in Burma and Singapore have boosted Asia World’s prospects,
other factors have contributed to the company’s extraordinary growth. In the last six years, Asia World has
expanded from a modest trading company to become Burma’s largest and fastest-growing private sector
enterprise with interests in trading, manufacturing, property, industrial investment, development, construction,
transportation, import and distribution, and infrastructure. „How is it that a company that has a humble
beginning trading beans and pulses is suddenly involved in $200 million projects?“ a US government official
said, requesting anonymity. „Where did all that start-up capital come from?“

The US government ventured a guess in 1996: it denied Asia World’s CEO Steven Law a visa to the US „on
suspicion of drug trafficking.“ Asia World’s operations now include a deepwater port in Rangoon, the Leo
Express bus line into Northern Burma, and a $33 million toll highway from the heart of Burma’s poppygrowing
region to the China border. On December 20, the conglomerate opened a wharf with freight handling,
storage, and a customs yard for ships carrying up to 15,000 tons. „If you’re in the dope business, these are the
types of things that you’ve got to have to be able to move your product,“ said a high level US narcotics
official. „They have set up institutions to facilitate the movement of drugs. And in all probability, they are

using laundered drug proceeds, or funds generated from investments of drug trafficking proceeds, to build this
infrastructure,“ he added.

The activities of Lo’s company Asia World have triggered an international narcotics investigation lead by
Washington. US investigators allege that Asia World’s relationship to Singapore paves the way for the
narcotics trade to be woven into all legitimate investments between the two countries. „Singapore’s
investments in Burma are opening doors for the drug traffickers, giving them access to banks and financial
systems,“ said one government official familiar with the situation.
One Stop Shopping: Intelligence to Repression
THE Burmese junta’s control of its impoverished population through crude methods such as torture, forced
labor, and mass killings leaves it open to international condemnation. In contrast, Singapore takes a more
sophisticated approach to repression, both at home and abroad. While the island-nation’s citizens have
material benefits and the appearance of rule of law, they live in fear of an Orwellian government that closely
monitors every aspect of their lives. The ruling party often sues those who dare to oppose it on trumped up
defamation charges, forcing many into bankruptcy or exile.

The FBI is investigating complaints by US citizens of harassment by Singapore’s Internal Security Department
(ISD). One California academic, a widely respected specialist on Southeast Asian affairs who asked not to be
identified, says ISD agents broke into his home because he was working to bring leading Singaporean
opposition figure Tang Liang Hong to an American university. The operatives tore out his door handle to get
in, then searched his computer and desk. A week later, an Asian man, waiting in a tree, photographed and
videotaped the academic while he walked in the park. After temporarily blinding the academic with his bright
flash, the man jumped from the tree and made a getaway in his car. Tang – who is facing a $4.5 million
defamation lawsuit by Singaporean senior ministers – was not surprised by the burglary. „I’ve been followed
everywhere, whether I was in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Australia or in London,“ he said in a phone interview
from Australia.

Singapore has been more than willing to share its expertise in intelligence with its Burmese counterparts. The
Singapore-Myanmar Ministerial-Level Work Committee was set up in 1993 in Rangoon to „forge mutual
benefits in investment, trade and economic sectors.“ The committee includes intelligence chief Lt. Gen. Khin
Nyunt, other top Burmese ministers, and high-level Singaporean officials. At the December 23 meeting, Khin
Nyunt urged his ministers to give priority to projects arranged by the Singaporean Government. „Pilot projects
are being implemented to transfer know how to Myanmar,“ said Khin Nyunt in his address.
One such project is a state-of-the-art cyber-war center in Rangoon. Burma’s military leaders can now
intercept a range of incoming communications – including telephone calls, faxes, emails and computer data
transmissions – from 20 other countries.

The high-tech cyber-war center was built by Singapore Technologies, the city-state’s largest industrial and
technology conglomerate, comprising more than 100 companies. This government-owned company also
provides on-site training at Burma’s Defense Ministry complex, and reportedly passes on its „sophisticated
capability“ to hundreds of Burmese „secret police“ at an institution inside Singapore.
Burma has no external enemies, but the ruling junta goes to extremes to terrorize the population through its
elaborate intelligence network. Intelligence officials have already used their newly-acquired talents from the
cyber-war center to arrest pro-democracy activists, and it is well known that Burma’s feared military
intelligence often tortures its victims during lengthy interrogations.
Singaporean companies have also helped suppress dissent in Burma by supplying the military with arms to use
against its own people. The first shipment of guns and ammunition was delivered on October 6, 1988.

Throughout the month, hundreds of boxes of mortars, ammunition, and other supplies marked „Allied
Ordnance, Singapore“ were unloaded from vessels in Rangoon. Allied Ordnance is a subsidiary of Chartered
Industries of Singapore, the arms branch of Singapore Technologies – the same government-owned company
which built the cyber-war center. The shipments also included rockets made by Chartered Industries of
Singapore under license from a Swedish company and sold in violation of an agreement with Sweden
requiring authorization for re-exports.

These shipments from Singapore arrived only weeks after the 1988 military takeover in Rangoon, in which
the new leaders of the SLORC massacred hundreds of peaceful, pro-democracy demonstrators in the street.
These killings followed another wave of government massacres earlier that summer, when longtime dictator
Ne Win struggled to keep power in the face of nationwide strikes and demonstrations for democracy. He
eventually stepped down but, operating behind the scenes, installed the puppet SLORC. As the killings
continued, thousands of civilians fled the country fearing for their lives. When numerous countries responded
by suspending aid and Burma’s traditional suppliers cut shipments, the SLORC became desperate. Singapore
was the first country to come to its rescue.
Singapore companies have continued to supply Burma’s military, sometimes acting as middlemen for arms
from other countries. In 1989, Israel and Belgium delivered grenade launchers and anti-tank guns via
Singapore. In 1992, Singapore violated the European Commission arms embargo on the Burmese regime by
acting as a broker and arranging for a $1.5 million shipment of mortars from Portugal.
„It is highly unlikely that any of these shipments to Burma could have been made without the knowledge and
support of the Singapore Government,“ wrote William Ashton in Jane’s Intelligence Review. „By assisting
with weapons sales, defense technology transfers, military training and intelligence cooperation, Singapore
has been able to win a sympathetic hearing at the very heart of Burma’s official councils.“

Singapore’s Stakes
LAST November, Singapore deployed its diplomatic arsenal to defend Rangoon at the UN. Singaporean UN
representatives made an effort to water down the General Assembly resolution which castigated the Burmese
government for its harsh treatment of pro-democracy activists, widespread human rights violations, and
nullification of free and fair elections that had voted it out of power. In an „urgent“ letter to the Swedish
mission, which was drafting the resolution, Singapore representative Bilahari Kausikan cited „progress“ in
Burma and said that „the majority of your co-sponsors have little or no substantive interests in Myanmar.
…Our position is different. We have concrete and immediate stakes.“
Objecting to parts of the resolution and attempting to soften the language, Singapore’s representative
circulated the letter to key members of the UN’s Third Committee on Human Rights „The driving force was
definitely business connections,“ according to Dr. Thaung Htun, Representative for UN Affairs of Burma’s
government-in-exile. „Singapore is defending its investments at the diplomatic level, using its efforts at the
UN level to promote its business interests.“

The protection of Singapore’s „concrete and immediate stakes“ is essential to the ruling party’s success in
maintaining power and the basis of its support for Burma, said Case Western Reserve University economist
Christopher Lingle. „Singapore depends heavily upon its symbiotic relationship with crony capitalists and
upon accommodating a high enough rate of return to keep the citizenry in line. Therefore its very survival is
tied up with business and government investments.“
William Ashton, writing in Jane’s Intelligence Review, suggested an additional incentive for Singapore’s
alliance with Burma. As Rangoon’s major regional backer and strategic ally, China has provided much of the
weaponry, training, and financial assistance for the junta. China’s expanding commercial and strategic
interests in the Asia-Pacific region, coupled with its alliance with neighboring Burma, is a source of great

concern in Singapore. The desire to keep Burma from becoming Beijing’s stalking horse in the region may
provide another motivation for Singapore’s wooing of Rangoon.

Turning a Blind Eye
THE Singapore government has consistently disregarded the gross human rights violations perpetrated by its
allies in Burma. The UN Special Rapporteur, appointed to report to the United Nations on the situation in
Burma, has been barred entry into Burma since 1995. The new US State Department Country report on
Burma for 1997 states that its „longstanding severe repression of human rights continued during the year.
Citizens continued to live subject at any time and without appeal to the arbitrary and sometimes brutal
dictates of the military dictatorship.“ Amnesty International reports that there are well over 1,200 political
prisoners languishing in Burmese dungeons where torture is commonplace.

Singapore has issued no urgent letters about a recent report by Danish Doctors for Human Rights which noted
that „sixty-six percent of [the over 120,000] refugees from Burma now living in Thailand have been tortured“
and subjected to „forced labor, deportation, pillaging, destruction of villages, and various forms of torture and
rape.“ The doctors reported that refugees witnessed the junta’s military forces murder members of their
families.
Singaporean leaders also seem unconcerned about the fact that the Burmese government shut down almost all
of Burma’s colleges and universities following student protests in December of 1996 and imprisoned hundreds
of students. At a February ceremony of the Singapore Association in Myanmar, the Ambassador to Singapore
presented a large check to Gen. Khin Nyunt – who is also Chairman of the government Education Committee
– for the „Myanmar education development fund.“ While depriving young Burmese of higher education, the
junta’s „Secretary 1″ Khin Nyunt responded that „Uplifting the educational standards of our people is one of
the social objectives of our Government.“ He then went on at length to extol the „firm foundation of growing
economic and trade ties“ between Singapore and Burma.

The Burmese government has also kept computers and communication technology away from students and
others in opposition to the regime. All computers, software, email services and other telecommunication
devices – which hardly anyone can afford anyway – must be licensed, but licences are almost impossible to
obtain. Yet Singapore has made the best computer technology available to the ruling elite and their business
partners. Singapore Telecom, the largest company in Asia outside of Japan, was the first to provide Burmese
businesses and government offices with the ability to set up inter-and intra-corporate communications in more
than 90 countries.

Complimentary Relations
SINGAPORE’Ss concerns are dramatically different from those of countries sharing a border with Burma.
Thailand has to deal with the deadly narcotics trade and an overwhelming number of refugees arriving on a
daily basis. Banphot Piamdi, the Thai counter-narcotics official, believes Thailand made a big mistake when it
voted for Burma’s entry into the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean), given Burma’s lack of
cooperation in fighting drugs. Not surprisingly, the Singapore government lobbied hard for Burma’s 1997
acceptance into the powerful regional trade alliance.

Ironically, Burma’s inclusion in asean may force member nations, including Singapore, to address the havoc
that their newest ally is imposing on the region – especially since Burma provides approximately 90 percent of
the total production of Southeast Asian opium. China and India, Burma’s other neighbors, now face severe
aids epidemics related to increased heroin use in their bordering provinces. Most of the heroin exported from
Burma to the West passes through China’s Yunnan province, which now has more than half a million addicts.
And even Singapore – whose heroin supply comes mostly from Burma – had a 41 percent rise in HIV cases in
1997.

As we head into the „Asian century,“ Singapore has become Washington’s forward partner in the unfolding
era of East-West trade. Ambassador Green called the country „a major entry port and a natural gateway to
Asia for American firms.“ US companies exported $16 billion worth of goods to Singapore in 1996 and more
than 1,300 US firms now operate in the country. Singapore’s strategic and economic importance to the US
cannot be overstated. The two countries just reached an agreement allowing the US Navy to use a Singapore
base even though the deal violates asean’s 1997 nuclear-weapons-free zone agreement.

The US has condemned the Burmese junta’s record of human rights abuses and support for the drug trade, but
has turned a blind eye when it comes to Singapore’s dealings with the regime. Although President Clinton
imposed economic sanctions on Burma partly for it’s role in providing pure and cheap heroin to America’s
youth, he has not commented on Singapore’s willingness to play ball with the world’s biggest heroin
traffickers. Ambassador Green told Congress last year that the US „has an important role in working with the
Singapore government to deal with illegal drug and weapons proliferation issues,“ but most US officials have
remianed silent about Singapore’s investments with Lo Hsing Han and Burma’s narco-dictatorship. It’s
unlikely Clinton made any mention of this issue last fall while golfing with Singaporean Prime Minister Goh
Chok Tong during the apec summit in Vancouver.

Unless the financial crisis in Asia limits profits, Singapore will probably continue to expand its investments in
Burma. „Our two economies are complementary and although we can derive satisfaction from the progress
made, I believe that there still remains a great potential that is yet to be exploited,“ said the junta’s Gen. Khin
Nyunt last February. Aided by Singapore’s support, Burma’s thriving heroin trade has plagued the majority of
countries around the globe. While these countries blithely pour money into drug-connected companies based
in Burma and thereby help them to expand into foreign markets, an abundance of the world’s finest heroin
continues to plague their citizens. At the same time, the line between legitimate and illegitimate investments
grows dimmer in the global economy.„SINGAPORE’S economic linkage with Burma is one of the most vital factors for the survival of Burma’s
military regime,“ says Professor Mya Maung, a Burmese economist based in Boston. This link, he continues,
is also central to „the expansion of the heroin trade.“ Singapore has acieved the distinction of being the
Burmese junta’s number one business partner – both largest trading partner and largest foreign investor. More
than half these investments, totaling upwards of $1.3 billion, are in partnership with Burma’s infamous heroin
kingpin Lo Hsing Han who now controls a substantial portion of the world’s opium trade. The close political,
economic and military relationship between the two countries facilitates the weaving of millions of narcodollars
into the legitimate world economy.

Singapore has become a major player in Asian commerce. According to Steven Green, US Ambassador to
Singapore, free market policies have „allowed this small country to develop one of the world’s most successful
trading and investment economies.“ Singapore also has a strong role in the powerful 132-member country
World Trade Organization. Indeed, the tiny China Sea island of three and a half million people is known far
and wide as the blue chip of the region – a financial trading base and a route for the vast sums of money that
flow in and out of Asia.

If the brutal Burmese dictatorship’s international pariah status is of any concern to its more powerful partner,
Singapore shows no sign of it. Following the March 24 visit of Singapore’s Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong to
Rangoon, a Singapore spokesperson proclaimed, „Singapore and Myanmar should continue to explore areas
where they can complement each other.“ As both countries continue to celebrate their „complementary“
relationship, the international community must take note of the powerful support this relationship provides
both to Burma’s illegitimate regime and to its booming billion dollar drug trade.

Drugs ‘R’ Us
THE Burmese military dictatorship – known by the acronym slorc for State Law and Order Restoration
Council until it changed its name to the State Peace and Development Council (spdc) last November –
depends on the resources of Burma’s drug barons for its financial survival. Since it seized power in 1988,
opium production has doubled, equaling all legal exports and making the country the world’s biggest heroin
supplier. Burma now supplies the US with 60 percent of its heroin imports and has recently become a major
regional producer of methamphetamines. With 50 percent of the economy unaccounted for, drug traffickers,
businessmen and government officials are able to integrate spectacular profits throughout Burma’s permanent
economy.

Both the Burmese generals and drug lords have been able to take advantage of Singapore’s liberal banking
laws and money laundering opportunities. In 1991, for eaxample, the slorc laundered $400 million through a
Singapore bank which it used as a down payment for Chinese arms. Despite the large sum, Burma’s foreign
exchange reserves registered no change either before or after the sale. With no laws to prevent money
laundering, Singapore is widely reported to be a financial haven for Burma’s elite, including its two most
notorious traffickers, Lo Hsing Han and Khun Sa (also known by his Chinese name Chang Qifu).
SLORC cut a deal with Khun Sa for his „surrender“ in early 1996, allowing him protection and business
opportunities in exchange for retirement from the drug trade.

Khun Sa now bills himself as „a commercial real estate agent who also has a foot in the Burmese construction
industry.“ Already in control of a bus route into the northern poppy growing region where the military is
actively involved in the drug business, he is now investing $250 million in a new highway between Rangoon
and Mandalay, an spdc cabinet member confirmed. „The Burmese government says one thing but does
another,“ according to Banphot Piamdi, director of Thailand’s Northern Region’s Narcotics Suppression
Center. „It claims to have subdued Khun Sa’s group…However the fact is that the group under the supervision
of…Khun Sa’s son has received permission from Rangoon to produce narcotics in the areas along the
Thai-Burmese border.“

Khun Sa’s son is not the only trafficker reaping benefits in the Shan State area which borders Thailand and
China and serves as Burma’s primary poppy growing area. Field intelligence and ethnic militia sources
consistently report a pattern of Burmese military involvement with drug production in these remote areas.
Government troops offer protection to the heroin and amphetamine refineries in the area in exchange for
payoffs and gifts, such as Toyota sedans, pistols and army uniforms. The only access to the refineries is
through permits issued by Burmese military intelligence – without this, the heavily guarded areas surrounding
the refineries are too dangerous to approach. The military is also involved in protecting the transport of
narcotics throughout the region, which the authorities have sealed off from the outside world.
„There are persistent and reliable reports that officials, particularly army personnel posted in outlying areas,
are involved in the drug business,“ confirms the March 1998 US government narcotics report. „Army
personnel wield considerable political clout locally, and their involvement in trafficking is a significant
problem.“ Intelligence sources, working for ethnic leaders combating both the drug trade and the military
dictatorship, report that the pattern of government involvement extends all the way to the top. The central
government in Rangoon demands funds on a regular basis from regional commanders who, in turn, expect
payoffs from the rank and file. The soldiers get the money any way they can – through smuggling, gambling or
selling jade – with drugs being the most accessible source of revenue in Shan State. The officers in the field
also „tax“ refineries, drug transporters, and opium farmers.

At great risk, the intellignce sources – who go undercover to infiltrate troops in the field — collect
painstakingly detailed data including names, dates and places, such as these delivered in March 1998 from
Shan State: „On 10th Jan. 98, spdc army no. 65 stationed at Mong Ton sent 40 troops to Nam Hkek village,
Pon Pa Khem village tract, collected 0.16 kilo of opium per household or [collected payment of] Baht 600.
Then the troops sold the collected opium to the drug business men at the rate of Baht 6000 for 1.6 kilos „
Another report states: „Troops from spdc Battalion nos. 277 & 65 stationed at Mong Ton are still protecting
heroin refineries situated at Hkai lon, Pay lon & Ho ya areas, Mong Ton township. Those who can pay
B.200,00 per month are allowed to run the heroin refineries.“ And: „On 3rd of Jan. 98, Burma Army no. 99
collected opium tax in Lashio township. They charged 0.32 kilo per household. They arrested and beat
seriously those who failed to give.“

These sources also report that Ko Tat, Private 90900 from spdc battalion no. 525 stationed in Lin Kay,
recently defected from the Burmese army and said that his company had been giving protection to the opium
fields around Ho Mong. While the lower ranked officers struggle to meet their quotas in the field, the highest
levels of the goverment in the capital city strike deals with Burma’s two top traffickers, one of whom is the
prosperous partner of Singapore.
Lo Hsing Han: At Home in Singapore
WITH massive financial ties to Singapore, Lo Hsing Han is now one of Burma’s top investors. He, along with
Khun Sa, the former „king of opium,“ is a major player in the Burmese economy.
In the early 1990s, Lo Hsing Han controlled the most heavily armed drug-trafficking organization in Southeast

Asia. He was arrested in 1973 and sentenced to death, but was freed under a general amnesty in 1980. Now,

like Khun Sa, he wears the public persona of a successful businessman in Rangoon – where no one does
business without close government cooperation. Although he still overseas rural drug operations with the
status of a godfather, according to US narcotics officials, the notorious Lo currently serves as an advisor on
ethnic affairs to Lt. Gen. Khin Nyunt, the military intelligence chief and the junta’s powerful „Secretary 1.“
Lo Hsing Han is the chair of Burma’s biggest conglomerate, Asia World, founded in 1992. His son, Steven
Law, is managing director and also runs three companies in Singapore which are „overseas branches“ of Asia
World. Although Singapore is proud of its mandatory death penalty for small-time narcotics smugglers and
heroin addicts, both father and son travel freely in and out of the friendly island nation. „The family money is
offshore,“ said a high level US narcotics official. „The old man is a convicted drug trafficker, so his kid is
handling the financial activities.“

In 1996, when Law married his Singaporean business partner in a lavish, well-publicized Rangoon wedding,
guests from Singapore were flown in on two chartered planes. According to a high-level US government
official familiar with the situation, Law’s wife Cecilia Ng operates an underground banking system, and „is a
contact for people in Burma to get their drug money into Singapore, because she has a connection to the
government.“ The official said that she spends half her time in Rangoon, half in Singapore; when in Rangoon,
she is headquartered at Asia Lite, a subsidiary of Asia World. The husband-wife team are also the sole
officers and shareholders of Asia World subsidiary, Kokang Singapore Pte Ltd. Founded in Singapore in 1993
with $4.6 million, the company „engages in general trading activities in goods/products of all
kinds/descriptions.“

Singapore’s ventures with Asia World include both government and private investments. Kuok Singapore
Ltd., a partner with Asia World in many ventures, was Burma’s largest single real estate investor as of late
1996, with over $650 million invested. Other Singaporean companies are mentioned in Asia World’s company
reports. Sinmardev, another major Singaporean project linked to Lo’s company, is a $207 million industrial
park and port on the outskirts of Rangoon, which broke ground in 1997. Singaporean entrepreneur Albert
Hong, head of Sinmardev, described the project as the largest foreign investment in Burma outside the energy
field. The Singaporean consortium leads the joint venture along with the Burmese junta, Lo’s Asia World, and
a slew of international shareholders.

Kuok Singapore Ltd., Lo Hsing Han’s Asia World, and the Burmese junta are also partners in the luxury
Traders Hotel. The hotel’s November 1996 opening ceremony was attended by the Singapore ambassador, the
president of Kuok Singapore, and briefly by Lo Hsing Han himself. The presiding Burmese minister publicly
thanked Steven Law and the government of Singapore „without whose support and encouragement there
would be very few Singaporean businessmen in our country.“
While government and business connections in Burma and Singapore have boosted Asia World’s prospects,
other factors have contributed to the company’s extraordinary growth. In the last six years, Asia World has
expanded from a modest trading company to become Burma’s largest and fastest-growing private sector
enterprise with interests in trading, manufacturing, property, industrial investment, development, construction,
transportation, import and distribution, and infrastructure. „How is it that a company that has a humble
beginning trading beans and pulses is suddenly involved in $200 million projects?“ a US government official
said, requesting anonymity. „Where did all that start-up capital come from?“

The US government ventured a guess in 1996: it denied Asia World’s CEO Steven Law a visa to the US „on
suspicion of drug trafficking.“ Asia World’s operations now include a deepwater port in Rangoon, the Leo
Express bus line into Northern Burma, and a $33 million toll highway from the heart of Burma’s poppygrowing
region to the China border. On December 20, the conglomerate opened a wharf with freight handling,
storage, and a customs yard for ships carrying up to 15,000 tons. „If you’re in the dope business, these are the
types of things that you’ve got to have to be able to move your product,“ said a high level US narcotics
official. „They have set up institutions to facilitate the movement of drugs. And in all probability, they are

using laundered drug proceeds, or funds generated from investments of drug trafficking proceeds, to build this
infrastructure,“ he added.

The activities of Lo’s company Asia World have triggered an international narcotics investigation lead by
Washington. US investigators allege that Asia World’s relationship to Singapore paves the way for the
narcotics trade to be woven into all legitimate investments between the two countries. „Singapore’s
investments in Burma are opening doors for the drug traffickers, giving them access to banks and financial
systems,“ said one government official familiar with the situation.
One Stop Shopping: Intelligence to Repression
THE Burmese junta’s control of its impoverished population through crude methods such as torture, forced
labor, and mass killings leaves it open to international condemnation. In contrast, Singapore takes a more
sophisticated approach to repression, both at home and abroad. While the island-nation’s citizens have
material benefits and the appearance of rule of law, they live in fear of an Orwellian government that closely
monitors every aspect of their lives. The ruling party often sues those who dare to oppose it on trumped up
defamation charges, forcing many into bankruptcy or exile.

The FBI is investigating complaints by US citizens of harassment by Singapore’s Internal Security Department
(ISD). One California academic, a widely respected specialist on Southeast Asian affairs who asked not to be
identified, says ISD agents broke into his home because he was working to bring leading Singaporean
opposition figure Tang Liang Hong to an American university. The operatives tore out his door handle to get
in, then searched his computer and desk. A week later, an Asian man, waiting in a tree, photographed and
videotaped the academic while he walked in the park. After temporarily blinding the academic with his bright
flash, the man jumped from the tree and made a getaway in his car. Tang – who is facing a $4.5 million
defamation lawsuit by Singaporean senior ministers – was not surprised by the burglary. „I’ve been followed
everywhere, whether I was in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Australia or in London,“ he said in a phone interview
from Australia.

Singapore has been more than willing to share its expertise in intelligence with its Burmese counterparts. The
Singapore-Myanmar Ministerial-Level Work Committee was set up in 1993 in Rangoon to „forge mutual
benefits in investment, trade and economic sectors.“ The committee includes intelligence chief Lt. Gen. Khin
Nyunt, other top Burmese ministers, and high-level Singaporean officials. At the December 23 meeting, Khin
Nyunt urged his ministers to give priority to projects arranged by the Singaporean Government. „Pilot projects
are being implemented to transfer know how to Myanmar,“ said Khin Nyunt in his address.
One such project is a state-of-the-art cyber-war center in Rangoon. Burma’s military leaders can now
intercept a range of incoming communications – including telephone calls, faxes, emails and computer data
transmissions – from 20 other countries.

The high-tech cyber-war center was built by Singapore Technologies, the city-state’s largest industrial and
technology conglomerate, comprising more than 100 companies. This government-owned company also
provides on-site training at Burma’s Defense Ministry complex, and reportedly passes on its „sophisticated
capability“ to hundreds of Burmese „secret police“ at an institution inside Singapore.
Burma has no external enemies, but the ruling junta goes to extremes to terrorize the population through its
elaborate intelligence network. Intelligence officials have already used their newly-acquired talents from the
cyber-war center to arrest pro-democracy activists, and it is well known that Burma’s feared military
intelligence often tortures its victims during lengthy interrogations.
Singaporean companies have also helped suppress dissent in Burma by supplying the military with arms to use
against its own people. The first shipment of guns and ammunition was delivered on October 6, 1988.

Throughout the month, hundreds of boxes of mortars, ammunition, and other supplies marked „Allied
Ordnance, Singapore“ were unloaded from vessels in Rangoon. Allied Ordnance is a subsidiary of Chartered
Industries of Singapore, the arms branch of Singapore Technologies – the same government-owned company
which built the cyber-war center. The shipments also included rockets made by Chartered Industries of
Singapore under license from a Swedish company and sold in violation of an agreement with Sweden
requiring authorization for re-exports.

These shipments from Singapore arrived only weeks after the 1988 military takeover in Rangoon, in which
the new leaders of the SLORC massacred hundreds of peaceful, pro-democracy demonstrators in the street.
These killings followed another wave of government massacres earlier that summer, when longtime dictator
Ne Win struggled to keep power in the face of nationwide strikes and demonstrations for democracy. He
eventually stepped down but, operating behind the scenes, installed the puppet SLORC. As the killings
continued, thousands of civilians fled the country fearing for their lives. When numerous countries responded
by suspending aid and Burma’s traditional suppliers cut shipments, the SLORC became desperate. Singapore
was the first country to come to its rescue.
Singapore companies have continued to supply Burma’s military, sometimes acting as middlemen for arms
from other countries. In 1989, Israel and Belgium delivered grenade launchers and anti-tank guns via
Singapore. In 1992, Singapore violated the European Commission arms embargo on the Burmese regime by
acting as a broker and arranging for a $1.5 million shipment of mortars from Portugal.
„It is highly unlikely that any of these shipments to Burma could have been made without the knowledge and
support of the Singapore Government,“ wrote William Ashton in Jane’s Intelligence Review. „By assisting
with weapons sales, defense technology transfers, military training and intelligence cooperation, Singapore
has been able to win a sympathetic hearing at the very heart of Burma’s official councils.“

Singapore’s Stakes
LAST November, Singapore deployed its diplomatic arsenal to defend Rangoon at the UN. Singaporean UN
representatives made an effort to water down the General Assembly resolution which castigated the Burmese
government for its harsh treatment of pro-democracy activists, widespread human rights violations, and
nullification of free and fair elections that had voted it out of power. In an „urgent“ letter to the Swedish
mission, which was drafting the resolution, Singapore representative Bilahari Kausikan cited „progress“ in
Burma and said that „the majority of your co-sponsors have little or no substantive interests in Myanmar.
…Our position is different. We have concrete and immediate stakes.“
Objecting to parts of the resolution and attempting to soften the language, Singapore’s representative
circulated the letter to key members of the UN’s Third Committee on Human Rights „The driving force was
definitely business connections,“ according to Dr. Thaung Htun, Representative for UN Affairs of Burma’s
government-in-exile. „Singapore is defending its investments at the diplomatic level, using its efforts at the
UN level to promote its business interests.“

The protection of Singapore’s „concrete and immediate stakes“ is essential to the ruling party’s success in
maintaining power and the basis of its support for Burma, said Case Western Reserve University economist
Christopher Lingle. „Singapore depends heavily upon its symbiotic relationship with crony capitalists and
upon accommodating a high enough rate of return to keep the citizenry in line. Therefore its very survival is
tied up with business and government investments.“
William Ashton, writing in Jane’s Intelligence Review, suggested an additional incentive for Singapore’s
alliance with Burma. As Rangoon’s major regional backer and strategic ally, China has provided much of the
weaponry, training, and financial assistance for the junta. China’s expanding commercial and strategic
interests in the Asia-Pacific region, coupled with its alliance with neighboring Burma, is a source of great

concern in Singapore. The desire to keep Burma from becoming Beijing’s stalking horse in the region may
provide another motivation for Singapore’s wooing of Rangoon.

Turning a Blind Eye
THE Singapore government has consistently disregarded the gross human rights violations perpetrated by its
allies in Burma. The UN Special Rapporteur, appointed to report to the United Nations on the situation in
Burma, has been barred entry into Burma since 1995. The new US State Department Country report on
Burma for 1997 states that its „longstanding severe repression of human rights continued during the year.
Citizens continued to live subject at any time and without appeal to the arbitrary and sometimes brutal
dictates of the military dictatorship.“ Amnesty International reports that there are well over 1,200 political
prisoners languishing in Burmese dungeons where torture is commonplace.

Singapore has issued no urgent letters about a recent report by Danish Doctors for Human Rights which noted
that „sixty-six percent of [the over 120,000] refugees from Burma now living in Thailand have been tortured“
and subjected to „forced labor, deportation, pillaging, destruction of villages, and various forms of torture and
rape.“ The doctors reported that refugees witnessed the junta’s military forces murder members of their
families.
Singaporean leaders also seem unconcerned about the fact that the Burmese government shut down almost all
of Burma’s colleges and universities following student protests in December of 1996 and imprisoned hundreds
of students. At a February ceremony of the Singapore Association in Myanmar, the Ambassador to Singapore
presented a large check to Gen. Khin Nyunt – who is also Chairman of the government Education Committee
– for the „Myanmar education development fund.“ While depriving young Burmese of higher education, the
junta’s „Secretary 1″ Khin Nyunt responded that „Uplifting the educational standards of our people is one of
the social objectives of our Government.“ He then went on at length to extol the „firm foundation of growing
economic and trade ties“ between Singapore and Burma.

The Burmese government has also kept computers and communication technology away from students and
others in opposition to the regime. All computers, software, email services and other telecommunication
devices – which hardly anyone can afford anyway – must be licensed, but licences are almost impossible to
obtain. Yet Singapore has made the best computer technology available to the ruling elite and their business
partners. Singapore Telecom, the largest company in Asia outside of Japan, was the first to provide Burmese
businesses and government offices with the ability to set up inter-and intra-corporate communications in more
than 90 countries.

Complimentary Relations
SINGAPORE’Ss concerns are dramatically different from those of countries sharing a border with Burma.
Thailand has to deal with the deadly narcotics trade and an overwhelming number of refugees arriving on a
daily basis. Banphot Piamdi, the Thai counter-narcotics official, believes Thailand made a big mistake when it
voted for Burma’s entry into the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean), given Burma’s lack of
cooperation in fighting drugs. Not surprisingly, the Singapore government lobbied hard for Burma’s 1997
acceptance into the powerful regional trade alliance.

Ironically, Burma’s inclusion in asean may force member nations, including Singapore, to address the havoc
that their newest ally is imposing on the region – especially since Burma provides approximately 90 percent of
the total production of Southeast Asian opium. China and India, Burma’s other neighbors, now face severe
aids epidemics related to increased heroin use in their bordering provinces. Most of the heroin exported from
Burma to the West passes through China’s Yunnan province, which now has more than half a million addicts.
And even Singapore – whose heroin supply comes mostly from Burma – had a 41 percent rise in HIV cases in
1997.

As we head into the „Asian century,“ Singapore has become Washington’s forward partner in the unfolding
era of East-West trade. Ambassador Green called the country „a major entry port and a natural gateway to
Asia for American firms.“ US companies exported $16 billion worth of goods to Singapore in 1996 and more
than 1,300 US firms now operate in the country. Singapore’s strategic and economic importance to the US
cannot be overstated. The two countries just reached an agreement allowing the US Navy to use a Singapore
base even though the deal violates asean’s 1997 nuclear-weapons-free zone agreement.

The US has condemned the Burmese junta’s record of human rights abuses and support for the drug trade, but
has turned a blind eye when it comes to Singapore’s dealings with the regime. Although President Clinton
imposed economic sanctions on Burma partly for it’s role in providing pure and cheap heroin to America’s
youth, he has not commented on Singapore’s willingness to play ball with the world’s biggest heroin
traffickers. Ambassador Green told Congress last year that the US „has an important role in working with the
Singapore government to deal with illegal drug and weapons proliferation issues,“ but most US officials have
remianed silent about Singapore’s investments with Lo Hsing Han and Burma’s narco-dictatorship. It’s
unlikely Clinton made any mention of this issue last fall while golfing with Singaporean Prime Minister Goh
Chok Tong during the apec summit in Vancouver.

Unless the financial crisis in Asia limits profits, Singapore will probably continue to expand its investments in
Burma. „Our two economies are complementary and although we can derive satisfaction from the progress
made, I believe that there still remains a great potential that is yet to be exploited,“ said the junta’s Gen. Khin
Nyunt last February. Aided by Singapore’s support, Burma’s thriving heroin trade has plagued the majority of
countries around the globe. While these countries blithely pour money into drug-connected companies based
in Burma and thereby help them to expand into foreign markets, an abundance of the world’s finest heroin
continues to plague their citizens. At the same time, the line between legitimate and illegitimate investments
grows dimmer in the global economy.

1. Introduction
2. The problem with prohibition
• A history of failure
• When prohibition collides with rising demand
• Five harms created by prohibition
• The limits of harm reduction and treatment
3. The solution is legally regulated markets
• Understanding legalisation as regulation and control
• What legalisation and regulation can achieve
• What legalisation and regulation cannot achieve
• Definitions
4. Options for the control and regulation of drugs
• Drug production
• Pharmaceutical drug production
• Non-pharmaceutical drugs production
• Drug supply
• Prescription
• Pharmacy sales
• Licensed premises
• Licensed sales
• Unlicensed sales
• Some new options
5. Creating an effective drug policy
• A new policy paradigm?
• Aims of ‘drug policy reform’ and aims of an ‘effective drug policy’
• Principles of effective drug policy making
• Policy evaluation and review
6. Responding to concerns about legalisation and regulation
• Rising prevalence
• Vulnerable groups
• Commercialisation
• Morals and messages
• Lack of an evidence base
Contents

4 http://www.tdpf.org.uk
7. Obstacles to reform
• The church of prohibition
• Political investment in prohibition
• The lack of critique
8. Roadmap for reform
• Incrementalism vs law reform
• Why now is the time for reform
• Drug law reform around the world
•• Time line for reform – Transform’s 2020 vision
9. What you can do
• Get informed
• Raise the debate
• Support Transform
• Further resources
Go on here:Transform_After_the_War_on_Drugs

1. Einleitung
Einheimische Deutsche bringen mit Aussiedlern nicht selten exzessiven Alkohol- und illega-len Drogenkonsum sowie Kriminalität in Verbindung. Damit meinen sie oft die jungen Russ-landdeutschen, die immer wieder im Blickpunkt der Medien stehen. Gerade die Medien sind es, die das Bild der Aussiedler in der Öffentlichkeit bestimmen, zumal die große Mehrheit der Bundesbürger über keine persönlichen Kontakte und Erfahrungen verfügt. Da Medien nur Ausschnitte der Realität zeigen und diese entsprechend den Interessen ihres Publikums aufbe-reiten, bleibt die mediale Darstellung des Drogenkonsums junger Aussiedler rudimentär.
Deshalb sind empirische Untersuchungen erforderlich, die Erkenntnisse über die Drogenprob-lematik bei Aussiedlern liefern. Seit einigen Jahren mehren sich Studien zu dieser Bevölke-rungsgruppe, dennoch fehlt es in Bezug auf den Drogenkonsum weiterhin an Daten. Dieser Missstand ist auch darauf zurückzuführen, dass diese Zuwanderer nach der Einreise die deut-sche Staatsangehörigkeit erhalten und deshalb in den meisten Statistiken nicht gesondert er-fasst werden. Ziel des vorliegenden Beitrags ist, die Einflüsse des Substanzgebrauchs im sozi-alen Umfeld der jungen Russlanddeutschen darzustellen. Solche Einflüsse wurden bei Aus-siedlern bislang lediglich ansatzweise (Strobl et al. 1999) untersucht.
Der vorliegenden Beitrag beschränkt sich auf die jungen Russlanddeutschen, da diese seit den 1990er Jahren das Gros der Aussiedler stellen.1 Ferner sind es diese Heranwachsenden, die immer wieder mit Drogen in Verbindung gebracht werden. Die Befragung war auf die Stadt Frankfurt am Main begrenzt.2 Dies hatte forschungsökonomische Gründe, hing aber auch mit der besonderen Situation in dieser Stadt zusammen: Frankfurt zählt neben Hamburg und Ber-lin zu den „Drogenhauptstädten“ der Bundesrepublik (vgl. Stöver 2001: 15)3 und zeichnet sich durch eine vorbildliche Integration von Zuwanderern aus.

Weiter geht es hier: zdun_drogen_russlanddeutsche

Experts are concerned with a finding that suggests chronic pain patients with a history of depression are much more likely to receive prescriptions of opioid medications.

Opioid medication include drugs such as Vicodin, OxyContin, Percodan, and Percocet.

Researchers discovered chronic pain patients with a history of depression are three times more likely to receive a prescription for this class of drug as compared to pain patients who do not suffer from depression.

The study, published in the November-December issue of the journal General Hospital Psychiatry, analyzed the medical records of tens of thousands of patients enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente and Group Health plans between 1997 and 2005.

Together, the insurers cover about 1 percent of the U.S. population. Long-term opioid use was defined as a patient receiving a prescription for 90 days or longer.

“It’s very widespread,” said Mark Sullivan, M.D., a study co-author and professor of psychiatry at the University of Washington.

“It’s a cause for concern because depressed patients are excluded from virtually all controlled trials of opioids as a high risk group [for addiction], so the database on which clinical practice rests doesn’t include depressed patients.”

Sullivan said most clinical trials exclude people with more than one disorder, but noted the problem is more worrisome here because depression affects so many — about 10 percent to 20 percent of the population.

The connection between pain and depression is complicated. First, no one really knows how often chronic pain and depression co-occur: 46 percent of patients seeing primary care doctors for ongoing pain have a history of depression and the vast majority of those seeing pain specialists have suffered both disorders, according to the authors.

“If you study depressed people, they tend to have lot of pain complaints that are poorly responsive to a lot of things so it’s not surprising that they end up on opioids,” Sullivan said.

Being depressed might make pain hurt more. “Emotional and physical pain aren’t all that different,” Sullivan added. “The same brain zones light up [in imaging studies].”

“Depression is mediated in some significant part by the brain’s opioid receptor systems; these things run together at every level that you look at them,” said Alex DeLuca, M.D., a consultant on pain and addiction and former chief of the Smithers Addiction Research and Treatment Center. He has no affiliation with the new study.

Consequently, it is impossible to tell whether pain is causing or exacerbating depression — or vice versa. To Sullivan, the bottom line is that “it is very important that opioid treatment for chronic pain does not replace or distract from treating mental disorders. ‘Both’ works better than ‘either/or.’”

source:http://psychcentral.com/news/2009/11/19/opioid-use-among-those-with-depression/9650.html

Das Schmerzmittel ist sehr wirksam, macht aber auch abhängig. Eine neue Studie könnte nun Drogentests in Frage stellen: Unter Stress produzieren Mäuse und wahrscheinlich auch Menschen Morphin im Körper.

Mäuse und wahrscheinlich auch der Mensch können das Schmerzmittel Morphin selbst produzieren. Ein deutsch- amerikanischen Forscherteam hat zumindest bei Mäusen eine körpereigene Morphin-Produktion nachgewiesen. Noch ist unklar, welchen Zweck die Morphinproduktion hat.

Morphinspuren in menschlichen Urinproben galten bislang als Hinweis auf Drogenkonsum oder den Verzehr mohnhaltiger Lebensmittel. Die Studie des Wissenschaftlerteams liefere nun einen Hinweis auf eine weitere mögliche Ursache, teilte die Technische Universität Dortmund mit.
An der Studie beteiligt waren das Institut für Umweltforschung der TU Dortmund und das Pflanzen- Forschungsinstitut Donald Danforth in St. Louis im US-Staat Missouri.
Die Forscher spritzten den Mäusen markiertes Tetrahydropapaverolin (THP). Diese Chemikalie wird in Mohnpflanzen in einem komplexen Prozess zum Morphin umgewandelt. „Die Tiere müssen also über ein ausgefeiltes Enzym-System verfügen, das sie in die Lage versetzt, eigenständig Morphin herzustellen“, sagte der Dortmunder Prof. Michael Spiteller.
Vorstellbar sei, dass die Tiere und möglicherweise auch der Mensch Morphin etwa bei einem Schock oder einer schweren Verletzung als körpereigenes Schmerzmittel bildeten. Weitere Untersuchungen sind geplant. Die Studie ist in den „Proceedings“ der US-Akademie der Wissenschaften (PNAS) veröffentlicht.

Violence is among the primary concerns of
communities around the world, and research
from many settings has demonstrated clear
links between violence and the illicit drug trade,
particularly in urban settings. While violence has
traditionally been framed as resulting from the
effects of drugs on individual users (e.g., druginduced
psychosis), violence in drug markets
and in drug-producing areas such as Mexico is
increasingly understood as a means for drug gangs
to gain or maintain a share of the lucrative illicit
drug market.
Given the growing emphasis on evidencebased
policy-making and the ongoing severe
violence attributable to drug gangs in many
countries around the world, a systematic review
of the available English language scientific literature
was conducted to examine the impacts of
drug law enforcement interventions on drug
market violence. The hypothesis was that the
existing scientific evidence would demonstrate an
association between increasing drug law enforcement
expenditures or intensity and reduced levels
of violence.
This comprehensive review of the existing
scientific literature involved conventional systematic
searching, data extraction, and synthesis
methods, and adhered to the Preferred Reporting
Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses
(PRISMA) guidelines. Specifically, a complete
search of the English language literature was
undertaken using electronic databases (Academic
Search Complete, PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE,
Web of Science, Sociological Abstracts,
Social Service Abstracts, PAIS International
and Lexis-Nexis), the Internet (Google, Google
Scholar) and article reference lists from date of
inception to October 2009.
The initial search captured 306 studies for
further analysis. Of these, 15 were identified which
evaluated the impact of drug law enforcement
on violence: 11 (73%) presented findings from
longitudinal studies using regression analysis,
2 (13%) presented theoretical models of drug
market responses to drug law enforcement, and 2
(13%) presented qualitative data. Contrary to our
primary hypothesis, 13 (87%) studies reported
a likely adverse impact of drug law enforcement
on levels of violence. That is, most studies found
that increasing drug law enforcement intensity
resulted in increased rates of drug market violence.
Notably, 9 of the 11 studies (82%) employing
regression analyses of longitudinal data found a
significant positive association between drug law
enforcement increases and increased levels of
violence. One study (9%) that employed a theoretical
model reported that violence was negatively
associated with increased drug law enforcement.
The present systematic review evaluated
all available English language peer-reviewed
research on the impact of law enforcement on
drug market violence. The available scientific
evidence suggests that increasing the intensity of
law enforcement interventions to disrupt drug
markets is unlikely to reduce drug gang violence.
Instead, the existing evidence suggests that drugrelated
violence and high homicide rates are likely
a natural consequence of drug prohibition and
that increasingly sophisticated and well-resourced

methods of disrupting drug distribution networks

may unintentionally increase violence. From an
evidence-based public policy perspective, gun
violence and the enrichment of organized crime
networks appear to be natural consequences of
drug prohibition. In this context, and since drug
prohibition has not achieved its stated goal of
reducing drug supply, alternative models for drug
control may need to be considered if drug supply
and drug-related violence are to be meaningfully
reduced.

Read the whole Story: icsdp

Gliederung:
1. Vorstellung der Krisenhilfe e.V. Bochum
2. Wie und warum wirken Opiate: Das Endorphin-System
3. Störungen durch Opiate
4. Zahlen zum Opiatgebrauch in Deutschland
5. Kurze Geschichte der Opiatersatzstoffbehandlung
6. Normativer Rahmen der Opiatersatzstoffbehandlung in Deutschland: BtMG, BtMVV, Leitlinie BÄK, RMvV
7. Zahlen zur Opiatersatzstoffbehandlung in Deutschland
8. Opiatersatzstoffbehandlung konkret (1): Auszug aus dem medizinischen Jahresbericht der Methadonambulanz Bochum
9. Die Bandbreite der Anwendung der Opiatersatzstoff-Behandlung erfordert ein Stufenmodell der Behandlung
10. Opiatersatzstoffbehandlung konkret (2): Der Behandlungsalltag bestimmt das Behandlungsergebnis
11. Opiatersatzstoffbehandlung konkret (3): Bonn – mehr als 300 PatientInnen werden durch einen Arzt substituiert
12. Behandlung nach dem SGB V – Schadensminimierung – Sucht auf Rezept
13. Zusammenfassung
14. Ausblick
15. Zu Risiken und Nebenwirkungen fragen Sie …:
Information zu den Wirkungen, Nebenwirkungen und Wechselwirkungen der Substitutionsmittel
16. Anhang: Spiegelartikel 1/2010: unmöglicher Spagat

Gutes Statistisches Material: 201002112-vortrag-dr-elsner

Ausgangslage
Seit über 15 Jahren leistet die Invalidenversicherung (IV) kollektive Leistungen an Institutionen
im Suchtbereich. Dies betrifft vor allem stationäre Angebote der Rehabilitation. Die
Beitragspraxis der IV muss sich im Rahmen der Gesetzgebung (IVG) und der Rechtsprechung
des Eidg. Versicherungsgerichtes (EVG) bewegen.
Das EVG hält seit den sechziger Jahren fest, dass (Drogen-)Sucht nicht für sich allein,
sondern nur in Verbindung mit einem die Erwerbsfähigkeit beeinträchtigenden geistigen oder
körperlichen Gesundheitsschaden mit Krankheitswert, der zur Sucht geführt hat oder als deren
Folge aufgetreten ist, eine Invalidität gemäss Art. 4 IVG begründen kann.
Gemäss IVG gilt als Invalidität die durch einen körperlichen oder geistigen Gesundheitsschaden
als Folge von Geburtsgebrechen, Krankheit oder Unfall verursachte, voraussichtlich
bleibende oder längere Zeit dauernde Erwerbsunfähigkeit. Gemäss WHO und auch gemäss
EVG hat Sucht Krankheitswert. Die geltende Rechtsprechung des EVG schliesst jedoch
grundsätzlich aus, dass Sucht per se eine Invalidität begründen kann.
Es geht nicht darum, jede drogenkonsumierende Person zu invalidisieren. Es gilt jedoch zu
prüfen, ob nicht Menschen, die wegen ihrer Suchtmittelabhängigkeit eine längerdauerende
Erwerbseinschränkung aufweisen, aufgrund theoretischer Überlegungen zu Unrecht von
Leistungen der Invalidenversicherung ausgeschlossen werden. Dieser Ausschluss wiederum
wirkt sich auf ganze Institutionen im Suchthilfebereich aus, da diese nur dann kollektive Leistungen
von der IV erhalten, wenn mindestens 50% ihrer Bewohner und Bewohnerinnen die
Kriterien des Art. 4 IVG erfüllen.
Unser Ziel ist es, dass der Zusammenhang von Invalidität und Sucht von Fachexperten und
Fachexpertinnen gemäss heutigem Stand der Wissenschaften aufgearbeitet wird.

Das ganze geht dann hier weiter:19980630_rapport_syntheseAl

Inhalt
1. Einleitung ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
2. Ablauf und Methode……………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
2.1 Dokumentationssystem ………………………………………………………………………………….4
2.2 Behandlungszentren und Patienten …………………………………………………………………. 5
2.3 Auswertungen……………………………………………………………………………………………….5
3. Ergebnisse …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6
3.1 Ausgangssituation der neu aufgenommenen Diamorphinpatienten……………………… 6
3.2 Behandlungsregime und Status der Diamorphinpatienten in 2008…………………….. 10
3.2.1 Behandlungsdauer, Behandlungsregime und Diamorphindosis………………….. 11
3.2.2 Die aktuelle Situation der Diamorphinpatienten………………………………………. 14
3.3 Verlauf langfristiger Diamorphinbehandlung …………………………………………………. 24
3.3.1 Die Entwicklung des Gesundheitszustands unter den Diamorphinpatienten… 25
3.3.2 Die Entwicklung der sozialen Situation und des Legalverhaltens ………………. 27
3.3.3 Die Entwicklung des Konsums von Alkohol und Drogen …………………………. 31
3.3.4 Dosierung ……………………………………………………………………………………………34
4. Bewertung der Ergebnisse……………………………………………………………………………………. 36
5. Literatur……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Lest den ganzen Bericht, lohnt sich schon allein wegen dem statistischen Material: Verthein_Haasen_2009_QS_Diamor_Zwischenbericht_II

Wie sieht eine optimale Behandlung für Suchtkranke aus? Die Psychiaterin Gabriele Fischer diskutiert mit dem Leiter der Wiener Drogenambulanz Hans Haltmayer

Standard: Welche Optionen haben Heroinabhängige, die von ihrer Sucht loskommen wollen?

Haltmayer: Wichtig ist, so viele Drogenkranke wie möglich vom Heroinkonsum und der damit verbundenen Beschaffungskriminalität wegzubekommen. Substitution ist die Therapie der ersten Wahl. Man ersetzt Heroin durch Medikamente. Dadurch stabilisiert man die Patienten, und über die Jahre entwickeln manche den Wunsch nach Abstinenz. Um möglichst viele zu erreichen, ist es wichtig, die Schwelle für so eine Behandlung so niedrig wie möglich zu halten. Wir haben Drogenspezialeinrichtungen, niedergelassene Ärzte, aber auch Kliniken, wo die Medikamente der Substitutionstherapie kontrolliert verschrieben werden.

Standard: Welche Medikamente stehen zur Verfügung?

Fischer: Es gibt keine aktuellen Statistiken für Österreich, die zeigen, welche Medikamente in der Erhaltungstherapie für Suchtkranke genau verschrieben werden. Wir wissen von der Wiener Gebietskrankenkasse, dass zwischen 13 und 17 Prozent der Opioidabhängigen mit Methadon behandelt werden, 20 Prozent mit Buprenorphin, allerdings nicht mit dem sicheren Kombinationsprodukt, das den Missbrauch erschwert und das international empfohlen wird. 65 Prozent bekommen retardierte Morphine, oral.

Standard: In der Behandlung werden Substitutionsmedikamente anders als vorgesehen verwendet, etwa gespritzt, weil dadurch die Wirkung verstärkt wird. Wie sehen Sie die Problematik des Missbrauchs?

Fischer: Eine Suchterkrankung ist psychiatrisch gesehen eine der schwersten Erkrankungen, die es gibt. Es gibt Missbrauch, das ist klar, das ist Teil des Krankheitsbildes. Wichtig ist, in der Behandlung Standards einzuhalten. Denn es gibt nicht das eine, beste Medikament, das die Sucht als chronische Erkrankung mit einem Schlag lösen würde. Wenn Missbrauch Teil des Krankheitsbildes ist, müssen Einrichtungen geschaffen werden, die eine fachlich fundierte, Evidenz-basierte Therapie anbieten. Es gibt derzeit keine einheitlich umgesetzten Richtlinien, nach denen gehandelt wird. Das ist ein Versäumnis der Gesundheitspolitik.

Haltmayer: Um Drogenkranke zu erreichen, brauchen wir aber ein möglichst breites Angebot. Das bezieht sich auf die Substanzen, aber auch auf die Betreuungs- und Versorgungseinrichtungen. Einem Qualitätsniveau müssen alle entsprechen, das ist selbstverständlich. Für Patienten, die sich aufgrund der Schwere ihrer Erkrankung nicht auf enge, strenge Strukturen wie etwa in einer Klinik einlassen können, muss es aber genauso Hilfe geben.

Fischer: Aber genau darin sehen Suchtkranke Ausweichmöglichkeiten und nutzen sie. Auch das ist ein Teil des Krankheitsbildes. Je klarer die Strukturen, umso leichter gelingt es, diese Patientengruppen zu stabilisieren.

Standard: Wie werden Drogenkranke im Ganslwirt, der sozialmedizinischen Drogenberatungsstelle, die Sie leiten, denn behandelt?

Haltmayer: Patienten, die bei uns andocken, bekommen in der Regel am dritten Tag zum ersten Mal ein Substitutionsmedikament.

Standard: Verpflichten Sie Patienten, auf illegale Drogen zu verzichten?

Haltmayer: Ja, das gehört zum Behandlungsvertrag. Aber es kommt bei jedem Drogenkranken zu Rückfällen. Sie sind Teil des Krankheitsbildes. Auch der Konsum anderer Substanzen, der sogenannte Beikonsum, ist Teil des Krankheitsbildes, und unser Ziel ist, dessen Ausmaß zu reduzieren.

Standard: Was vermitteln Sie über die Risiken des missbräuchlichen Spritzens von Substitutionsmitteln?

Haltmayer: Wir besprechen, wie beim intravenösen Gebrauch HIV, Hepatitis und andere Infektionen vermieden werden. Aber auch die Risiken des schnellen Anflutens und der Überdosierung bei intravenösem Gebrauch. Wir informieren über Alternativen.

Standard: Warum werden viele retardierte Morphine verschrieben?

Fischer: Sie sind der Stammsubstanz Heroin am ähnlichsten. Für einen Teil der Patienten kann es die optimale Therapie sein, aber nicht für alle. Da gilt es ganz genau zu differenzieren. Die psychiatrischen Abteilungen haben sich in den letzten Jahren viel zu wenig zuständig gefühlt. 70 Prozent der Opiatkranken sind bei Allgemeinmedizinern in Behandlung. Dieser Anteil ist angesichts des Schweregrads der Erkrankung zu hoch.

Haltmayer: Die Allgemeinmediziner haben sich immer schon für diese Patientengruppe verantwortlich gefühlt, viele Drogenkranke gehen gerne hin, weil sie gut betreut werden. Ich halte nicht viel von der Diskussion um Zuständigkeiten.

Fischer: Für Suchtkranke ist die Sucht nur das sichtbare, vordergründige Problem, sie haben viele andere psychiatrische Begleiterkrankungen wie Psychosen, Depressionen, viele sind traumatisiert. Man würde doch auch nicht Patienten mit Schizophrenie mehrheitlich von praktischen Ärzten behandeln lassen. Es gibt sicher Patienten, die stabil genug für die Betreuung beim Hausarzt sind, aber nicht in dieser international gänzlich unüblichen Verteilung. Kritisch zu hinterfragen sind Hausärzte in Wien, die 400 bis 600 Patienten pro Monat behandeln. Bei derart vielen Patienten können keine Qualitätsstandards eingehalten werden.

Haltmayer: Es gibt eine Reihe von Fortbildungen zur Substitutionsbehandlung, unter anderem auch von der Ärztekammer. Es gibt Qualitätszirkel, Kongresse, Fachgesellschaften. Das ist in allen Bereich der Medizin so. Das Problem sind jene Kollegen, die daran nicht teilnehmen.

Fischer: Wir haben bei der Behandlung von Suchtkranken aber mit einem riesigen Problem zu kämpfen: 65 Prozent der Patienten bekommen zu ihren Opioiden auch Benzodiazepine dazu verschrieben. Sie sind nicht Teil der Substitution, sondern werden dazu verschrieben, zur Beruhigung. Das ist eine Katastrophe, denn Benzodiazepine machen nach wenigen Wochen abhängig und verschlechtern langfristig den Krankheitsverlauf. Es sind gute Medikamente zur kurzfristigen Anwendung, aber sicher nicht für den Dauereinsatz bei Suchterkrankungen vorgesehen. Sie werden verschrieben, weil Begleiterkrankungen der Sucht nicht erkannt und adäquat therapiert werden. Das ist das Ergebnis eines unkoordinierten Systems.

Haltmayer: Die unkontrollierte Benzodiazepin-Verschreibung sehe ich auch als ein Problem. Da geht es aber um bessere Fortbildung, nicht um Verbote und Kriminalisierung. Es gibt sicher Patienten mit einer Benzodiazepin-Begleitabhängigkeit, und für die brauchen wir tatsächlich therapeutische Antworten.

Fischer: Ich denke, dass hat sich auch durch die Explosion der Verschreibung von retardierten Morphinen im niedergelassenen Bereich eingeschlichen. Das spricht jetzt nicht gegen diese Medikamentenklasse, es muss nur klarer sein, welcher Drogenkranke welche Medikamente bekommt. Da geht darum, Leitlinien der Fachgesellschaften umzusetzen.

Standard: Es gibt auch einen Schwarzmarkt für Morphine. Wie passiert es, dass verschreibungspflichtige Medikamente da hinkommen und gehandelt werden?

Haltmayer: Im Ganslwirt verordnen wir fast ausschließlich die tägliche kontrollierte Einnahme. Die Suchtkranken bekommen ihre Medikamente dann in der Apotheke. Im niedergelassenen Bereich ist das vielleicht weniger streng.

Standard: Bedeutet das, dass Suchtkranke, die Medikamente missbrauchen oder verkaufen, sie sich beim praktischen Arzt holen?

Haltmayer: Nein. Es gibt viele praktische Ärzte, die ihre Patienten so engmaschig betreuen, dass ihnen Missbrauch auffällt. Warum unterstellt man der Patientengruppe der Suchtkranken pauschal, dass sie Medikamente am Schwarzmarkt verkauft? Auch Schmerzpatienten erhalten Opiate in hohen Dosen, und niemand nimmt an, sie würden sie am Schwarzmarkt verkaufen. Die Stigmatisierung, die Suchtpatienten und ihre Ärzte belastet, zeigt sich auch im Gesetz: Die Substitution Drogensüchtiger ist die einzige medizinische Behandlung, die ausschließlich im Strafrecht geregelt ist.

Fischer: Das ist international so. Die Abgabe von Narkotika unterliegt genauen Regulativen, weil es eine besondere Sorgfalt gegenüber der Volksgesundheit gibt. Österreich hat ein sehr liberales System, und wir haben trotzdem nicht mehr als 50 Prozent in Behandlung.

Haltmayer: Das ist der Anteil in Wien, in ländlichen Gebieten ist die Versorgung sehr viel schlechter. Ein Problem besteht in der Politisierung der Versorgung von Drogenkranken. In dieser Diskussion spielen nämlich dann medizinische Kriterien nur noch eine untergeordnete Rolle. Die politische Lage in verschiedenen Staaten bestimmt das Behandlungsangebot so maßgeblich mit, dass die unterschiedlichen Systeme kaum mehr miteinander vergleichbar sind. Wie soll man Länder miteinander vergleichen, wenn nicht in jedem Land dieselben Medikamente in der Behandlung verwendet werden? Das Übertragen eines „besten Medikaments“ oder eines besten Systems“ von einem Land in ein anderes ist daher unmöglich. Es gibt unterschiedliche Substanzen, die da und dort anders abgegeben werden. Aber bei aller Unterschiedlichkeit der Substanzen und Systemen gibt es ein gemeinsames Grundproblem: Und das ist der Engpass beim Zugang. Wir haben ein extremes Stadt-Land-Gefälle, da ist Bedarf für Verbesserung.

Fischer: Es gibt zu viele Stellen, die insgesamt zu wenig koordiniert arbeiten. Das kritisiere ich, weil es besonders für die Behandlung von Suchtkranken kontraproduktiv ist. In Australien werden Suchtkranke schwerpunktmäßig an psychiatrischen Zentren behandelt, die für die Hausärzte auch ein Back-up-System sind. Kooperation halte ich für eine State-of-the-Art-Lösung.

Standard: Besteht eine Unterversorgung?

Haltmayer: Neben dem Stadt-Land-Gefälle gibt es viel zu wenige Einrichtungen, die Drogenkranke, die sich gesundheitlich und sozial stabilisiert haben, in der Behandlung der Begleiterkrankungen betreuen. So gibt es etwa kaum Plätze für Psychotherapie. Spezialeinrichtungen sind überlaufen, und niedergelassene Psychotherapeuten haben entweder keine Kassenverträge und wenn, dann keine freien Kapazitäten. Die wenigsten Drogenkranken können sich eine private Therapie leisten. Und als Back-up für den niedergelassenen Bereich ist die Psychiatrie schon in der Stadt kaum existent – und auf dem Land erst recht nicht. (DER STANDARD Printausgabe, 28.6.2010)

Baden-Württemberg will die umstrittene Herointherapie ab Juli ermöglichen. Das Land wird die neun geplanten Standorte finanziell unterstützen.

Stuttgart – Mit einer Verwaltungsvorschrift, die am 1. Juli 2010 in Kraft treten soll, will die Landesregierung die lange umstrittene Herointherapie für Schwerstabhängige unter ärztlicher Aufsicht ermöglichen. Ab diesem Zeitpunkt können die Regierungspräsidien dann ausgewählten Einrichtungen die Substitutionsbehandlung mit künstlich hergestelltem Heroin, dem sogenannten Diamorphin, erlauben. Das geht aus einer Kabinettsvorlage hervor, die der SÜDWEST PRESSE vorliegt. Sie soll am Dienstag verabschiedet werden. In Fachkreisen wird damit gerechnet, dass Karlsruhe und Stuttgart als erste Standorte einen Antrag auf die Herointherapie einreichen werden. Als weitere Standorte sind Ulm, Ravensburg, Tübingen/Reutlingen, Mannheim, Freiburg, Heilbronn und Singen vorgesehen.

Um die vom Bund vorgegebene Behandlungsform rasch umzusetzen, nimmt das Land selbst Geld in die Hand. Pro Standort sei ein „Investitionszuschuss in Höhe von 100 000 Euro“ erforderlich, schreibt Sozialministerin Monika Stolz (CDU) in der Vorlage. Nur in Karlsruhe, das die Therapie bereits erprobt hat, fällt die Summe mit 50 000 Euro geringer aus. Bis 2013 will das Sozialressort daher für den sukzessiven Ausbau der Standorte durch Umschichtungen in seinem Etat 850 000 Euro bereitstellen.

Mit dem geplanten Beschluss endet der jahrelange Konflikt um die Behandlung von bis 300 Schwerstabhängigen im Land. Laut einer bundesweiten Studie verbessert die verschreibungspflichtige Herointherapie den Gesundheitszustand extrem Süchtiger so weit, dass sie in eine ausstiegsorientierte Behandlung wechseln können. Außerdem wird die Beschaffungskriminalität vermindert und die Drogenszene gelichtet. Stolz hatte sich dieser Sichtweise früh angeschlossen, weite Teile ihrer Partei indes stellten die Studie in Frage. 2006 hatte sogar ein CDU-Landesparteitag das Projekt abgelehnt, das das Land wegen der Bundesgesetzgebung nun nicht mehr stoppen kann. Es hätte die Umsetzung indes verzögern könnten, worauf es nun aber verzichtet.

Die hohen Anfangskosten verursacht das strenge Sicherheitskonzept. Es schreibt etwa vor, dass Diamorphin nur in fensterlosen Räumen aus Stahlbeton gelagert werden darf. Die Außenwände müssen mit Körperschallmeldern versehen und der Zugang elektronisch kontrolliert werden. Die Räume, in denen der Ersatzstoff unter Aufsicht konsumiert werden darf, müssen permanent videoüberwacht und die Aufzeichnungen dürfen erst nach 48 Stunden gelöscht werden. Während der Verabreichung von Diamorphin müssen in der Einrichtung mindestens drei Fachkräfte anwesend sein.

Kommentar:

Es ist ein später Sieg der Vernunft, wenn sich die Landesregierung nun anschickt, die Herointherapie aktiv zu unterstützen. Denn die Ergebnisse einer bereits 2006 abgeschlossenen bundesweiten Vergleichsstudie sind eindeutig: Bei Schwerstabhängigen ist die ärztlich kontrollierte Therapie mit künstlichem Heroin dem bisherigen Ersatzmittel Methadon überlegen. Den Patienten geht es gesundheitlich besser und sie sind auch seltener kriminell als Methadon-Patienten. Das spricht für die Therapie und relativiert die hohen Anfangskosten beträchtlich.

Trotz der eindeutigen Faktenlage hat sich die Landes-CDU lange gegen die Herointherapie gesperrt – auch, weil sie glaubte, dass sie mit Hilfen für Junkies in konservativen Kreisen nicht punkten kann. Doch zum einen hat der Bund die Bedenken nicht geteilt. Zum anderen haben selbst exponierte Vertreter der Konservativen wie Hessens Noch-Regierungschef Roland Koch nach anfänglicher Skepsis die Vorteile der Therapie erkannt: weniger Junkies in Parks, weniger Dealer, weniger Kriminalität, weniger Drogentote.

Der anstehende Kabinettsbeschluss ist daher eine große Chance. Denn damit ist ein Thema abgearbeitet, das extrem ideologisch belastet war und viel Ressourcen und Aufmerksamkeit gebunden hat. Die Chance besteht darin, dass nun wieder mehr Kräfte frei werden für drängendere Probleme wie Missbrauch von Alkohol und Medikamenten. ROLAND MUSCHEL

Bei langjähriger und hochdosierter Methadonsubstitution ist nach Ansicht des Verwaltungsgerichts Osnabrück eine medizinisch-psychologische Begutachtung des Fahrerlaubnisinhabers auch dann erforderlich, wenn dessen behandelnder Arzt einen entsprechenden Therapieerfolg bestätigt und negative Auswirkungen der Substitution auf die Fahreignung verneint.

Gemäß § 46 Abs. 3 i.Vm. § 11 Abs. 8 FeV darf die Fahrerlaubnisbehörde auf die fehlende Eignung eines Fahrerlaubnisinhabers zum Führen von Kraftfahrzeugen schließen, wenn dieser sich weigert, sich einer nach den maßgeblichen verkehrsrechtlichen Vorschriften vorgesehenen Eignungsuntersuchung zu unterziehen und die Anordnung einer solchen Untersuchung ihrerseits rechtmäßig war1.

Nach §§ 3 Abs. 1 Satz 1 StVG, 46 Abs. 1 Satz 1 FeV ist, ohne dass der Behörde insoweit Ermessen eingeräumt ist, die Fahrerlaubnis zu entziehen, wenn sich deren Inhaber als ungeeignet zum Führen von Kraftfahrzeugen erweist. Ungeeignet in diesem Sinne ist gemäß § 46 Abs. 1 Satz 2 FeV insbesondere derjenige, bei dem Erkrankungen oder Mängel nach den Anlagen 4, 5 oder 6 vorliegen: da es sich auch bei Methadon um ein Betäubungsmittel im Sinne des Betäubungsmittelgesetzes handelt2, schließt dessen Einnahme die Kraftfahreignung des Antragstellers gemäß Nr. 9.1 der Anlage 4 ebenfalls grundsätzlich aus, weil es demjenigen, der als Drogenabhängiger mit Methadon substituiert wird, regelmäßig an der im Straßenverkehr erforderlichen hinreichend beständigen Anpassungs- und Leistungsfähigkeit fehlt3 und trotz der Methadon-Behandlung die Opiatabhängigkeit des Betroffenen zumindest auf psychischer Ebene weiter bestehen bleibt4; auf die Frage, ob der Betroffene unter dem Einfluss dieses Betäubungsmittels ggf. ein Kraftfahrzeug im Straßenverkehr geführt hat, kommt es dabei nicht an5.

Besondere Umstände, die Anlass zu einer Abweichung von der in Ziff. 9.1 aufgestellten Regelvermutung geben könnten6, sind im Hinblick auf die Methadonsubstitution nach Ansicht des Verwaltungsgerichts im Regelfall nicht gegeben. Zwar ist in Fällen der Methadonsubstitution in seltenen Ausnahmefällen eine positive Eignungsbeurteilung möglich, wenn dies durch besondere Umstände des Einzelfalles gerechtfertigt ist. Dazu gehören u.a. eine mehr als einjährige Methadonsubstitution, eine psychosoziale stabile Integration, die – durch geeignete, regelmäßige und zufällige Kontrollen während der Therapie nachgewiesene – Freiheit von Beigebrauch anderer psychoaktiv wirkender Substanzen einschließlich Alkohol seit mindestens einem Jahr, der Nachweis für Eigenverantwortung und Therapie-Compliance sowie das Fehlen einer Störung der Gesamtpersönlichkeit, wobei gerade den Persönlichkeits- und Leistungs- sowie den verhaltens- und sozialpsychologischen Befunden erhebliche Bedeutung für die Begründung einer positiven Regelausnahme zukommt7. Dieser Fragenkomplex kann regelmäßig nur auf der Grundlage einer medizinisch-psychologischen Begutachtung beantwortet werden8, so dass gegen eine diesbezügliche Gutachtenanordnung keine durchgreifenden Bedenken bestehen.

Da sich in dem vom Verwaltungsgericht Osnabrück entschiedenen Fall der Antragsteller einer medizinisch-psychologischen Begutachtung bislang (während der gesamten Dauer seiner Methadonbehandlung) nicht unterzogen hat, kann eine Ausnahme von der o.g. Regelvermutung ungeachtet dessen, dass im Laufe des vorliegenden Verfahrens zumindest eine mehr als einjährige Methadonsubstitution sowie eine entsprechend lange Freiheit von Beigebrauch anderer psychoaktiver Substanzen als Methadon nachgewiesen worden ist, derzeit nicht bejaht werden. Die vorgelegten Stellungnahmen seines behandelnden Arztes ersetzen – wie dieser letztlich selbst einräumt – eine medizinisch-psychologische Begutachtung durch dafür zugelassene Gutachter nicht; daher muss im vorliegenden Verfahren unberücksichtigt bleiben, dass der Arzt des Antragstellers offenbar über eine verkehrsmedizinische Qualifikation sowie über hinreichende Erfahrungen im Bereich der Methadonsubstitution verfügt und in seinen Stellungnahmen negative Auswirkungen der Methadoneinnahme auf die Fahreignung des Antragstellers ausdrücklich verneint hat.

Verwaltungsgericht Osnabrück, Beschluss vom 17. Juni 2010 – 6 B 42/10

  1. vgl. dazu BVerwG, Urteil vom 05.07.2001 – 3 C 13.01, NJW 2002, 78, m.w.N.
  2. vgl. Anlage III zu § 1 Abs. 1 BtMG
  3. vgl. Begutachtungs-Leitlinien zur Kraftfahrereignung, 6. Aufl., Leitsätze zu Nr. 3.12.1, S. 44
  4. vgl. Schubert/Schneider/Eisenmenger/Stephan, Kommentar zu den Begutachtungs-Leitlinien zur Kraftfahrereignung, 2. Aufl., Kap. 3.12.1, S. 173
  5. vgl. BayVGH, Beschluss vom 22.03.2007 – 11 CS 06.3306; OVG Saarland, Beschluss vom 27.03.2006 – 1 W 12/06, NJW 2006, 2651; OVG Bremen, Beschluss vom 16.03.2005 – 1 S 58/05, NordÖR 2005, 263; Hentschel/ König/Dauer, Straßenverkehrsrecht, 40. Aufl., § 2 StVG Rn. 17 k
  6. vgl. insoweit Nr. 3 der Vorbemerkung zu Anlage 4
  7. vgl. Begutachtungs-Leitlinien zur Kraftfahrereignung, Leitsätze zu Nr. 3.12.1, S. 44
  8. vgl. Nds. OVG, Beschluss vom 03.04.2000 – 12 M 1216/00; OVG Saarland, a.a.O.; OVG Hamburg, Beschluss vom 06.12.1996 – Bs VI 104/96

Quelle: http://www.rechtslupe.de/verwaltungsrecht/entzug-der-fahrerlaubnis-bei-methadonsubstitution-320006

Im § 5 der Betäubungsmittel-Verschreibungs-Verordnung ist der Vergabemodus der Heroinsubstitutionsmittel detailliert vorgeschrieben. Nach mindestens sechsmonatiger erfolgreicher Teilnahme an einem Methadonprogramm kann den Drogenabhängigen das Substitutionsmittel in einer Menge von maximal sieben Tagesrationen „in einer zur parenteralen Anwendung nicht verwendbaren gebrauchsfertigen Form“ zur eigenverantwortlichen Einnahme überlassen werden. Aus der Drogenszene ergab sich der Verdacht, daß die Methadontrinklösung nicht selten intravenös injiziert wird. Die möglichen Auswirkungen der Inhaltsstoffe werden angesprochen. Eine dadurch bedingte Gefährdung von Suchtkranken läßt sich vermeiden, wenn man versucht, die Injektion einer Methadontrinklösung durch geeignete Zubereitung oder Zusätze „unattraktiv“ zu machen.
Schlüsselwörter: Methadon, orale Opiatsubstitution, intravenöse Injektion

Bei Drogenabhängigen ergab sich der Verdacht, daß die im Rahmen des Methadonprogramms abgegebene Methadon-Trinklösung nicht oral eingenommen, sondern intravenös injiziert wurde. Behandelnde Ärzte hatten die Möglichkeit einer intravenösen Zufuhr der Methadontrinklösung nicht in Betracht gezogen, maßgeblich unter der Vorstellung, daß diese „in einer zur parenteralen Anwendung nicht verwendbaren gebrauchsfertigen Form“ abgegeben wurde. Festgestellte punktionsverdächtige Hautverletzungen wurden auf einen Beikonsum anderer intravenöser Drogen zurückgeführt. Daß Süchtige eine intravenöse Applikation der Methadontrinklösung praktizieren, wurde beschrieben (6, 12, 19). In einer epidemiologischen Untersuchung in Australien von Darke et al. (6), gaben 50 Prozent aller befragten Substituierten in einem Methadonprogramm an, bereits Methadonsirup, der ausschließlich zur oralen Applikation bestimmt war, injiziert zu haben, 26 Prozent davon während ihrer gesamten Behandlungsdauer mindestens einmal wöchentlich. Maßgeblich dafür war die Verteilung durch Freunde/Bekannte sowie die eigene, nach Hause mitgenommene Dosis.


Der Modus der Heroinsubstitution

Die Abgabe des verkehrs- und verschreibungsfähigen Betäubungsmittels Methadon zur Substitutionsbehandlung Opiatabhängiger unterliegt den Regelungen des Betäubungsmittelgesetzes (BtMG) und der BetäubungsmittelVerschreibungs Verordnung (BtMVV). Es ergeben sich aus der gesetzlichen Vorschrift über die Durchführung der Methadonbehandlung (§ 5 der BtMVV) für die Diskussion zwei wesentliche Aspekte. Solange der Patient nicht seit mindestens sechs Monaten und ohne Unregelmäßigkeiten am Methadonprogramm teilnimmt (§ 5, Absatz 7 der BtMVV), ist „das Substitutionsmittel . . . dem Patienten vom behandelnden Arzt, seinem ärztlichen Vertreter oder von dem von ihm angewiesenen . . . Personal zum unmittelbaren Verbrauch zu überlassen“ (Absatz 5). „Zum unmittelbaren Verbrauch“ beinhaltet, daß die orale Einnahme täglich beobachtet werden muß, das heißt auch an Wochenenden oder Feiertagen und nach Absatz 6: „im Falle einer ärztlich bescheinigten Pflegebedürftigkeit, bei einem Hausbesuch“.
Nach mindestens sechsmonatiger, erfolgreicher Therapie kann „der Arzt oder sein ärztlicher Vertreter . . . dem Patienten einmal in der Woche eine Verschreibung über die für bis zu sieben Tage benötigte Menge des Substitutionsmittels aushändigen und ihm dessen eigenverantwortliche Einnahme erlauben“. In diesem Fall muß jedoch nach Absatz 3 „das Substitutionsmittel in einer zur parenteralen Anwendung nicht verwendbaren gebrauchsfertigen Form“ verschrieben werden. Zugelassen sind Levomethadon (L-Polamidon), das von Hoechst zu diesem Zweck in einer ausdrücklich zur oralen Applikation zubereiteten Form angeboten wird und das D,LMethadon-Razemat. Die praktische Erfahrung der letzten Jahre zeigt, daß überwiegend – offensichtlich aus Kostengesichtspunkten – das Methadon-razemat unter Zusatz verschiedener Additiva als Trinklösung (deren Inhaltsstoffe in den Tabellen 1 und 2 aufgelistet sind) zum Einsatz kommt. Die folgenden Überlegungen beziehen sich daher auf diese Form der Substitutionstherapie. Grundsätzlich sollte eine 1,0prozentige Lösung verschrieben werden. In streng zu begründenden Ausnahmefällen kann eine vereinfachte Zubereitung hergestellt werden (17). Eine intravenöse Injektion soll nach der Vorschrift des „Neuen Rezeptur-Formulariums“ (NRF) (1) durch den Zusatz einer viskosen Grundlösung und der Aroma-Farbmittel-Konzentrate, wie in Tabelle 1 und 2 dargestellt, verhindert werden.
Die Hydroxyethylzellulose 400 (HEZ) bewirkt eine erhöhte Viskosität der Lösung, durch übliche 20-GInjektionsnadeln ist eine zügige Injektion aber durchaus möglich. HEZ mit einer mittleren Molekularmasse von 400 000 Dalton ist vergleichbar mit Hydroxyethylstärke (HES), die mit einer Molekularmasse von 450 000 Dalton seit etwa 25 Jahren als Plasmaexpander verwandt wird. Die intravenöse Applikation von HEZ 400 stellte sich in Tierversuchen mit verschiedenen Spezies als nicht akut toxisch heraus (11, 16, 18). Bei Hunden wurden auch nach wiederholten Injektionen keine Speicherphänomene festgestellt, obwohl ihnen – wie auch dem Menschen – ein Enzym zur Spaltung der Zellulose fehlt (11).
Hohe Konzentrationen von Saccharose und Glycerol bewirken eine hohe Osmolarität der Lösung und dadurch eine schmerzhafte Reizung, eventuell eine Thrombosierung der Venen bei intravenöser Zufuhr. Dieser Effekt läßt sich durch Verdünnung und/oder langsame Injektion vermeiden. Saccharose wird innerhalb von Stunden unverändert renal eliminiert (20), und Glycerol geht auf verschiedenen Wegen in den Kohlehydrat- oder Fettstoffwechsel ein, weswegen es auch zur parenteralen Ernährung intravenös verabreicht wird.
Eine intensive Blau- oder Gelbfärbung sowie die Aromatisierung der Lösung stellen den größten Unsicherheitsfaktor dar. Es wurde über allergische Reaktionen gegen Chinolingelb berichtet (5), das nur für den oralen Gebrauch empfohlen wird. Nach Tierversuchen wird der Farbstoff nach intravenöser Zufuhr unverändert mit der Galle und im Urin ausgeschieden (26). Contramarum als Flüssigaroma enthält natürliche und naturidentische Aromastoffe in alkoholischer Lösung (Ethanol). Patentblau wird als Diagnostikum zur Beurteilung der Durchblutung sowie in experimentellen Studien häufig intravasal injiziert. Über Nebenwirkungen – ausschließlich allergischer Art – wurde äußerst selten berichtet (2, 13). Neben allergischen Reaktionen (21) und Herzrhythmusstörungen nach Resorption des Pfefferminzöls (23) wurden Eigenschaften von Menthol in vitro beschrieben (22), die denen von Kalziumkanal-Antagonisten ähnlich sind. Weitere Bestandteile der fertigen Lösung sind Zitronensäure, die im Empfängerorganismus im Zitrazyklus metabolisiert wird, und als Konservierungsmittel kommt Methyl- und Propyl-4-hydroxybenzoat zum Einsatz. Diese Kombination findet sich, ebenso wie der Lösungsvermittler Propylenglykol, in zahlreichen zur intravenösen Injektion bestimmten Zubereitungen. Macrogol-Glycerolhydroxystearat entspricht bis auf eine Hydroxyl-Gruppe dem zum parenteralen Gebrauch verwendeten Macrogol-Glycerolrizinoleat und hat sich in Tierversuchen bei intravenöser Applikation als weniger toxisch erwiesen (3, 4, 14).
Gefahren der i.v.-Applikation
Es ist also durchaus möglich, die Methadontrinklösung in ein Blutgefäß zu injizieren. Welche systemischen gesundheitlichen Schädigungen die Inhaltsstoffe verursachen können, ist nicht mit letzter Sicherheit vorauszusehen. Hypersensitive Reaktionen können erwartet werden, jedoch scheint die Injektion nach den oben angeführten Erläuterungen nicht so akut gefährlich zu sein wie zunächst angenommen.
Zu beachten bleibt letztlich noch die Gefährdung durch den Wirkstoff Methadon. Der klinische Einsatz des Methadons als intravenöses Analgetikum wird diskutiert (8, 15). Geschwinde (7) schätzt als „äußerst gefährliche Dosis“ im Hinblick auf die Atemdepression bei intravenöser Zufuhr 20 mg Levomethadon. Demgegenüber wurde von Darke et al. (6) als mittlere Dosis der Methadoninjektionen 50 mg angegeben, 40 Prozent der Süchtigen hätten schon mehr als 100 mg an einem Tag injiziert. Etwa ein Viertel aller Betroffenen habe den Sirup in unverdünntem Zustand injiziert, Komplikationen seien in der Form von Spritzenabszessen (23 Prozent der Befragten) und venösen Thrombosen (16 Prozent) beziehungsweise Venenverödungen (27 Prozent) aufgetreten.
Kann i.v.-Applikation vermieden werden?
Man sollte nicht vergessen, daß eine Substitutionstherapie mit Methadon keine kausale Behandlung der Sucht darstellt, sondern lediglich den Austausch der illegalen Droge Heroin gegen die – als legal definierte – Droge Methadon. Das Suchtverhalten mit der „Gier nach dem Kick“ besteht unverändert. Methadon durchdringt die Blut-Hirn-Schranke um ein Vielfaches besser als Morphin. Für den Konsumenten hat die rasche Anflutung bei der intravenösen Applikation gegenüber der oralen Aufnahme den „Vorteil“ des Rauscherlebens. Drogenerfahrene Versuchspersonen konnten die Wirkung intravenös verabreichten Levomethadons nicht von der des Heroins unterscheiden (1). Wer sich mit Drogenabhängigen beschäftigt, kennt die Experimentierfreudigkeit und die Risikobereitschaft gerade jüngerer Süchtiger, neue Drogen und Konsummethoden auszuprobieren. Daß dabei auch eine zur oralen Einnahme präparierte Methadonlösung oder Lösungen anderer oraler Präparate (Aufschwämmungen zerstampfter Tabletten) versuchsweise intravenös appliziert werden und Komplikationen verursachen, ist berichtet worden (6, 10, 12, 19, 24). Epidemiologische Studien über die Situation in Deutschland wurden noch nicht publiziert.
Methadon auf dem Schwarzmarkt
Ein Drittel aller mit Methadon assoziierten Drogentoten im Kreis Hamburg war zuvor zu keinem Zeitpunkt offiziell in ärztlicher Substitutionsbehandlung (9). Die kontrollierte Methadonabgabe nach § 5 BtMVV soll einem illegalen Methadonhandel entgegenwirken. Ein Teil des illegal gehandelten Methadons wurde von Ärzten im Rahmen der Opiatsubstitutionstherapien überlassen. Da das Problem eines illegalen Handels mit Methadon bekannt ist, wird in „Der Arzneimittelbrief“ (25) eine Sprechprobe gefordert, um sicherzugehen, daß das eingenommene Methadon auch geschluckt wurde! Häufige Fehler bei der Methadonabgabe und damit Quellen für Unbefugte sind nach der eigenen Erfahrung:
– Die Teilung der täglichen Dosis in eine unter Aufsicht und eine im Laufe des Tages einzunehmende Portion. (Hierfür besteht aufgrund der langen Halbwertszeit im allgemeinen keine Indikation, im Ausnahmefall müßte die Einnahme der zweiten Portion ebenfalls beaufsichtigt werden.)
– Die Abgabe einer „Wochenend- oder Überbrückungsration“ an – unabhängig von der Dauer der Substitutionstherapie – nicht ausreichend verantwortungsvolle Patienten. Eine Kontrolle durch chemischtoxikologische Untersuchungen, wieviel Methadon tatsächlich eingenommen wurde, ist nicht möglich.
Die Erfahrung hat gezeigt, daß eine richtige Einschätzung des Verantwortungsbewußtsein beim opiatsubstituierten Süchtigen im Umgang mit der Methadonlösung nicht immer gelingt. Eine erfolgreiche, mindestens sechsmonatige Teilnahme am Methadonprogramm, wie im § 5 Abs. 7 der BtMVV festgelegt, kann nur als grober Anhaltspunkt dienen. Die neueste Novellierung des Betäubungsmittelrechtes (10. BtMÄndV), mit der diese Frist von zwölf auf sechs Monate reduziert wurde, ist sicher ein Schritt in die falsche Richtung.
Bedenkt man die bereits angesprochene Unzuverlässigkeit der Drogensüchtigen, ist die Frage berechtigt, warum überhaupt bewußt eine gesundheits- und eventuell lebensgefährdende Zubereitungsform an Süchtige abgegeben wird. Um die unnötige zusätzliche Gefährdung der Suchtkranken zu vermeiden, kann es sinnvoll sein, die Injektion der Methadonlösung auf unschädliche Weise unattraktiver zu machen. Darke et al. (6) schlagen erstens eine höhergradige Verdünnung des Methadons (ohne gesundheitsgefährdende Additiva) vor, wodurch sich die Injektion aufgrund der benötigten großen Volumina erschwert, zweitens den Zusatz von Naloxon, das nur bei parenteraler Zufuhr wirksam werden kann. Als bedenklich ist hier allerdings eine Gefährdung durch die stark unterschiedlichen Halbwertszeiten anzusehen. Die orale Einnahme kann trotz dieser Überlegungen als Voraussetzung zur Teilnahme an einer Opiatsubstitution angesehen werden, da die längerfristige intravenöse Zufuhr seitens des Drogenabhängigen in hohem Maße die fehlende Bereitschaft zeigt, das Suchtverhalten tatsächlich zu überwinden.

ps: dieser Artikel ist etwas aelter und entspricht bei der Vergabe nicht mehr den ueblichen Standarts!

ABSTRACT
Objectives To examine survival and long term cessation of
injecting in a cohort of drug users and to assess the
influence of opiate substitution treatment on these
outcomes.
Design Prospective open cohort study.
Setting A single primary care facility in Edinburgh.
Participants 794 patients with a history of injecting drug
use presenting between 1980 and 2007; 655 (82%) were
followed up by interview or linkage to primary care records
and mortality register, or both, and contributed 10 390
person years at risk; 557 (85%) had received opiate
substitution treatment.
Main outcome measures Duration of injecting: years from
first injection to long term cessation, defined as last
injection before period of five years of non-injecting;
mortality before cessation; overall survival.
Results In the entire cohort 277 participants achieved
long term cessation of injecting, and 228 died. Half of the
survivors had poor health related quality of life. Median
duration from first injection to death was 24 years for
participants with HIV and 41 years for those without HIV.
For each additional year of opiate substitution treatment
the hazard of death before long term cessation fell 13%
(95% confidence interval 17% to 9%) after adjustment for
HIV, sex, calendar period, age at first injection, and
history of prison and overdose. Conversely exposure to
opiate substitution treatment was inversely related to the
chances of achieving long term cessation.
Conclusions Opiate substitution treatment in injecting
drug users in primary care reduces this risk of mortality,
with survival benefits increasing with cumulative
exposure to treatment. Treatment does not reduce the
overall duration of injecting.
INTRODUCTION
Injection drug use is an important public health problem
with a prevalence of around 1-2% among young
adults in the United Kingdom and a standardised mortality
ratio over 10 times that of the general
population.1 Deaths in those who inject opiates are
mainly a consequence of overdose and bloodborne
infection.2 The principal treatment for dependent
users is opiate substitution therapy, commonly oral
methadone,3 which in the UK is mostly delivered in
primary care settings. Opiate substitution treatment
can reduce opiate use, mortality, and transmission of
bloodborne infections, though most evidence comes
from relatively short term studies.4-8
Short periods of cessation from injecting are relatively
common,9 but few studies have long enough follow-
up to observe long term cessation, and the impact
of opiate substitution treatment on the overall duration
of injecting is unclear.10
We report on a follow-up study of the Edinburgh
addiction cohort.11 This study included injecting drug
users, most of whom were using heroin, recruited
through Muirhouse Medical Group, a single primary
care facility in a deprived area of Edinburgh, during a
rapid local HIV epidemic.12 We describe the duration
of injecting and survival and assess the influence of
opiate substitution treatment and other factors on
these outcomes.
METHODS
Data source
Methods are described in detail elsewhere.11 13 Briefly,
between 1980 and 2006 all patients at a large primary
care facility in Edinburgh who reported a history of
injecting drug use were recruited to the study. Opiate
substitution treatment was publicly funded and accessible
to patients throughout the study period, in keeping
with national guidelines. Cohort members were
flagged with the General Register Office for Scotland
to allow for tracing of deaths and changes of general
practitioner. From October 2005 to November 2007
we attempted to contact all surviving cohort members
to conduct a follow-up interview. Information was also
collected from primary care notes when these were
available.

Read the whole study, it is the longest ever:Methadon, scotland

The revelation that the number of opium-addicted Afghan children has reached new highs is a sad unintended consequence of that war. It dramatically illustrates how adult war games can doom generations of children to a miserable life, argues César Chelala. Worse, it is a growing problem in neighboring Iran and Pakistan as well.
A group of researchers hired by the U.S. Department of State found staggering levels of opium in Afghan children, some as young as 14 months old, who had been passively exposed by adult drug users in their homes.
In 25% of homes where adult addicts lived, children tested showed signs of significant drug exposure, according to the researchers.

According to one of the researchers, the children exhibit the typical behavior of opium and heroin addicts. If the drug is withdrawn, they go through a withdrawal process.

The results of the study should sound an alarm. Not only were opium products found in indoor air samples, but their concentrations were also extremely high. This suggests that, as with second-hand cigarette smoke, contaminated indoor air and surfaces pose a serious health risk to women’s and children’s health.

The extent of health problems in children as a result of such exposure is not known. What is known is that the number of Afghan drug users has increased from 920,000 in 2005 to over 1.5 million, according to Zalmai Afzali, the spokesman for the Ministry of Counter-Narcotics (MCN) in Afghanistan.

A quarter of those users are thought to be women and children. Afzali stated that Afghanistan could become the world’s top drug-using nation per capita if current trends continue.

According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), no other country in the world produces as much heroin, opium and hashish as Afghanistan — a sad distinction for a country already ravaged by war.

This may explain why control efforts so far have been concentrated on poppy eradication and interdiction to stem exports, while less attention was paid to the rising domestic addiction problem, particularly in children.

Both American and Afghan counter narcotic officials have said that such widespread domestic drug addiction is a relatively new problem. Among the factors leading to increased levels of drug use is on a high unemployment rate throughout the country, the social upheaval provoked by this war and those that preceded it, as well as the return of refugees from Iran and Pakistan who became addicts while abroad.

In both those countries, the high number of opium-addicted children is also a serious problem, particularly among street children. In Tehran, although the government has opened several shelters for street children, many more centers are still needed to take care of them.

According to some estimates, there are between 35,000 and 50,000 children in Tehran who are forced by their parents or other adults to live and beg in the streets or to work in sweatshops.

These children are subject to all kinds of abuse, and many among them end up in organized prostitution rings and become part of the sex trade. They are transported to other countries where they are obliged to work as prostitutes, while others simply disappear.

The situation is equally serious in Pakistan, where in Karachi alone there are tens of thousands of children who are addicted, as drug trafficking prevails all over the city. In Karachi, the main addiction is to hashish.

According to Rana Asif Habib, president of the Initiator Human Development Foundation (IHDF), due to the increase in the number of street children, the street crime rate is also on the rise as children get involved in drug trafficking activities in the city.

Injecting drug users face the additional risk of HIV-infection through the sharing of contaminated syringes. “Drug addiction and HIV/AIDS are, together, Afghanistan’s silent tsunami,” declared Tariq Suliman, director of the Nejat’s rehabilitation center to the UN Office for Humanitarian Affairs.

There are about 40 treatment centers for addicts dispersed throughout the country, but most are small, poorly staffed and under-resourced.

For the first time ever, an international team including World Health Organization (WHO) officials and experts from Johns Hopkins University and the Medical University of Vienna have joined efforts to design a treatment regime for young children.

The United States and its allies have the resources to rapidly expand and adequately fund and resource such treatment and rehabilitation centers throughout the country. Anything less will be yet another serious indictment of an occupation gone astray.

source: http://www.theglobalist.com/printSto…x?StoryId=8472

In April 2007 Ciudad Juárez—the sprawling Mexican border city girding El Paso, Texas—won a Foreign Direct Investment magazine award for “North American large cities of the future.” With an automotive workforce rivaling Detroit’s and hundreds of export-processing plants, businesses in Juárez employed 250,000 factory workers, and were responsible for nearly one-fifth of the value of U.S.-Mexican trade. The trans-border region of 2.4 million people had one of the hemisphere’s highest growth rates.

Just three years later, as many as 125,000 factory jobs and 400,000 residents have vanished. More than ten thousand small businesses have closed, and vast stretches of residential and commercial areas are abandoned. It is no surprise that the Great Recession temporarily shuttered factories and forced layoffs in a city intimately tied to American consumers. Mexico’s economy contracted by 5.6 percent in 2009, far worse than the United States’s “negative growth” of about 2 percent.

But Juárez has suffered from much more than recession. Its murder rate now makes it the deadliest city in the world, including cities in countries at war with foreign enemies. On average, there are more than seven homicides each day, many in broad daylight. Some 10,000 combat-ready federal forces are now stationed in Juárez; their armored vehicles roll up and down the same arteries as semis tightly packed with HDTVs bound for the United States. Factory managers wake up in El Paso—one of the safest U.S. cities—and go to work in the plants of a city bathed in blood.

To Americans the most notable killing was the March assassination of a U.S. consular employee and her husband on their way home from a child’s birthday party. Witnesses say their car was chased down a boulevard that once symbolized peace between the United States and Mexico and mutual prosperity. It rammed a curb within yards of the bridge to El Paso. Though the killing took place practically under the noses of armed forces stationed in the highly sensitive area, just a few bullet casings were recovered from the scene, indicating that the executioners took their time to clean up and cover their tracks.

Three weeks later the army arrested the alleged killer—a member of a gang aligned with the Juárez Cartel—but almost no one believes this crime will ever be “solved.” And with good reason. In recent years less than 2 percent of Mexican homicide cases have concluded with the sentencing of the perpetrator. In Juárez alone, there are some 200 unidentified corpses dating back to January 2008. As of June 2010 Juárez is in its 30th month of open warfare.

Can Juárez be saved? Will the factories reopen, as they have after past economic downturns, or is the city too dangerous for the business of making legal consumer goods? The economic questions are, perhaps, beside the point. For even if legal manufacturing returns, salvation may remain a distant goal. The economic model—low-wage export-oriented assembly—that investors celebrated also helped Juárez become the illegal narcotics capital of the Western hemisphere, perhaps indelibly.

A tale of two cities
I first got to know Juárez during the 1990s, when I lived and worked there as a graduate student in anthropology. It was exciting then: Juárez was at the heart of debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Coming fast on the heels of the Soviet collapse in 1989, NAFTA launched the current era of globalization. In Juárez I had a front-row seat for the unfolding of free trade.

It was a place of head-spinning extremes—gleaming high-tech industrial parks ringed by worker slums. One of the world’s most profitable Walmarts sat within view of settlements without decent water, sewers, or paved roads. Amid the inequalities, however, ordinary, middle-class Juarenses were enthusiastic about their city’s future.
I recently returned to Juárez and was unprepared for the city’s shocking transformation. Friends cautioned against crossing the border. Some had closed their businesses there, or had moved their families north. A few warily ventured into Juárez, but they always hurried back to the United States before dark. For the first time, I heard the once-optimistic Juarenses lament their city.

The economic model that investors celebrated helped Juárez to become the illegal narcotics capital of the Western Hemisphere.
Some see the roots of Juárez’s violence in its recovery from the Mexican Revolution, which ravaged what was in the 1910s and ’20s a frontier town. Certainly part of the city’s personality—and maybe its pathology—can be traced to that period.

Like its booming neighbor to the north, it needed schools, libraries, and hospitals. Instead it got bars and whorehouses. Because of Prohibition, El Pasoans had to find their entertainment across the border, in the richly appointed American-owned casinos and nightclubs. Juárez of the 1920s was like Las Vegas of the 1950s: elegant, exotic, uninhibited.
Older Juarenses speak of the post-Revolution city as if it were two: by day Juárez was a quiet Mexican town modeling itself on the progress it saw in the United States. At night it morphed into a world of exported vice and carnal pleasure. The growth of Fort Bliss during World War II and El Paso’s lingering blue laws reinforced that split personality.

In the late 1960s an experiment in export-oriented manufacturing seemed to give Juárez-by-day the upper hand. Under an agreement between the U.S. and Mexican governments, American firms set up shop across the border and imported materials duty-free from the United States. The companies employed Mexican labor to transform those materials into finished goods for export back, also duty-free. The firms, called maquilas by the locals, found favorable conditions: third-world wages, a government that promoted unionization in name only, and no oversight of the treatment of manufacturing byproducts. Moreover, maquila managers could work “overseas” during the day, and return home at night, thereby avoiding Mexican poverty, environmental problems, and crime. Success begets competition. The trickle of U.S. firms that abandoned their costly Midwestern labor forces became a torrent in the 1980s.

But while Juárez-by-day had triumphed for the time being, Juárez-by-night had not been tamed completely. Factory managers loved their assignments: they enjoyed the comfort and security of their El Paso homes, and, when they wanted, the thrill of Juárez nightlife, including the venues that everyone suspected were fronts for drug money.

Global change comes home
In the summer of 1992, during my first visit to Juárez, a change was snaking its way through the city’s impoverished working-class settlements. Deteriorating rural economic conditions, together with relatively high maquila wages (typically $5-7 a day) prompted a huge immigration to Juárez. The steady stream of potential workers—more than a hundred new residents arrived each day in the 1990s—kept wages down and the costs of housing and services up. Despite their improved conditions, then, workers could enjoy few benefits from their labor. They struggled to meet basic needs, including fees for schooling that would qualify their children for factory work once they were old enough to earn a living.

All the families I met relied on at least one factory salary. But there were plenty of unemployed, too. Mostly young men, these idlers were the right age to be working or in school, but instead they hung around wearing baggy Dickie pants, hair nets, and other insignia of cholo (gang) affiliation. My research assistant, a former Catholic catechist, taught me to recognize and steer clear of the real cholos, who were dangerous, and to salute and acknowledge the others, who were just posing.

The settlements blanketing the steep ravines of the mountains surrounding the city’s center had no infrastructure to speak of, but they did have corners. And boys hung out on those corners day and night. They huddled on their haunches in winter and they lolled in whatever shade they could find in summer. They were guarding turf; they menaced the school kids and factory workers forced to cross their paths, sometimes beating them bloody.

Some idlers were getting high, though not from illegal narcotics. Rather, they mined stolen factory materials—paint thinner, acetone, and buckets of solvent-soaked rags used to wipe down finished televisions. They would distribute “sniffs” to their neighborhood buddies.

But in the mid-1990s life for these young men began to take on another character. A friend who worked in drug treatment told me that she and her co-workers were scrambling to identify new addictions, as banned drugs supplanted the inhalants.

On a 1996 tour of settlements, my friend showed me some of the places where dealers had set up shop. They were not selling injectable narcotics—a syringe was an extravagance in these desperately poor communities—but drugs that could be consumed directly. She spoke of pills, though their identification was elusive. These small retail outlets laid the groundwork for the harder stuff that would soon follow. Over time I realized what the idle kids were up to. They were working, perhaps earning only pennies, for the new dealers.

My observations in Juárez reflected a shift in global drug markets that began far from the city. As globalization of manufacturing ramped up in the 1980s, it did so in parallel with dramatic changes in the production, distribution, and consumption of illegal narcotics. In the early ’90s the global pressures that disrupted the trade routes for cocaine that ran from Andean jungles to U.S. consumer markets converged on Juárez.

This was not obvious then. The local change that seemed most consequential for Mexico’s future was the 1992 election of an opposition party member as mayor of Juárez. Francisco Villarreal Torres, owner of a small chain of house-ware stores and a political outsider, campaigned on promises of good governance and clean conduct. His election proved the viability of the National Action Party (PAN), which went on to win the 2000 presidential election, thereby ending 70 years of one-party rule.

Villarreal’s true rival once he took office was not his political opponent, but Amado Carrillo Fuentes, the subordinate, rival, and successor of famed rural drug lord Pablo Acosta, who died in a 1987 shoot-out with Mexican and U.S. forces. Carillo Fuentes moved operations from the sparsely populated Big Bend region of Texas to Juárez, a relocation that mirrored and exploited the globalization-driven economic success of Juárez.

Acosta’s business had focused on smuggling Mexican pot and heroin across the border to U.S. buyers. Distribution was in the hands of informal dealer networks, from which, reportedly, Acosta only infrequently took a direct cut. With two significant changes to Acosta’s business model, Carrillo Fuentes would turn cocaine into the cornerstone of a multinational, vertically integrated enterprise with diversified products stretching from the Andes (and other source sites) to United States (and other) markets.

In the past, Colombians had used Mexican marijuana smugglers to transport only a small portion of their merchandise; the main trafficking routes wound through the Caribbean. By some estimates, cocaine importation and money laundering accounted for a third of Miami’s economic activity in the 1980s. But the 1993 killing of Pablo Escobar decapitated the Medellín Cartel, and, beginning in 1991, the Cali Cartel was weakened by seizures and arrests (though its leaders remained at large until 1995). When the U.S. Department of Justice began to seize Miami bank assets and prosecute the Colombian traffickers’ lawyers, the Mexican cocaine trade picked up pace and volume.

Trafficking drugs is effectively a licensed affair, the exclusive and protected rights to which are controlled by the military and the police.
Seeing his opening, Carrillo Fuentes shifted from bagman to distributor—the first of his two innovations. He also took advantage of another vacuum: in the years prior to his rise, the prosecutorial assault on crack-cocaine in the United States had jailed and killed thousands of street-level dealers and their bosses. Carrillo Fuentes filled that void with his own retail agents in U.S. cities.

Like any vendor, Carrillo Fuentes looked for new markets and new products. And like transnational firms that sprawled across the city, he saw a business opportunity in the booming factory-worker population of Juárez. His second innovation—perhaps the single action most responsible for the rise in violence—was to call an end to drug traffickers’ long-standing voluntary prohibition against local sales.

Local-market development began modestly enough. Sometime in 1990 or 1991—before the Colombian cartels had ceded their supremacy—residents in a handful of Juárez’s scrappy, tar-paper-and-adobe settlements found their first samples of a narcotic previously limited to export markets: cocaine. It was neither pure nor of high quality—cut several times with talc and baking powder—but it was coke, for the first time, for the Mexican masses.

Gustavo de la Rosa Hickerson, long-time human rights attorney and director of the city’s prison from 1995 until 1998, described to me the explosion of tienditas, retail drug outlets. According to de la Rosa, in 1990 there were fewer than 50 neighborhood dealers. By 1995 the number had climbed to 300. The current estimate exceeds 1,000. Some of these tienditas are distribution centers, employing as many as 50 roving peddlers. And the city is now saturated with dealer-addicts, the “fivers” who sell just enough (about five hits) to cover the costs of their own high. Charles Bowden, in his new book Murder City, estimates that as many as 25,000 Juarenses may be involved in petty drug sales. At the height of the Great Recession, that meant one drug dealer for every four or five employed factory workers.

But this explosion of corner dealers was not responsible for the city’s dramatic transformation. That change came with the system of dealer protection. Each corner dealer works not only under an officer in the cartel, but in tandem with a beat cop. The cop protects the dealer and his gang against encroachments by other neighborhood gangs. The tiendita system is thus a logical extension of the rules of the Mexican drug “plaza,” the long-established formal arrangement between traffickers and security forces.

When foreigners talk about the Mexican drug business and the drug war, they talk about cartels carving up territory among each other and then going after each other’s turf. Mexicans, by contrast, begin with the plaza, a government concession sold to a preferred bidder. Trafficking drugs is effectively a licensed affair, the exclusive and protected rights to which are controlled by the military and the police.

In the tiendita system, it is not only locally “licensed” dealers who send their earnings up the chain of command. Beat cops, too, pay their supervisors and commanders. Hence the Juárez name for what the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) calls the “Juárez Cartel”: la línea—“police line.”

Chronically underpaid Mexican police traditionally have made their living livable with bribes—the famous mordita (“bite”). But historically they did not defend violently their right to bite. Street drugs changed that. De la Rosa told me that in the mid-1990s, only two of the city’s then-estimated 500 gangs were known to be armed. Now, 80 percent of them are.

The violence intensifies
This local retail model was highly successful, and it quickly became the industry standard. By 1997 it was dispersed widely across the industrial north. Carrillo Fuentes had risen in seven years to become Mexico’s wealthiest and most powerful drug trafficker, with a fortune estimated at $25 billion. His “assets” included General José de Jesús Gutiérrez Rebollo, the Mexican drug czar. In February 1997, just weeks after his appointment to the job, an investigation revealed that he had been on the Cartel’s payroll. Carrillo Fuentes also bought shares in a Mexican bank, a move that helped simplify his money laundering efforts.

When Carrillo Fuentes died while undergoing plastic surgery that summer, a violent power struggle predictably followed. But by today’s standards it was mild: a mere 72 deaths over eight months. Now, about a hundred are killed every two weeks in Juárez.

The narcoguerra following Carrillo Fuentes’s death introduced Juárez to “message killings”: bodies tortured, dismembered, and stuffed into boxes, car trunks, and barrels. Also new and shocking were the open-air executions: gangland-style killings at jam-packed restaurants. At the time, such crimes were rare enough that the media could follow them up and report on their continued lack of resolution.

The battle for succession remained mostly isolated to the top command in both the Cartel and the police (the probable first victim of that narcoguerra was a high-ranking federal police officer, killed by commandos just four days after Carrillo Fuentes’s botched surgery). With the confirmation of new leadership—Amado Carrillo Fuentes’s younger brother Vicente, according to conventional wisdom—the killing abated. But it never went away. And it never went back underground. Restaurants and bars became safe again, but killings continued in the neighborhoods where tienditas had taken root. There, factory workers lived tensely with the growing groups of tough, largely unemployed men and boys who moved constantly in and out of alliance with the more organized gangs.
There are 6,600 gun shops in the four U.S. border states. Of the 11,000 guns turned over to the ATF in 2009, almost 90 percent were traced to U.S. gun shops.

Meanwhile the city continued to gorge on the profits of local and international narcotics sales. Though few admitted it, everyone knew how the gaudy houses that popped up in the old moneyed enclaves were financed. Ditto the origins of the flashy princesses who began to grace the newspapers’ society pages. City elites chose to overlook the excesses of the trafficking business. “We tolerated the narco,” an upper–middle class friend recently told me. “That was our mistake.” I asked her why conventional, conservative-Catholic Juárez put up with the traffickers. “Look at all those businesses up and down the Avenida de las Americas,” she said, “it’s all money laundering. But it gave us restaurants to enjoy and boutiques to shop in.”

The price of permissiveness grew increasingly steep. In 1993 a no-nonsense retired accountant named Esther Chavez Cano noticed routine newspaper stories on the discovery of female corpses. The details were gruesome: some were found tortured and raped, almost all were tossed to the side of a road, as if they were litter. Chavez Cano began a newspaper column in which she demanded action and accountability. Her writing campaign soon launched a social movement that garnered international attention for the same city that was then proudly boasting of its manufacturing triumphs. She and those she inspired tallied 427 women dead or disappeared between 1993 and 2007, an undeniable symptom of the city’s violent alter ego.

But these horrific killings of young women eclipsed a more prosaic body count: that of the men who turned up dead all over the city with increasing regularity. It is easy enough to see how the murdered girls and women focused the world’s attention on Juárez’s perverse, misogynistic, and violent appetites. Nonetheless, for every publicized female corpse there are ten overlooked male counterparts, according to government data. Whatever the explanation for the high numbers of women killed, the one incontestable fact is that the killing of both women and men began in earnest the very year that the DEA says cocaine trafficking shifted from Miami to Juárez. This was not a coincidence.

The world’s deadliest city
I moved away from the border in 1999 but returned to visit in 2001. I caught up with two friends, also academics, who had been raised in the city’s toughest neighborhoods. We met at a cute bar on the corner of Avenida de las Americas and Avenida Lincoln. It was the kind of place then multiplying around town: refrigerated air, an impressive sound system, and swanky drinks. It shared a parking lot with a California-style sushi bar that in 1997 had been the site of the dinnertime execution of a businessman with suspected drug ties.

We talked about cholos. “Today’s cholo is different,” one of my friends remarked. “Yesterday’s cholo used to compete with merely his attitude, his fashion, and his posture. If the cholos really needed to fight, they fought with what they had available: rocks, stones. And then they got knives. But now some of them have guns.” Today, “some” would be “nearly all,” but as recently as 2001, guns were rare.

That summer I took pictures of a sixteen-year-old boy. He sported a bandana and an oversized tee shirt depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe and his initials in Gothic letters. He smiled so sweetly and eagerly that he hardly looked tough in his portrait. He and his mother beamed when I brought them copies. She surprised me with the pride she took in her son’s apparent cholo ambitions. I had never met such a parent.

That summer I was also surprised by what seemed to me an astronomical increase in the number of kids just hanging out, guarding turf on corners. Neighborhood toughs were now everywhere. And they belonged to a bewildering array of ranked groups, mysteriously nested within hierarchies that most of the teenagers I talked to only vaguely understood.

In 2001 I could see that what was once isolated in the bars and nightclubs and conducted its affairs after hours, had woken up to business in the daytime and set up shop close to home. The gap between Juárez-by-day and Juárez-by-night was narrowing to a sliver.

Today, the sliver has vanished. The Juárez Cartel and its rival, the Sinaloa Cartel, fight each other in the streets, and Mexican federal forces allegedly fight the traffickers. Rumor has it that a third trafficking organization, the Zetas, may have entered the market.

In any case, the violence escalates. There were many milestones along the way: 1993, the year that femicide was first recorded, the year when Amado Carrillo Fuentes reportedly assumed sole leadership of the Juárez Cartel; 1997, the escalation of violence after his death; 2000, when, with considerable fanfare, the FBI announced its mission to Juárez to locate the rumored remains of as many as a hundred victims buried in narcofosas, “drug graves” (only four bodies were found). Also crucial was 2004. That year, the United States lifted its ban on assault weapons, making it that much easier for traffickers to obtain their arms of choice. There are 6,600 gun shops in the four U.S. border states. Of the 11,000 guns turned over to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) by Mexican forces in 2009, almost 90 percent were traced to U.S. gun shops.
Homicides in Juárez nearly doubled from 123 to 234 between 1993 and 1994. The rate stabilized for the next dozen plus years, dipping in some, ranging from a low of 176 in 1999 to a high of 294 in 1995. The 2007 spike to 316 murders generated much year-end hand-wringing, but within a month 2007 appeared to be the calm before the storm. Violence exploded in January of 2008, with 46 killings. The total for February was 49. And in March, when President Felipe Calderón deployed thousands of troops to secure the city, the murder count doubled to 117. Now it rarely dips below those levels. One hundred deaths in a month would be considered a respite. May 2010 saw 253.

Mexicans, schooled in the reality of the drug business, find it hard to believe that security forces can fight traffickers. The two groups are indistinguishable.

The familiar explanation for the spasm of violence that has seized Juárez since January 2008 starts with Calderón’s vow upon taking office two years earlier to rid Mexico of all traffickers and his rapid deployment of troops to cartel hot spots. But almost from the start, skeptical observers have suggested that Calderón’s forces appear to be routing all traffickers but one: the powerful Sinaloa Cartel, headed by Joaquín Guzmán Loera, a.k.a. El Chapo (“shorty”). For Mexicans, schooled in the reality of the plaza, it is hard to believe that security forces can fight traffickers; they are, as one journalist put it to me recently in an email, indistinguishable from each other.

Consider the evidence that Mexicans never forget or overlook: shortly after President Carlos Salinas left office in 1994, his older brother’s wife was caught using a fake passport to withdraw more than $80,000,000 from a Swiss bank, part of the fortune her husband somehow managed to amass while working as a government bureaucrat. The disgraced ex-president fled into self-imposed exile in Ireland, a country that has no extradition treaty with Mexico.

His successor, Ernesto Zedillo, declared a U.S.-style war on drugs and then appointed Gutiérrez Rebollo as his drug czar, only to find that Carrillo Fuentes was paying Gutiérrez Rebollo his monthly rent for a national concession.

Even the first opposition president in Mexico’s modern history is not free of suspicion. Shortly after Vicente Fox’s election in 2000, he spent a weekend at the private Cancun retreat of Roberto Hernández Ramírez, CEO of Banamex (Mexico’s second-largest bank) and alleged drug trafficker.
None of this explains the extent of Juárez’s homicidal violence. One major difference between 1997 and 2008, as Gustavo de la Rosa Hickerson pointed out, is that the current war is being fought at every level of the trade, down to the street-level vendor and his protection and tribute network. As Charles Bowden puts it, this is not a war against drugs, it is a war for drugs. One related theory put forward by veteran observer Bill Conroy of Narco News is that the army moved into Juárez to take the concessionaire role away from the police.

The story of the two cities of Juárez thus applies to the entire country: what started in Juárez has become Mexico. The attempt to cripple the drug business in Juárez has meant crippling the city; doing the same in Mexico at large may mean crippling the nation.

Innocent victims
President Calderón has sought to make his drug war palatable by asserting that the country’s war dead—estimated at 23,000 since January 2006 for the country as a whole—deserved to die: their deaths implicate them in illegal activities.

When he first learned about what Juarenses have come to call the “massacre at Villas de Salvarcar,” Calderón hinted that the thirteen teenagers who died at the hands of professional executioners were common criminals and city low life. He could not have been more wrong. In fact they were honor students and athletes who had gathered to celebrate a friend’s seventeenth birthday. They had the misfortune of belonging to a football club whose initials, “AA,” were mistaken for the initials of the Sinaloa cartel’s local enforcers, the Artistic Assassins. And so, in the middle of the night, while the teens danced in a room cleared of furniture, they were gunned down. Seven hours later, when the first daylight photos were taken, the concrete floor where they died still glistened with their clotting blood.

The escalating war over the Juárez plaza coincided with a particularly unpleasant moment in the global market system—in the midst of massive factory layoffs prompted by the economic downtown beginning in 2007. Locals easily grasp that little of the current day-to-day violence in Juárez has much, directly, to do with any cartel. Look at who dies with grim regularity: a gang of teenage car thieves, a group of former cholos who opened a funeral home, a guy pilfering doors from an abandoned neighboring house. Not all victims are entirely innocent—the city is filled with scrappy, hard-working men and women, some of whom have turned to Juárez-by-night for survival now that Juárez-by-day has so little to offer them—but they are not drug dealers or corrupt police, either.
Accommodating the drug business has become a shockingly ordinary part of life. Working-class parents ask few questions when their studious daughters and sons lose factory jobs while their wayward siblings provide the household’s only income.

In February I spent a day with the director of a nonprofit day-care organization as she visited centers her group helped to launch. The owner of one home-based establishment related with good cheer being confronted by a nicely dressed middle-aged couple and their armed bodyguard. They advised her to start paying a $1,000-per-month protection fee. She and her family went into hiding for a few weeks before they reopened—quietly, and with great trepidation. The director laughed when I asked which cartel the extortionists work for. “People like that don’t work for anybody,” she replied. “They extort for a living because no one stops them!” The couple had shaken down the entire block of small family-owned businesses. Little matter that across the street stretched the vast army encampment, home to troops sent to end the city’s lawlessness.

Later my guide told me that Juarenses even have their own terms to distinguish between organized crime and opportunistic crime. The most common form of the latter is the secuestro express: a kidnapping that lasts no more than a few hours, just long enough to pressure a family to cough up an “affordable” ransom, but not long or expensive enough to attract the interests of enterprises that might want a cut.

Night falls
For decades, the maquilas’ critics longed for border businesses to be in control, rather than simply in service, of multinational capital. This is the irony of Carrillo Fuentes’s innovation: he became the Mexican-border trade baron who accomplished all that and more. His generation of traffickers adapted the maquila model to their own use by taking advantage of its infrastructure to move and market their products. No wonder Forbes recognized their achievements by including El Chapo Guzman in its 2010 list of global billionaires.

And what of the maquilas? The signs are not promising: in mid-January university researchers calculated industrial park vacancies at 14 percent—a historic high, up from an already-alarming 10 percent the year before. That month a Siemens customs manager was gunned down on his way to work. In October his subordinate had met her end after U.S. officials found drugs smuggled in a shipment. Mid-level staff are frequent targets, prompting some companies to consider extending their security measures beyond plant executives. It is probably just a matter of time before manufacturing firms move on.

What will be left of Juárez then? In El Paso, there are nightclubs, boutiques, fancy restaurants, and thriving industries. That city is growing in ways that seemed unimaginable even a decade ago. Even the mayor of Juárez has fled north of the border, and that was before he received a threat to his life in February—a severed pig’s head marked with his name.
Those who haven’t abandoned Juárez may be watching the death of it, both day and night.

source: http://bostonreview.net/BR35.4/hill.php

In 2009, the United Nations Member States decided to make further and decisive progress, within a decade, in controlling illicit drug supply and demand. Many illicit drug markets have reached global dimensions and require control strategies on a comparable scale. In that context, there is a need to better understand these transnational markets and the manner in which they operate. This year’s World Drug Report is a contribution towards that objective. It opens with an analytical discussion of three key transnational drug markets: the markets for heroin, cocaine and amphetamine-type stimulants. The market discussion is followed by a presentation of statistical trends for all major drug categories. The latest information on drug production, seizures and consumption is presented. Finally, there is a discussion on the relationship between drug trafficking and instability.

read more: World_Drug_Report_2010_lo-res

(It is very, very big, ca. 330 Pages)

For years, there has been much discussion about the best strategy to rid Afghanistan of its poppies. Eradication, said the George W Bush administration. Interdiction and alternative livelihoods, retorted the Barack Obama administration. Licensing and production for medicinal purposes, suggests the influential Senlis Council.

The issues have been fiercely debated: Would there be enough demand for Afghanistan’s legal morphine? Is the government too corrupt to implement this or that scheme? To what extent will eradication alienate farmers? Which crops should we substitute for poppies?

These questions are not unimportant, but fundamentally, they do not address the primary source of Afghan drug production: the
West’s (and Russia’s) insatiable demand for drugs.

Afghanistan accounts for about 90% of global illicit opium production. Western Europe and Russia are its two largest markets in terms of quantities consumed and market value (the United States is not an important market for Afghan opiates, importing the drugs from Latin America instead). Western Europe (26%) and Russia (21%) together consume almost half (47%) the heroin produced in the world, with four countries accounting for 60% of the European market: the United Kingdom, Italy, France and Germany.

In economic terms, the world’s opiates market is valued at $65 billion, of which heroin accounts for $55 billion. Nearly half of the overall opiate market value is accounted for by Europe (some $20 billion) and Russia ($13 billion). Iran is also a large consumer of opium, with smaller amounts of heroin. The situation is similar for cocaine, for which the US and Europe are the two dominant markets (virtually all coca cultivation takes place in Colombia, Peru and Bolivia).

In short, it is the West that has a drug problem, not producer countries like Afghanistan (or Colombia): demand is king and drives the global industry.

How should we reduce opiate consumption and its negative consequences in the West and Russia? Drug policy research has typically offered four methods. There is a wide consensus among researchers that such methods should be ranked as follows, from most to least effective: 1) treatment of addicts, 2) prevention, 3) enforcement, and 4) overseas operations in producer countries. For example, 12 established analysts reached the following conclusions, published a few months ago:

Efforts by wealthy countries to curtail cultivation of drug-producing plants in poor countries have not reduced aggregate drug supply or use in downstream markets, and probably never will … it will fail even if current efforts are multiplied many times over.

A substantial expansion of [treatment] services, particularly for people dependent on opiates, is likely to produce the broadest range of benefits … yet, most societies invest in these services at a low level.

Also, a widely cited 1994 RAND study concluded that targeting “source countries” is 23 times less cost effective than “treatment” for addicts domestically, the most effective method; “interdiction” was estimated to be 11 times less cost effective and “domestic enforcement” seven times. The problem is that the West’s drug policy strategy has for years emphasized enforcement, combined to overseas adventures, to the detriment of treatment and prevention. Also, Russia has been complaining about the suspension of eradication in Afghanistan, but it has a very poor record of offering treatment to its own addicts, rejecting widely accepted scientific evidence. Moscow has chosen a strategy that “serves the end of social control and enforcement,” just like the US: criminalization is emphasized and the largest share of public resources is directed to arrest, prosecute and incarcerate drug users, instead of offering them treatment. This worsens Russia’s HIV epidemic, the fastest growing in the world – with nearly one million HIV infections, some 80% of which related to the sharing of drug needles – while syringe availability remains very limited. For instance, methadone and buprenorphine remain prohibited by law in Russia, even if they are effective in reducing the drug problem by shifting addicts from illegal opiates to safer, legal alternatives. Accordingly, a just released New York University report states that “Nothing that happens in Afghanistan, for good or ill, would affect the Russian drug problem nearly as much as the adoption of methadone” in Russia – which would also help Afghanistan reduce poppy cultivation. Obama announced last year that the US would have access to seven military bases in Colombia under the pretext of fighting a war on terror and a war on drugs. Likewise, Russia recently announced that it would set up a second military base in Kyrgyzstan, to combat drug trafficking. Victor Ivanov, the Director of the Russian Federal Drug Control Service, explained how he was inspired by US drug war tactics in Latin America:

The United States‘ experience is certainly quite effective. The powerful flow of cocaine from Colombia into the United States prompted Washington to set up seven military bases in the Latin American nation in question. The US then used aircraft to destroy some 230,000 hectares of coca plantations … Russia suggests building its military base in Kyrgyzstan since it is the republic’s Osh region that is a center of sorts whence drugs are channeled throughout Central Asia.

Europe’s record on drug policy has improved over the last two decades, important advances having been made to bring harm reduction into the mainstream of drug policy, and rates of drug usage for each category of drugs are lower in the European Union (EU) than in states with a far more criminalized drug policy, such as the US, Canada and Australia. But there is still room for improvement. For example, although opioid substitution treatment and needle and syringe exchange programs now reach more addicts, “important differences between [European] countries continue to exist in scale and coverage”, a recent review of harm reduction policies in Europe concludes. In particular, “Overall provision of substitution treatment in the Baltic States and the central and south-east European regions, except in Slovenia, remains low despite some recent increases. An estimate from Estonia suggests that only 5% of heroin users in the four major urban centers are covered by substitution programs, and that this rate is as low as 1% at national level.“ Lack of funds is no excuse, as there is plenty of money available, for instance, out of the $300 billion Europeans spend every year on their militaries, to maintain among other things their more than 30,000 troops in Afghanistan. The UK was put in charge of counter-narcotics in Afghanistan. However, domestically, leading specialists Peter Reuter and Alex Stevens report that “Despite rhetorical commitments to the rebalancing of drug policy spending towards treatment… the bulk of public expenditure continues to be devoted to criminal justice measures… this emphasis on enforcement in drug control expenditures also holds for the most explicitly harm reduction-oriented country, the Netherlands.“ In the UK, over 1994-2005, “the number of prison cell years handed out in annual sentences has tripled“ (although significant increases have also been made towards treatment). “The prison population has increased rapidly in the past decade [and] the use of imprisonment has increased even more rapidly for drug offenders than other offenders… These increases have contributed significantly to the current prison overcrowding crisis.“ British enforcement costs taxpayers dearly, but the government does not regularly or publicly calculate those costs. Through a Freedom of Information request a document was released that “calculated the annual cost of enforcing drug laws – including police, probation, prison and court costs – at approximately ฃ2.19 billion, of which about ฃ581 million was spent on imprisoning drug offenders.“ All this said, there is one way in which Afghanistan does have a drug problem, namely, its increasing number of addicts. A recent report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) estimated that drug use had increased dramatically over the last few years and that around one million Afghans now suffer from drug addiction, or 8% of the population – twice the global average. Since 2005, the number of regular opium users in Afghanistan has grown from 150,000 to 230,000 (a 53% increase) and for heroin, from 50,000 to 120,000 (a 140% increase). This spreads HIV/AIDS because most injecting drug users share needles. But treatment resources are very deficient. Only about 10% of addicts have ever received treatment, meaning that about 700,000 are left without it, which prompted UNODC chief Antonio Maria Costa to call for much greater resources for drug prevention and treatment in the country. The problem is that the Obama and Bush administrations could not care less: since 2005, the US has allocated less than $18 million to “demand reduction” activities in Afghanistan – less than 1% of the $2 billion they spent on eradication and interdiction. Clearly, US priorities have nothing to do with fighting a war on drugs.

source: http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/LG01Df02.html